5 Ways To Get The Most Out Of The Off Season

I guess we’re getting just about to that point of the year. The days get shorter, the group rides start to taper off, and the last of the gran fondos and event rides are just about over. For racers, the last road races of the season should be in a week or two.

For many, it means taking some well-deserved time off. For most though, it means it’s time to start thinking about the off-season.

Now don’t let the term “off-season” fool you—this is the best time of year for riding. But to rest, recover, and come back stronger next year, follow these simple tips for the rest of this year.

 

1. Long Steady Distance (LSD)

This fall, ride longer and slower than you normally would. This is the time of year for sprawling weekend rides in the little ring. And when we say steady, we mean slow and steady. Take it conversation-pace easy, ride with a buddy, and have a good time.

Why: During the high season of cycling most riders concentrate on high intensity work, which is great for building strength, but often neglect the slow burn work that builds aerobic capacity. LSD riding during the fall and winter will help you build a good aerobic base for the spring.

long steady distance

Fall and winter are the time for slow, steady, meandering rides to take in the scenery, enjoy a mid-ride conversation, and build an aerobic base

 

2. Mix It Up

During the fall we normally introduce more rest days into our week. Normally we ride 5-6 days a week during the summer, but usually reduce it to just 3 or 4 during the fall, with half of those being mountain bike or ‘cross rides.

Why: Letting your body and mind rest by riding fewer days and mixing up the type of riding you do is incredibly important. The rest days give your body time to recover and rebuild, while varying up your riding routine helps prevent mental burnout.

mix it up

Mixing in some mountain biking can be a good way to keep from mentally burning out

 

3. Get Stronger

Run. Lift weights. Do core work. In short, try to work out the muscles you don’t use much during cycling.

Why: Cycling is a single plane exercise that only works a few muscles in specific directions. Running, lifting weights, and core work can help strengthen muscles, tendons and ligaments to help prevent injury.

*If it’s been a few years since you last ran or lifted, go easy until your tendons, ligaments and muscles can adapt. Most cyclists are very aerobically fit, which means when they start running or lifting they can easily injure themselves by trying to do too much too soon.

For running start out easy with a half a mile once a week to start, then build in .5 mile increments from there.

For weight lifting we recommend consulting a personal trainer before you start. It’s worth the $30 or $40 it costs for a session if it avoids a more costly injury later from using too much weight or improper form.

Running and lifting weights can help you get in shape for 'cross season and make you more injury resistant next year

Running and lifting weights can help you get in shape for ‘cross season and make you more injury resistant next year

4. Stretch It Out

Last weekend we pulled the yoga mat out of the closet and started going to our traditional off-season classes again. With darker days coming, this is a great time to start doing some yoga or pilates that can help lengthen tight muscles, reducing the chance of injury and the inflammation that builds up after months or riding.

Why: Cycling can be very hard on muscles, and when overworked they often respond by shortening and forming adhesions and muscles knots. Dynamic lengthening exercises like yoga and pilates help safely stretch out those muscles, helping to reduce back, neck and shoulder pain, and make you more flexible, which also makes you more resistant to injury.

yoga

Yoga and pilates are good ways to get more limber to help avoid injury

 

5. Mix In Intensity

We know we just said to go easy through the fall and winter. But make sure you’re doing the occasional high intensity ride that really pushes up your heart rate and makes you work hard. Try doing a hard intervals ride or a difficult trainer session once a week or once every other week.

Why: Low intensity is a good thing for recovery, but too much of it can lead to detraining, which is where you begin to loose fitness. Studies show that by doing occasional high intensity training, you can preserve your peak fitness by up to 15 weeks. Think of it as kind of like occasionally starting the engine on a car that’s been put away for the winter.

intensity

Long and slow distance is the name of the game– but don’t forget to get some high intensity work in too

New Bike Preview: 2015 GT Grade

One of the most exciting bikes of the year is the 2015 GT Grade gravel bike. This thing has been lighting up trade shows, magazine reviews, and “Best Of” lists since it was first announced. In fact, they’ve been in such high demand for test rides and reviews that even we hadn’t seen one in person until last week– and then it was a prototype demo model.

The 2015 GT Grade in it's element

The 2015 GT Grade in it’s element

For those of you who are seeing this bike for the first time, the Grade is a gravel bike that’s designed for going on-road, off-road, or anywhere in between. The carbon fiber frame has huge tire clearance and a super comfortable geometry, but also has some innovative features like Continuous Glass Fiber seatstays that almost like a suspension, and the triple triangle design for improved frame durability.

