5 Things We Can’t Wait For In 2015

2015

1. SRAM Electronic, New Drivetrain Players

Making a return from last year’s list: SRAM electronic drivetrains. This year we made the switch to electronic drivetrains on our personal bikes—with Campagnolo Record EPS and Shimano Ultegra Di2, respectively. We couldn’t be happier, but are increasingly intrigued by SRAM’s near-mythical wireless electronic shifting system. It’s said to be introduced in 2015, and we’re definitely looking forward to see how it stacks up against the more traditional wired systems.

2015 is also rumored to see the introduction of an FSA electronic drivetrain, and some sort of drivetrain from Rotor (fabled Spanish maker of aluminum cranks, power meters, and Q-Rings oval-shaped chainrings), although whether it will be mechanical or electronic is still unknown. This will give the drivetrain market its first real shake up since 2006 when SRAM introduced their Force groupset.

 

2. New Helmets From Performance

2015 will see a raft of new helmet brands and models hitting our proverbial and literal shelves. We can’t tell you exactly what they are yet, but we can say that they grace the heads of some today’s best professional racers. Also coming soon will be the Smith Overtake—which we’re super pumped about.

 

Here's a small hint...

Here’s a small hint…

 

3. Shimano XTR M9050 Di2

Di2 on a mountain bike? Sure, why not. Electronic shifting systems have already more than proved themselves on the road, so it’s about time that they made the switch to the trails. We got to take a quick peak at it at some of the trade shows and it looked mighty impressive. Shimano XTR is already arguably one of the finest mountain bike components groupsets available, so Di2 should only make it that much better.

The new XTR 9050 Di2 looks pretty amazing

The new XTR 9050 Di2 looks pretty amazing

 

4. Performance Custom Wheels

A long time ago, in another building far, far away, Performance was known as a one-stop shop for custom wheels. But while the wheel building machine in our warehouse has long since been shut down, we’ve never stopped thinking about the perfect hoops. So over the course of the past year we got to working on how we could start making the wheels we really want to ride, and providing them to customers at a great value.

In 2015 we’re excited to announce that we’ll be returning to the custom-built wheel game. We’ve curated a carefully selected wheel collection, and carefully matched up what we think are some perfect rim/hub/spoke combinations. The result are some unique and exciting wheels from Stan’s, Shimano, and Reynolds, custom-built only for Performance Bicycle.

 

New custom-built wheels, like these Shimano Ultegra hubs to Mavic Open Pro rims, will be arriving throughout 2015

New custom-built wheels, like these Shimano Ultegra hubs to Mavic Open Pro rims, will be arriving throughout 2015

 

5. New Clothing Offerings

It’s not just wheels that we gave some serious thought to this year. Clothing was also high on our agenda—more specifically clothes for those rides that are more about the destination than the ride itself (think riding around town, touring, bike camping, etc…).

We’ve been hard at work designing, picking out fabrics, and testing and are pretty pleased with what we came up with. We can’t show them to you just yet, but keep an eye out around February.

We can't show you too much...but here's a sneak peak of some new clothes in the works

We can’t show you too much…but here’s a sneak peak of some new clothes in the works

2015 Holiday Gift Inspiration

Looking for a gift for the cyclist in your life? Maybe you’re a cyclist looking for a few goodies to add to your wishlist or a “Happy Holidays to Me” package. We’ve got you covered. Our website has thousands of bike parts, clothing, and bikes to choose from. But sifting through that stuff can be a little daunting. So we’ve picked out some of our favorite stuff.

Back again this year is the 2015 Holiday Inspiration list. We polled riders around our office for the stuff that they want for the holidays.

If you’re still wondering if there’s time to get that last minute gift, don’t worry! Orders placed by 12/22 with 2nd Business Day shipping, or order placed by 12/23 with Overnight shipping will still arrive in plenty of time.

And of course our retail stores will remain open until 12/24.