The first question we always get when we mention the Grade is “when does it come out?” We’ve even gotten that question on Facebook and Instagram apropos of nothing. So to vaguely answer your questions: soon, soon, terribly soon. Just be patient a little bit longer.

Until then, we took some tasty photos of the demo model Grade to whet your appetite for Enduroad adventures. And trust us, as soon as it’s in stock, we’ll let you all know.

*please note that this is a prototype demo model bike, and does not have the same equipment as the final retail model. Actually, it’s pretty close. But the retail model will have Shimano RS685 hydraulic mechanical levers, instead of the R785 Di2 hydraulic electronic system shown here.

Brian’s Alpine Loop Gran Fondo Prep

It’s that time of year again… time for one of our employees to put themselves to the test with Jeremiah Bishop’s Alpine Loop Gran Fondo. We’ve covered this event before in the past, where clothing buyer Zach, and others, have tackled this legendarily tough ride.

Starting in Harrisonburg, VA the ride covers about 105 miles and features over 11,000 feet of climbing. And just to make sure that it’s extra tough, the two biggest climbs are a combination of dirt and gravel.

It’s going to be a tough one, but well worth it to raise money for prostate cancer.

This year, Brian, our content and media writer, will be undertaking the challenge. He’s a fairly experienced cyclist, and has been training hard since May, after doing the Ronde van Vlaanderen Sportif in Belgium. He’s never done the ride before, but he says he’s feeling pretty good.

Find out more about his preparation and his equipment below.

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What made you want to do the Alpine Loop Gran Fondo?

Ever since I moved to North Carolina and came to work at Performance, I’ve heard stories about how hard it is. I love looking for long, challenging rides that really test my fitness and push my limits. As I’ve gotten older I’ve kind of lost interest in actual racing, but I still like to get competitive on a bike, and see how I stack up against other riders. Gran Fondo’s are a perfect opportunity to do that, whether you’ve raced in the past or are just getting into the sport.

What are you excited about?

Finally doing the Alpine Loop. I planned to do the Gran Fondo in both 2012 and 2013, but had to miss out for various reasons. Third time is a charm I guess. Beyond that, I’m looking forward to ending the season on a high note.

What are you feeling nervous about?

The big climbs. It was a busy summer for me, and I didn’t get a chance to go out to the mountains for some of those long, hour long climbs. Mostly this year I’ve done stuff like the Ronde with short, punchy, hills. I did a lot of Youtube trainer workouts for climbing though, so I guess on Sunday we’ll see if that was enough.

What bike will you be using?

Scattante Titanium. Anyone remember those? I was lucky enough to get my hands on one a few years back and it’s been my go to for long distance rides. Nice upright endurance geometry, and the titanium is excellent for handling road vibration.

I built it up with Campy 11-speed, and some burly handbuilt 32-spoke wheels.

Brian's titanium Scattante frame should be the right tool for the job

Brian’s titanium Scattante frame should be the right tool for the job

Did you make any special equipment changes for the Alpine Loop?

Yeah, absolutely. 100+ miles, 11K feet of climbing, gravel…that’s a long day on the bike and you need to be ready.

 

What equipment will you be using?

Brian's clothing and equipment choices for the Alpine Loop

Brian’s clothing and equipment choices for the Alpine Loop

 

There’s a lot of gnarly gravel sections. What repair items are you carrying?

tool-knoll

 

What else will you carry?

Even though the Gran Fondo will have food available, Brian is bringing plenty of his own, just in case

Even though the Gran Fondo will have food available, Brian is bringing plenty of his own, just in case

 

Thanks Brian, and good luck!

Check back next week for Brian’s Jeremiah Bishop Alpine Loop Gran Fondo recap.

 

To learn more about how to prepare for your next big ride, check out these articles:

CX ’15: Ridley Cyclocross Bikes

We all love Ridley road bikes. You’d be hardpressed to find a faster bike than the Noah, or a bike that climbs better than the Helium. But what Ridley– and Belgium– is really known for are their cyclocross bikes. The carbon fiber Ridley X-Fire and X-Night are some of the most sought after CX bikes in the world, and even the aluminum X-Ride is still one of the best performing cyclocross bikes around.

Ridley X-Night 30

The choice of most of the world’s best cyclocross teams, and even used by the Lotto-Belisol profession road team for cobbled races, the Ridley X-Night 30 is one of the most advanced and fastest CX bikes out there. With a stiff, responsive carbon fiber frame with internal cable routing, a massive carbon fiber fork with internal disc brake cable routing, disc brakes, Shimano Ultegra 6800 11-speed drivetrain, an FSA ‘cross crankset, and 4ZA Cirrus deep section wheels, this is a straight up race machine that’s meant to go fast and put you on the top of the podium.

Ridley X-Fire 10

With a fast and lively racing set up, the Ridley X-Fire 10 is a great option for the serious racer who wants a top-level competition bike, but doesn’t mind hauling a few extra grams to save some cash. The Ridley X-Fire uses a more compliant 24-ton carbon lay up than the X-Night, but is still more than equal to anything else you’ll meet on the course. Like the X-Night, it’s built up with an Shimano Ultegra 6800 11-speed drivetrain, FSA ‘cross crankset, disc brakes, and deep section 4ZA Cirrus wheels. If you demand top performance from one of the most respected brands in the sport…and are look for a great value, it’s tough beat the Ridley X-Fire.

Ridley X-Ride 20

The Ridley X-Ride is the aluminum cousin of the X-Fire, but is still a serious, race-worthy bike in itself. The 7005 aluminum frame is super stiff, and much more durable than carbon fiber, and the 4ZA Oryx full carbon fork really helps to stiffen up the front end. Disc brakes, an all-new SRAM Rival 22 11-speed drivetrain, FSA ‘cross crankset, 4ZA Cirrus deep section wheels, and Clement Crusade PDX tires make the X-Ride one of the best values in a high-performance racing package around. If you’re looking for a first ‘cross bike, an value-orient upgrade, or an all-around bike for year round riding, the X-Ride is the way to go.

Check out our other CX ’15 articles

Build A Fall Cycling Wardrobe

fall-clothing-essentials

The weather isn’t cold….yet. But it’s getting there. Which means that now is the time to get your cycling wardrobe ready for the change. After all, fall is probably the best time to ride, and you don’t want to be stuck inside on that first beautifully cool day because you don’t have the right clothes.

The key to riding in fall is versatility through layering. Since the day can start off cold but heat up later, layers of clothing allow you to start the ride warm, then shed the small, easily packable outerlayers as you ride.

 

Here are 7 Fall Clothing Essentials:

 

1. Arm and Leg Warmers

These are probably the most versatile items in the cyclist’s arsenal. Warmers can help extend the temperature range of your shorts and jerseys well down into the 50’s and 60’s…lower if you run hot. Pair them with a vest or jacket to get even more versatility.

 

Arm warmers may be the most versatile clothing option you have

Arm warmers may be the most versatile clothing option you have

2. Vest

The vest is probably the second most versatile item you can own. Wear it over a short sleeve jersey when the day starts cool, pair with arm and leg warmers on colder days, or bring it along to layer over a jacket if the weather really turns.

They’re so light, offer so much protection, and roll up so small, there’s no reason not to bring it with you on every fall ride.

 

The vest is a close second. Small, packable, and protective

The vest is a close second. Small, packable, and protective

3. Jacket

As awesome as the vest and warmers are, they can only take you so far into the season. At some point, you’ll need some more protection. Fall isn’t quite thermal softshell territory yet (save the big guns for winter), but a thermal jacket can help you stay warmer as we get into later October and early November.

 

A wind jacket is essential as it gets later into the season

A wind jacket is essential as it gets later into the season

4. Full Finger Gloves

Keep those digits warm. There’s nothing worse on a ride than having cold fingers (except for maybe cold feet). So keep them warm by wearing some good, full finger gloves. A decent long finger glove can keep your fingers warm in brisk weather, without all the insulation you usually need in a big winter glove.

 

Full finger gloves offer plenty of protection without bulk

Full finger gloves offer plenty of protection without bulk

5. Baselayer

A baselayer serves two purposes in fall: 1) it gives you a little bit of extra warmth for cooler days—which can be a real blessing on cold mornings, and 2) it helps wick away sweat. The second part is important, because fall days can have you feeling too hot one minute, and too cold the next, so the baselayer helps control your core temperature.