 

 

Sarah

Marketing department

Triathlete, aspiring mountain biker, weeknight concert goer

  1. Garmin Forerunner 910 XT GPS watch with Premium Heart Rate Monitor
  2. Giro Women’s Feather Mountain Bike Helmet
  3. Performance Women’s Thermal II Tights
  4. Performance Cabot Softshell Gloves
  5. Performance Women’s Tone Henley Long Sleeve Jersey

DREAM GIFT: Grand Canyon Connector Bike Trip– Cedar City, UT to Tempe, AZ. Hits Zion National Park and the Grand Canyon

sarah

Eddie 

Accessories Buyer

Mountain biker, CX up-and-comer, one-time pig owner

  1. Bell Super 2 MTB Helmet
  2. Giro Terraduro MTB Shoes
  3. CamelBak M.U.L.E. NV Hydration Pack
  4. Kuat NV 2-Bike Hitch Rack
  5. Schwalbe Hans Dampf Tires

DREAM GIFT: Week-long trip to Whistler, BC

Eddie

Brian

Social Media Team

Roadie, unrepentant Italophile, coffee enthusiast

  1. Castelli Gabba Convertible Jacket
  2. Bell Star Pro Helmet
  3. Smith Pivlock Overdrive Sunglasses
  4. Louis Garneau Course Thermal Bib Shorts
  5. Skratch Labs Apples and Cinnamon Hydration Mix

DREAM GIFT: Trip to the Pinarello Gran Fondo in Trentino, Italy

 Brian

Holiday Hack: DIY Bike Wheel Wreath and Ornaments

With the holidays coming up, it’s time to start digging through your spare parts bin to create some Christmas decor that shows off your cycling spirit. It only takes a few minutes to pull off these bike-inspired designs – and you’ll end up with the coolest decorations on the block!

5 Steps to Create a Bicycle Wheel Wreath

Christmas Bike Wheel WreathThis twist on the classic wreath couldn’t be more simple to put together. All that you need to make it happen is an old wheel, some decorative garland, a string of christmas lights, some zip ties, and a big red bow or a few ornaments. Click on the images below to view the step-by-step instructions:

2 Easy Chain Link Ornaments

christmas_bike_decor_025

Here’s a quick and easy way to make some cool little ornaments out of those leftover bits of chain that you always end up with after installing a new one. Click on the images below to view the step-by-step instructions:

Cassette Tree Topper and Ornaments

Do you have a pile of old cassettes gathering dust in the corner? Stack them on top of the tree to make an unusual tree topper, or just pull out individual cogs and hang them up as ornaments. Just make sure to clean them off first! Click on the images below to view more:

Post your cycling holiday decoration ideas in the comments!

Simple and Fun Bikes

Getting on a bike and riding is easy, to be sure, but riding a bike over great distances or for maximum performance can be a real challenge. Whether you’re participating in an important charity ride, or if you are planning on a full season of road racing, you need to set goals, plan your training around those goals, and stay on track to accomplish them. If this is your game, there are lots of great choices to help meet your needs, like the Fuji Transonic road bike or the GT Helion full suspension all-mountain rig.

However, in your quest to improve your performance, it’s easy to lose sight of the reasons why you wanted to ride your bike in the first place. This is fun, remember? Take a day or two and put down the Garmin, stop posting pictures on Instagram, and ride simply for the love of it. Coast your bike. Coast a lot. Now, try taking your hands of the handlebar; that feels good, right?

One of the many wonderful things about the age of bike specialization is that every bike is designed to meet a certain need. We’ve handpicked a few of our favorite bikes that are designed to deliver as much fun and good feelings as you can handle on a Saturday afternoon.

Access Chinook Charlie and Bravo Fat Bikes               

These are our bikes for us. No really. One of the great things about riding bikes all the time and working around them is that we also get to design them. The Access Chinook Charlie and Bravo Fat Bikes have a Shaquille O’Neal sized tire footprint with the strength to match. They’re built with high quality parts, but more importantly, they’re built to float over sand and snow like no other style of bike can

     

    

Shop All Fat Bikes

Diamondback Apex Mountain Bikes

No mountain bike is as simple to use or as versatile as a hardtail (no rear suspension), but not all hardtails are equal. We love the Diamondback Apex series because they stay true to the heritage of hardtails while adding a modern spin: the Apex matches frame sizes with wheel sizes. That means the frame sizes that are Extra Small and Small have 27.5” wheels and sizes Medium, Large and Extra Large have 29” wheels. The result is a bike that fits your body more appropriately  and more fun because of it. That’s why these bikes are aptly named Right Fit bikes.

Want to learn more about wheel sizes and the difference they make? Learn about 27.5” here. Learn about 29ers here.

Fuji Absolute Flat Bar Bikes

The Fuji Absolute is a flat bar road bike that is among the most popular sold in the U.S. Thanks to its non-aggressive, easy riding style, it’s pretty much the perfect bike for cyclists who would rather see the sights and enjoy the ride in their everyday clothing than get all dressed up in lycra for a road ride. The Absolute is ideal for just about everything on a road; especially having fun.

The Absolute series of bikes all feature a durable and lightweight frame, with either a carbon fiber or a high tensile steel fork that helps absorb road noise and chatter, while increasing comfort. The flat bar setup gives the rider a more upright position for greater comfort and improved stability and visibility.

Even the shortest ride can have an incident. Be prepared with these 11 must-have emergency items.

GT Transeo Hybrid Bikes

Some of us just need an excuse to leave our cars in the garage and enjoy the simple pleasure of feeling the sun and the wind against our faces more often. Sound good? It did to us and GT supplied the means to unlock all of those stress-free feelings with the GT Transeo hybrid bike series. With plenty of comfortable standover height, front suspension, and easy to use shifting, the GT Transeo bikes are loaded with comfortable features to make every neighborhood or park ride enjoyable.

 

Even new bikes make some strange noises. Curious about what’s going on down there? Check out our article What’s that Noise? to learn more.

Schwinn Beach Cruisers

The Schwinn brand is over 100 years old, making it one of the oldest bike brands in existence. Today, they continue to churn out great bikes, but their beach cruisers have always held a soft spot in our hearts. With great colors and unique styling, there’s sure to be a Schwinn cruiser that matches your personal tastes.

 

Not sure which bike is right for you? Check out our 10 FAQ on how to pick the best bike for your needs here.

These are just a few of our favorites, but if we talked about them all, we wouldn’t have time to go for a ride ourselves (it’s almost lunch time and the bikes are calling us). Do you have any personal bike favorites? We’d love to hear which bikes put a smile on your face in the comments section below.

2015 Exclusive Bike Preview

Just in time for the holidays, we’ve managed to get our hands on three new bikes that just showed up at our headquarters. Two road offerings from Ridley and Scattante, and a brand-new mountain bike from Charge. These bikes are all exclusive to Performance, so you won’t find them anywhere else.

 

RIDLEY ORION

First up we have the Ridley Orion. The Orion is one of Ridley’s most successful bikes ever, and was the foundation for what would become the pro-level Ridley Fenix. Built with 24-ton high modulus carbon fiber diamond-shaped tubing for incredible strength and rigidity while riding, the Orion is bike that’s been proven again and again on the cobbles of Flanders and Northern France (it even has a sticker that says “Tested On Pave”—and they really mean that).

The Ridley Orion—exclusively available from Performance Bicycle—is outfitted with 11-speed Shimano Ultegra 6800 shifters and rear derailleur, with a new 5800-series 105 front derailleur. FSA supplies the crank, and Ridley’s own 4Za brand supplies the stem, handlebars, seatpost and saddle.

This is a great bike for an aspiring racer, a club rider, or someone who wants one bike that can do it all. With a race-proven pedigree, high performance parts, and an all-day endurance geometry, the Orion is a bike that will provide a smooth, comfortable, and fast ride.

 

 

 SCATTANTE CFR ELITE

Next up we have the Scattante CFR Elite. Classic black and a touch of what we’ll call future-blue; the Scattante CFR Elite features a balanced Shimano 105 11-speed build on a gorgeous carbon frame set. The frame furnishes a tapered head tube for added control and stiffness and internally routed cables offer clean, modern style. A full carbon fork and steerer simultaneously lightens the front end and dampens road vibration.

Outfitted with Shimano’s new 5800 11-speed 105, you know you’ll get great, race-proven performance in your shifting. Descended from the pro-level Dura-Ace 9000 and Ultegra 6800 groupsets, 5800 brings updated ergonomics and functionality at an outstanding value. The ScMT CFR LE frame provides a stiff, stable, and lightweight ride platform that make the miles fly by while keeping you comfortable on those long rides.

The Scattante CFR Elite is perfect for the rider who’s looking for high performance at a great value.

 

CHARGE COOKER

Finally, the all-new Charge Cooker is one of the best aluminum 29er’s we’ve seen in a long time. Charge is always keeping classic and stylish, but the 2015 Cooker—exclusively from Performance—takes their signature flair to a whole new level.

The Cooker rocks a lightweight and durable 6061 Series butted aluminum frame with a tapered head tube that is rigid enough to withstand any trail, and the RockShox 30 GOLD TK fork assists by offering 100 mm of travel in the front to give you confidence during descent and features Solo Air technology that allows you to fill both the positive and negative air spring chambers of the suspension through a single Schrader valve, making fork adjustments a cinch.