 

Baselayers help control your core temperature, to keep you warm without overheating

Baselayers help control your core temperature, to keep you warm without overheating

6. Toe Covers

Since cycling shoes are usually the closest fitting shoes most people have, there’s not enough room to wear a thicker wool sock. Instead, most cyclists opt for the overshoe or toe warmers to keep their feet warm on cooler rides. The big advantage of toe warmers is that they don’t completely cover all the vents, so your foot can still vent some extra heat. If the day really warms up, they’re small enough to fit easily in a jersey pocket.

 

Toe covers keep toes warm, but are easy to remove and pack down small

Toe covers keep toes warm, but are easy to remove and pack down small

7. Headband

This is an ear saver when rides start on cooler mornings. It helps keep the cold wind off your forehead and ears, but doesn’t make you overheat like a full skullcap might. As the ride rolls on and the day warms up, you can just pull over and take it off. They roll up so tiny you might even lose it in your jersey pocket afterwards.

 

The headband is an excellent item for early morning starts

The headband is an excellent item for early morning starts

 

Did we miss any essentials? Let us know in the comments.

Real Advice: 4 Fall Ride Essentials

As the summer draws to a close, the kinds of riding most of us do changes too. For some a long summer of training and racing has left the legs feeling fairly torched and ready for a rest with slower, leisurely rides. For others, the cooler temperatures mean that it’s now more comfortable to put in those long, big mile days in the saddle.

No matter how you ride this fall though, here are 4 things you shouldn’t leave the house without.

1. Complete Repair Kit

In most parts of the country, fall is a pretty rainy time of year. That means that there’s lots of extra stuff on the roads that can give you a flat, and rain and road grit can take a bigger toll on your chain.

While we normally eschew the seat wedge during the summer and roll with a minimal flat kit, during the fall and winter we embrace it, and stuff it with:

A full repair kit is a must for fall riding

A full repair kit is a must for fall riding

 

2. Lights

No matter what time it is when we leave the house for a ride, we always bring some emergency lights this time of year.

Small, lightweight LED’s are easy to affix to your bars and seatpost, or fit easily in a pocket. Having a front and rear light can help you stay visible in traffic when it gets dark, when the sky is overcast, or the weather turns bad.

Small LED lights, like these Blackburn lights, are lightweight and easy to attach

Small LED lights, like these Blackburn lights, are lightweight and easy to attach

 

3. Vest / Jacket

A packable wind jacket or vest will roll up small and easily fits into a jersey pocket. This is a September-April essential for us, since the weather can change quickly and you never know when you might need it.

A vest is a great option for warmer or windy days when the primary concern is keeping the core warm. They also roll up super tiny, so they take up minimal pocket room when you take them off.

Jackets are a better option for days that a very windy, have a chance of rain, or when you’ll be doing climbs that involve long descents. They are a little bulkier, but the fuller protection and wind/water-resistant fabrics will provide more complete protection against the elements.

A packable wind jacket or vest can help you be prepared for changeable weather

A packable wind jacket or vest can help you be prepared for changeable weather

 

4. Cash

Cards are great, but cash is still king. If you’re going for a long ride into the country, there are fewer better pit stops during a ride then stopping at a roadside produce stand for some harvest-fresh apples, cider, or other treats. Not only are they healthier than most snacks we eat on the road, but are super fresh and usually only for sale for a few short weeks.

Carrying some cash with you is ensures you'll always be ready for a pit stop

Carrying some cash with you is ensures you’ll always be ready for a pit stop

 

What do you carry when you ride?

Tell us in the comments.

 

Last Minute Prep: Getting Ready For That Big Ride

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Have you signed up for a Gran Fondo or charity ride? Now is the time of year when most of those rides are coming up, so it’s important to be prepared. If you’re like us, you’re probably starting to get down into your final week or two of preparation.

Remember, it’s the little details that can undo us. Things that may seem harmless when off the bike: a slightly off-center stem, a slight creak from the bottom bracket, picking the wrong flavor of gels, a hill coming sooner than you expected, etc… can all become issues that seem monumental by mile 50– enough so that it can get into your head and begin to impact your performance.

To head off such calamity,  follow our checklist below.

After all, cycling is like life. Taking care of small details now leads to successful outcomes later.

 

1. Get In One Last Big Ride

The weekend before your event, try and do one last ride that’s at least 75% of the distance you’ll need to do. And make sure you do it wearing the clothes you plan on riding in, and with your bike set up how you will be riding it. This will be your big chance to test everything out and make any changes.