The Cooker drivetrain also consists of handpicked Shimano components, including Shimano SLX shifters to filter through the 20 gearing options. A Shimano Deore front derailleur and Shimano XT Shadow Plus rear derailleur promote responsive shifting by sucking up slack and preserve the pivots for greater durability over the long-term. The Shimano BR-M355 hydraulic disc brake system is reliable in all weather conditions, provides control in the corners, and excellent stopping power when obstacles get a little too close for comfort.

Simplicity is the name of the game here, so you’re a seasoned pro looking for a durable, do-it-all aluminum 29er, or a newer rider looking for a bike that’s lightweight, stable, and can brush off a crash or two, the Cooker is the ride for you.

 

Cyclists Guide To Surviving The Holidays – 2015

Thanksgiving_17

Next week begins the Great American Holiday Extravaganza, the time of year where most Americans travel to see family, pack on extra pounds, and generally have a good time. But in the midst of all this revelry, what’s a cyclist to do? All that travel makes it tough to ride, and all that food can make hard-won weight loss gains evaporate in an instant.

Unfortunately, there are no easy answers here (at least none that won’t end with a high probability of being served divorce papers), but there are a few tricks and tips we can use to stay fit, keep the pounds off, and enjoy the holidays.

1. Try To Ride Early

Even if you have your bike, getting away from family during the holidays can be a pretty tall order. Try riding early, before you’ll be missed. Plus, your in-laws might be impressed when you show up for breakfast, having already gotten a workout in…or not—but you’ll definitely feel better.

2. Alternatives

That ride not going to happen? Try going for a run or doing some core work instead. Running and core work usually takes less time than a run, and all you need to pack is a pair of shoes and some shorts or sweats. Plus, since you won’t be going as far, you don’t have to worry about getting lost on unfamiliar roads. Running will also give you plenty of time to think about how much you miss being back on the bike.

3. Watch Where You Sit

The Thanksgiving and Holiday feasts are unavoidable, but studies show you can help avoid those extra holiday pounds by trying to sit as far from the snacks as possible to prevent mindless eating. Although if your house is anything like ours, that could be easier said than done.

4. Pick Your Favorites

Instead of going all in at dessert time, try setting yourself the goal of only eating what you’ll truly enjoy. Not that we have anything against pecan pie, but we’d rather enjoy an extra slice of pumpkin instead.

5. Drinks

If you’re trying to lose weight this coming year, or have vain hopes of staying at race weight all year long, then watch what you drink. Whenever possible, choose something no- or low-calorie like water or a sugarless electrolyte drink. Instead of beer, try drinking wine or spirits (just not in the same quantities) for that holiday cheer without the pounds. Avoid eggnog like the plague, and lay off the soda.

6. Go Easy On Yourself

Even if you bring your bike with you, don’t worry about it if you don’t make it out for a ride or fail utterly in your attempts to curb your appetite. There are more important things in life than riding bikes, and worse sins than forgoing the diet for a few days. Think of this as a time to reconnect with loved ones, especially family you might not get to see very often, and enjoy yourself. There will be plenty of time for dieting and riding in the coming year.

Good luck you guys, and happy holidays

Good luck, you guys

5 Ways To Stay Warm On Cold Rides

Here we go again…looks like the Polar Vortex has descended upon us once again. We don’t know about you, but so long as we don’t get one of our famous, downhome Carolina Ice Storms, we’ll keep riding outside as much as we can.

Now, you wouldn’t think a bunch of Southerners would know much about riding in the cold, but most of us actually grew up riding, training and racing in places like Vermont, Chicago, Pennsylvania, and Portland (Oregon, not Maine– which is a whole other animal), so we’ve learned a few things over the years about riding in the wet, the cold, and the snow.

So here it is: 5 Ways To Stay Warm on Cold Rides.

1. Layer Up

Using layered cycling clothing can help you adjust your temperature to suit the ride and the conditions. You can pretty much layer every part of your clothing system as the conditions warrant, from your feet all the way to your head. Click here for our guide to layering.

PRO TIP #1: No matter how well you think you’ve layer up on top, always bring a wind jacket or vest with you in case conditions take a turn for the worse. #1B is to bring some knee warmers on super cold days– if your knees get cold you can put them on over (but preferably under) your tights for extra coverage.

PRO TIP #2: Spare arm warmers, spare gloves or liners, a spare hat, and base layer can pack up small in a plastic bag that fits easily into a jersey pocket. On long rides, it gives you the option of changing out sweaty, damp garments for warm, dry ones.