Hopefully you’ve been training for at least 8 weeks beforehand and are fully prepared. This last ride is to get some last miles in the legs and check your fitness level to help to determine pacing for the event itself.

Getting in some last big miles the weekend before will give you a change to test your equipment

Getting in some last big miles the weekend before will give you a change to test your equipment

2. Rest Up

The week leading up to the event itself, rest up. Try to go for a ride every day, but just do some gentle, small ring spinning for short distances. This will help keep your legs limber and preserve your fitness, but will also keep you rested so you feel fresh and ready come game time.

Going for easy spins the week before your event will keep your legs limber and preserve fitness

Going for easy spins the week before your event will keep your legs limber and preserve fitness

 

3. Prepare Your Bike

Is your bike tuned up? Is your gearing right? Do you need to change out tires or add more padding to your bar tape? The week before the event, either spend a few evenings fine tuning your bike, or take it to a Performance Bicycle shop and ask them to do a quick tune up (you might want to call ahead for lead times).

Don’t do anything drastic though like change out your saddle, try a new pair of shoes, or change your stem length or bike fit. Now is NOT the time to try something new. Even if you invested in an upgrade, roll with what you have until after your event (unless it’s new wheels or tires). You don’t want to realize at mile 35 of a 100 mile ride that the new saddle you bought isn’t really working out.

Don’t put it off until the night before. If something goes wrong, you’ll want plenty of time to fix it.

Getting your bike tuned up before the ride can help you feel more prepared the day of your event

Getting your bike tuned up before the ride can help you feel more prepared the day of your event

4. Study The Course And Elevation Profiles

Get to know the course beforehand. Do you know where the turns are? Do you know when the big climbs are? You don’t have to memorize everything, but you should be familiar enough with the route to know what to expect. If there’s a cue-sheet you can download, print it out and bring it with you. If you have a GPS or cycling computer, see if you can find the course map on Strava or Garmin and load it on your computer.

You can also go old school Pro and use a piece of tape on the stem to write down any significant areas of the course on it.

For Alpine Loop Gran Fondo, we’ll be using a Garmin GPS and a piece of tape on the stem to note at what mileage the big climbs start at (and where they end).

Getting familiar with the course profile and climbs can help you feel more prepared

Getting familiar with the course profile and climbs can help you feel more prepared

 

5. Prepare the Night Before

The morning of an event is always a hectic one. Between dressing, eating, getting to the event, sign in and getting to the start line, there’s a lot to take care of.

Make it easy on yourself, and do as much as you can the night before.

-Tires inflated

-Chain cleaned and lubricated

-Lights (if needed for early AM start) affixed to bike

-Clothing laid out

-Food flavors and types carefully selected

-Jersey pockets / seatwedge pre-packed

-Food, tools, tube, pump, route cue sheet, etc…

-Phone and cycling computer fully charged

-Water bottles pre-filled

-Drink mix flavors carefully selected

-Breakfast pre-made and ready to eat

-Alarm set for at least 2 hours before start (to give you some time just in case)

Laying out all your food and equipment the night before can save you precious time in the morning

Laying out all your food and equipment the night before can save you precious time in the morning

WANT TO LEARN EVEN MORE? CHECK OUT THE ARTICLES BELOW:

Real Advice: 5 Tips For The Workday Cyclist

 

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An unfortunate feature of adult life is that it requires most of us to spend 8+ hours a day at work. While it might be necessary for paying the bills and providing for our families (and maybe buying some new bike gear here and there), it leaves a lot of folks—even us—feeling like there’s too little time in life for riding.

Few people realize however that there are ways to sneak in a workout at work. Before having the good fortune of finding my way to the Promised Land of Performance, I worked in a high-pressure, high-demand advertising job where late nights and working weekends were the norm. To stay sane and keep my fitness, I had to get pretty creative about ways to get a workout in and stay in shape.

Here are a few tips I learned about Working Out At Work*.

*We’re all adults here, so use common sense. Only you know your work environment, and we highly advise you to evaluate how permissive your workplace is about lunch hour use, absenteeism, and office space use before attempting any of these ideas.  

 1. Use Your Lunch Hour Wisely

If you work in an office, nobody says you actually have to eat on your lunch break. I used to bring my bike, a kit, shoes and helmet to work and ride on my lunch hour. Afterwards, I’d feel much more energetic and focused.