PRO TIP #3: Don’t use super thick cycling socks with your cycling shoes. Instead, layer your overshoes as needed, putting insulated ones closer to the foot, covered by wind/waterproof ones.

Layering up is a great way to make sure you can a stay warm, and adjust your core temperature as you go

Layering up is a great way to make sure you can a stay warm, and adjust your core temperature as you go

2. Hot Water Bottle

Using an insulated water bottle filled with some warm tea or Skratch Labs Apples and Cinnamon hydration mix (which is absolutely delicious, by the way) can take the edge off a very cold ride. This is a tip that the pro’s use during early season races like Milan-San Remo to stay warm (check out a video here)

Make like the pro's, and use some warm tea to hydrate on your winter rides

Make like the pro’s, and use some warm tea to hydrate on your winter rides (Orica-GreenEdge)

3. Eat Enough

In the winter, you burn more calories on the bike than during the summer. Not only are you using fuel to exercise, but also to stay warm. That means that during the winter you should fuel up with a healthy breakfast like oatmeal, and then bring plenty of bars, chews or gels to eat while riding. This will give you plenty of carbs to keep your body warm and prevent the dreaded bonk—which could mean serious trouble if you’re far from home on a cold winter’s day.

Eating a solid, healthy breakfast, and having plenty of food for the ride will help prevent you bonking

Eating a solid, healthy breakfast, and having plenty of food for the ride will help prevent you bonking

4. Mix In Intervals

If you’re really feeling the cold, trying mixing in some intervals to bring up your body temperature. You can either 1) pick a target a good distance away and ride as hard as you can until you reach it, or 2) go by time, and ride as hard as you can for about a minute. Just make sure you don’t go so hard that you start sweating a lot, which can just make the problem worse.

Riding a few hard intervals is a great way to get your body temperature back up

Riding a few hard intervals is a great way to get your body temperature back up

5. Take a Rest

We usually like to plan our long, meandering winter rides with a destination in mind—usually a restaurant or café with warm drinks and food. But it’s OK to take a break at any time if you’re feeling cold, chilled, or just tired. Stop at a gas station, coffee shop, café, whatever, warm up and take a breather.

Go in and get warm, grab some hot tea or coffee, and eat a cookie.

PRO TIP #1: If you’re feeling the chill from a damp clothing, you can use your rest stop to change into your spare base layer, spare gloves or liners, and hat. That way you can go back out into the cold feeling dry and warm.

PRO TIP #2: If your toes are feeling very cold on your ride, see if you can get some aluminum foil or a foil food wrapper, and wrap up your toes. It’s not the most comfortable thing, but it does provide some additional insulation.

PRO TIP #3: Ask if the coffee shop or restaurant can refill your water bottles with hot water.

When you start feeling cold or chilled, go ahead and head indoors to warm up

When you start feeling cold or chilled, go ahead and head indoors to warm up

Real Advice: Setting Up Your Trainer Room

trainer-image

1. Pick the Room

Even trainers that claim to be “ultra-quiet” are still going to generate enough noise to annoy someone in an adjacent room. Pick a room that’s separated from others in the house, such as a basement, garage, or spare bedroom. Make sure you have room to set up the trainer and angle it toward your entertainment of choice. And remember folks—make sure that floor is level-ish. An uneven floor can make the trainer rock, putting a ton of stress on your hips (no good) and the bike frame (really no good).

 

2. Sweat Catching

Since you’re not going to be riding anywhere, there will be no air moving on you. That means you’re going to sweat more. To avoid ruining the carpet or hardwood, set up a trainer mat or towel underneath your bike. To avoid ruining your bike (specifically the headset and BB bearings), use a sweat catcher or hang a towel over your bike.

Using a sweat net or towel can help preserve the life of your compoents

Using a sweat net or towel can help preserve the life of your compoents

3. Cooling

Since riding the trainer gets super-hot, it’s a good idea to set up a fan to keep from overheating. Even a cheap mini tabletop fan can make a world of difference. Using a fan doesn’t preclude following Step 2—you’re still going to sweat like a demon.

 

Not sure what kind of trainer to get? Check out our guide.

 

4. Entertainment

Riding the trainer with nothing to do can get really, really boring really, really fast. Make sure you have a TV, tablet, or computer to watch a movie or do a structured work out.

PRO TIP: Since there trainer is loud and you’ll have a fan running, if you’re in a domestic living situation or have housemates, it is generally considered polite to invest a couple of bucks in a headphone extension cord or some wireless headphones so you’re not tempted to crank the TV volume.