After my ride, I’d eat lunch at my desk and catch up on emails.

And as for cleaning up? I used to keep some Nathan Power Shower wipes and some deodorant in my bag, and I’d just clean up and change in the bathroom

If you can, try using your lunch hour to ride, and then eat at your desk afterwards

If you can, try using your lunch hour to ride, and then eat at your desk afterwards

2.Reclaim Your Time

Some days can just fill up with (pointless) meetings. Sometimes I’d feel like my time was booked solid from 9-6. If I felt like I could get away with it, I’d schedule a fake “meeting” at lunch on my Outlook calendar so I could get an hour for myself to ride.

Still expected to be at the office? Sometimes—especially if I had to work on a weekend,  I would get really desperate, which meant I had to get sneaky. I’d leave an empty wallet and a set of old keys on my desk, along with a cup of coffee. That way I would appear to still be in the office, but be on my bike instead.

If you don't have time in a day to go for a ride, you might need to schedule yourself some time

If you don’t have time in a day to go for a ride, you might need to get creative with your Outlook calendar

 3.Make A Friend

If you don’t want to risk leaving the building, or if the weather is really bad (ie: winter), try making friends with the building manager or a maintenance professional. Ask if they can let you set up a stationary trainer in a spare closet or unused office space. During the winters I convinced our building manager to let me use an old store room next to her office for me and a buddy to set up stationary trainers. That way we could disappear for a while, get in a quick ride, and never leave the office.

Check with HR, the building manager, or maintenance staff to see if there's a space where you can set up a trainer

Check with HR, the building manager, or maintenance staff to see if there’s a space where you can set up a trainer

4.Alternatives

Sometimes it’s just impossible to get out of the office, either because of work volume or threat of termination. In that case, you can still do some healthy alternatives.

Standing up from your desk once an hour to do some stretching, dynamic strength moves like lunges, or a yoga pose or two is not only really good for you (studies show it could literally save your life), but can also help you get in better cycling shape.

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Standing up at least once an hour to stretch or do dynamic exercises can do more than just improve your cycling

5. Playing The Hand You’re Dealt

Ok, there are times where working out at work just isn’t going to happen, in which case you need to be realistic and start planning how to get some rides in.

Some ideas are to get in a ride before work before the day gets away from you, commuting to work, or trying to get in two shorter rides during the day. Only you know how truly busy you are—so try to find places where you have even 15 spare minutes…plenty of time for a hammer session on the trainer.

Spending even just 15 minutes on the trainer when you get a chance can help improve your fitness

Spending even just 15 minutes on the trainer when you get a chance can help improve your fitness

Fix It Tip: What’s That Noise?

Probably the most commonly asked question when it comes to bikes is “what’s that noise?”

Sometimes noises are just annoying but fairly harmless. But since bikes are (relatively) simple machines, a noise is usually the first indicator that something is not working as it should. Most common mechanical problems can be correctly identified by sound alone, making fixing the problem that much quicker and easier.

A quick note on carbon frames: due to the physical properties of carbon fiber, carbon frames are notorious for transmitting some noises through the frame, making hunting down a squeak a little more difficult, since something that sounds like it’s coming from the headset could actually be coming from the rear wheel. In this case, your best bet is to go through a process of elimination until the problem is solved.

A quick note on safety: Over tightening bolts, over greasing parts, or toying around with moving parts can make the problem worse instead of better. If you’re unsure what you’re doing, please take your bike to the nearest Performance Bicycle shop and have them take a look at it.

Need help finding something on your bike? Check out our Anatomy of a Bicycle.

 

Common Noises

Metallic skipping sound when pedaling

Cause: You rear derailleur is out of alignment, causing the chain to not sit properly on the cogs

Other Symptoms: Your bike may also not be shifting properly, either moving to the incorrect gear, or not moving the chain at all when you press the lever

Fix: Adjust your rear derailleur cable tension using the barrel adjuster

Complications: If the skipping is more pronounced in the smallest or biggest cogs, it may because your rear derailleur hanger is bent. Bring it to your nearest Performance shop to have the Spin Doctor do this quick fix.

CLICK HERE to learn how to fix it yourself

Skipping noises come from a poorly adjusted rear derailleur

Skipping noises come from a poorly adjusted rear derailleur

Metallic scraping noise when pedaling

Cause: Your front derailleur is out of alignment, causing the chain to rub against the derailleur cage

Other Symptoms: The chain may look like its vibrating as you pedal, chain may not stay in the big chainring

Fix: Reset your front derailleur cable tension by shifting the chain into the little ring, loosening the cable fixing bolt, pulling the cable until it is taut, and then tightening the cable fixing bolt

Complications: Your high or low limit screws may be improperly adjusted, restricting the derailleur from moving fully into position. If this is the case, adjust your limit screws to the proper setting.

CLICK HERE to learn how to fix it yourself

A metallic scraping noise usually comes from the chain rubbing against the front derailleur, as seen here

A metallic scraping noise usually comes from the chain rubbing against the front derailleur, as seen here

High Pitched “Singing” Sound

Cause: Loose wheel spoke

Other Symptoms: The offending wheel may also feel wobbly, or be rubbing against your brakes

Fix: Tighten the spoke. You can either do this at home with a spoke wrench, or bring it to your local Performance shop to have you Spin Doctor take a look.

Loose wheel spokes often cause a high pitched "singing" noise when riding

Loose wheel spokes often cause a high pitched “singing” noise when riding

Squeaks & Creaks

Oh boy, this is a tough one. If you can’t identify exactly where the noise is coming from, your best bet is to go through each potential cause one by one until the problem is eliminated.

Squeak When Sitting (independent of pedal stroke)

Possible Causes:

  1. Seatpost

Fix: Mark seatpost height with tape, remove post, regrease, reinstall and tighten to spec

CLICK HERE to learn how to fix it yourself

  1. Quick Release Skewers

Fix: Remove front and rear quick release skewers, grease the threads, reinstall and make sure they are nice and tight

CLICK HERE to learn how to fix it yourself

  1. Saddle

Fix: Mark saddle position with tape, remove saddle, lightly grease rails, reinstall and tighten to spec

CLICK HERE to learn how to fix it yourself

  1. Brake Rub (this can either sound like a squeak or a rubbing sound, depending on rim material)

Fix: Adjust brakes to ensure they are properly aligned. Ensure wheel is centered in dropouts. Check that wheel is true—if it’s wobbly bring to Performance store to have it trued.

CLICK HERE to learn how to fix it yourself

Squeak When Sitting (Only when pedaling)

Possible Causes:

  1. Pedals

Fix: Remove pedals, grease threads, reinstall and tighten to spec

  1. Cleats (for clipless pedals)

Fix: Make sure cleat bolts are tight, lightly grease pedal interface (where cleats lock into pedal)

CLICK HERE to learn how to fix it yourself

Loose pedals can cause a lot of noise

Loose pedals can cause a lot of noise

Squeak When Standing

Possible Causes:

  1. Loose Bottom Bracket

Fix: Remove bottom bracket, clean, regrease, reinstall and tighten to spec

Loose Crank

Fix: Check tightness of crank fixing bolt on non-drive side (SRAM/Shimano/Race Face/Travitiv) or in BB shell (Campagnolo)

Loose Headset

Fix: Loosen stem pinch bolts, tighten headset cap, retighten stem pinch bolts to spec. Also check to make sure you have enough headset spacers to headset cap to fully seat. Don’t over-tighten, it should still be able to turn smoothly.

CLICK HERE to learn how to fix it yourself

  1. Loose Handlebars

Fix: Remove stem faceplate bolts, regrease, reinstall to spec

CLICK HERE to learn how to fix it yourself

  1. Cracked Frame or fork

Fix: This is a very serious, and dangerous, issue. Stop riding bike immediately, and bring to your local Performance shop to be evaluated.

 

Rattling:

Possible Causes:

  1. Loose Bottle Cages

Fix: Ensure bottle cage bolts are tight

Loose Seat Wedge

Fix: Tighten straps

  1. Cable Slap

Fix: Ensure all cables have appropriate tension. If problem persists add mid-cable bumpers to prevent cable from rattling against frame.

  1. Cable Housing Rub

Fix: Cable housing is bouncing against headtube. Ensure brake and shift cable housing is cut to the appropriate length

  1. Loose Headset

Fix: Loosen stem pinch bolts, tighten headset cap, retighten stem pinch bolts to spec. Also check to make sure you have enough headset spacers to headset cap to fully seat. Don’t overtighten, it should still be able to turn smoothly.

CLICK HERE to learn how to fix it yourself

 

Again, a quick note on safety: if you’re not quite sure what your doing or how to do something, bring your bike to the shop and let the Spin Doctor mechanic take a look.

Let us know in the comments: is there anything we missed? Do you have any suggestions for quick fixes for annoying bike noises?

Eddie’s Shenandoah 100 Recap

eddie MTB

Eddie all smiles at the start. Smile…or practicing his suffer face? We’re still unsure.

Last weekend our coworker Eddie rode the Shenandoah Mountain 100 mountain bike race. When we first heard about his decision, we were a little envious and a little like “why would you do that?”. But, Performance being a supportive work environment when it comes to doing cool stuff on bikes, we went with it and gave him plenty of (possibly unsolicited) advice.

Last week we profiled his race prep, and now that the race is all done and dusted it’s time to check in with Eddie for a race recap.

Read more below to find out what worked for Eddie, what didn’t work so well for Eddie, and what you need to know it you’re thinking about doing an epic MTB race next year.

-HI Eddie. Can you tell us a little bit about how you felt going into the race?

Going into the race, I felt good. I had my bike dialed, I knew my fitness was good, and felt like I got a lot of good information about the course. Everything worked out perfectly, aside from a series of flat tires (3 within the first 40 miles). Other than that, I felt great for the whole race. My finishing time was just over 10 hours, which I was totally happy with.

-What was your favorite part?

Aside from crossing the finish line, I think the highlight of the race was how nice and helpful everyone was. I got three flat tires and guys racing would stop to give me a tube and let me use their hand pump (mine fell out somewhere) with no hesitation. That was awesome how people were willing to stop and help out, even in the middle of a race. Everyone cheered you on and really kept morale high. Also, my girlfriend was volunteering at aid station 3 and after 45 miles, the PB&J she handed me was maybe the best I’ve ever had.

Eddie MTB 2

Eddie all smiles at the finish. Not sure if that’s a smile or a Chris Horner rictus grin.

-What was your least favorite part?

My least favorite part would be the first climb, the Briery Branch ascent. With so many people, your pace was pretty much determined by the person in front of you. I pretty much had to walk the whole thing because there was a line of people walking up the mountain and the pace was too slow to ride. It was frustrating, but the descent made it well worth it.

-What equipment choices worked well?

The biggest thing that worked for me was a last minute saddle swap before the race. I typically ride with a lightweight road saddle, but decided to trade it out in favor of a softer Fizik saddle which really made 10 hours on a bike much more comfortable. The e*Thirteen 40 tooth extended range cog (now available standard on some 2015 GT mountain bikes) was a life saver. I probably did 90% of all my climbing in that gear and was definitely happy to have had it, especially at about mile 90.

The e*thriteen 40T extended range cog was a life-saver on the steep climbs

The e*thirteen 40T extended range cog was a life-saver on the steep climbs

-What equipment would you change next year?

Next year I would definitely go with a bigger rear tire. This year I was running a Racing Ralph 2.25”, but will definitely be running 2.35” tires front and rear next time. A bigger tire would help with traction on the climbs as well as some extra cushion on the descents. Also, while the 36 tooth chainring was manageable, I think a 34 or even a 32 would have made some of the singletrack climbing a bit easier.

A wider rear tire would definitely be a change for next year

A wider rear tire would definitely be a change for next year

-Would you do it again?

Absolutely! I have already started planning my set-up and strategy for next year.

-Any advice for someone thinking about doing it next year?

- Install new brake pads before the race. The descents are so long and fast that sometimes all you can do is hold the brakes and try to stay on the trail. Be ready for some fast descending. Everyone talks about the climbs, but the descents were just as tough.

- Don’t try to win the race in the first 15 miles. Pacing is key and having some energy left for the final climbs makes the race much more enjoyable.

- Use the aid stations to your advantage. They were spaced 15-20 miles apart and had everything you needed; food, maintenance, enthusiasm. I had heard that they were well stocked, so I limited the amount of food I carried with me and still got everything I needed.

Jeremiah Bishop may have won this race, but Eddie will be back next year. Oh yeah, and we'll see you again in a few weeks JB.

Jeremiah Bishop may have won this race, but Eddie will be back next year. Oh yeah, and we’ll be seeing you again in a few weeks JB.

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