Using headphones can help maintain domestic harmony

Using headphones can help maintain domestic harmony

5. At Hand

Set up a stool or some medium height shelves next to your bike. It should be at about a height where you can reach it comfortable while seated in the saddle. This will ensure that your remotes, computer mouse, gels, spare water bottle, spare towel, etc… are all easily at hand.

 

6. Be Prepared

The trainer is usually more demanding than an outdoor workout. Not only do you have the increased resistance of the unit itself, but heat buildup and a tough structured workout can really take it out of you. For an hour long trainer session, you should have 3 water bottles (2 of them filled a hydration drink) and some gels to keep your energy levels up and avoid dehydration.

 

Build A Home Gym On A Budget

Here’s a fun fact: you can build a pretty comprehensive home gym for under $250. As the days get shorter, darker, and colder a lot of workouts that used to be done outside have to get moved inside. We’re pretty hardy winter warriors, but there’s weather even we won’t go out into.

So when one of those famous Carolina ice storms descends upon Chapel Hill, we break out the following equipment to get in a full, comprehensive workout to stay in shape, stay limber, and cross train through the winter months.

 

CARDIO

Indoor Cycling Trainer (~$149.99-$1,899)

The indoor trainer is an amazing piece of equipment. Even a budget-priced model can deliver a hard, lung busting workout. Simply clamp your road or mountain bike into it, get on, and start pedaling. Sure, it can be fairly monotonous, but a quick Youtube search for ‘cycling trainer workout’  can yield plenty of tough, structured workouts to help you get the most out of your time.

Check out our guide to cycling trainers here.

 

At only $149.99, the Travel Trac Comp trainer is a great value on an excellent workout

At only $149.99, the Travel Trac Comp trainer is a great value on an excellent workout

STRENGTH/FLEXIBILITY

Trainer Mat ($49.99)

This is one of the most versatile fitness items we’ve ever owned. It’s designed to go under your bike while in the trainer to help dampen noise and catch dripping sweat. But we also use it for yoga, core workouts, pushups/sit ups, and more.

The trainer mat is a versatile piece of equipment, ideal for using with the trainer, for yoga, or strength training

The trainer mat is a versatile piece of equipment, ideal for using with the trainer, for yoga, or strength training

 Resistance Bands, Kettle Bells, or Fit Balls (~$29.99-$79.99 for a set)

We used to have a pretty comprehensive set of free weights (in fact, they might still be in the basement somewhere), but these days we mostly just use a resistance bands and kettle bells for our workouts. Resistance bands can be used to build strength, enhance flexibility, and improve your overall fitness, while kettle bells are excellent for strengthening muscles we don’t use much during cycling.

*We recommend speaking with a personal trainer or coach before beginning any weight or resistance training to ensure proper exercise form and avoid injury

 

RECOVERY

Foam Roller ($17.99-$39.99)

The foam roller has become an essential tool for us. Using the foam roller can help loosen up tight muscles and adhesions, keeping you loose and flexible which makes you more resistant to injury.

The foam roller is one of the best recovery tools available to any athlete

The foam roller is one of the best recovery tools available to any athlete

 

TOTAL FOR A WHOLE GYM: $249.96

So lets hear it, did we miss anything? What’s your favorite piece of home workout equipment? Tell us in the comments section.

Fall/Winter Cycling Gloves

As colder weather descends upon most of the country, most of us starting thinking about cold weather gear like arm and leg warmers, vests, and jackets. Sometimes we overlook one of the most important cycling garments though: the humble glove.

Having a good, and varied assortment of gloves is essential for riding from October through April in most places.

Since the temperatures can vary so much as the seasons change, it’s almost impossible to find one glove that can keep you covered from the cool morning rides of October to the frozen depths of February.

One good way to maximize your investment though is to think of your gloves as a system that can be either worn alone or combined and layered to match the conditions.

 

LIGHTWEIGHT GLOVES

Lightweight gloves are the basis of the glove layering system. They can be worn on their own on cool, but not cold rides, or layered under thicker gloves for additional warmth.

1. Glover Liners

These thin wool or synthetic gloves are primarily designed to wick away sweat and provide some thermal warmth.

BEST FOR: Cool days; layered underneath midweight and heavyweight gloves

Glove liners wick away sweat and help trap in heat

Glove liners wick away sweat and help trap in heat

2. Long Fingered Glove

Long fingered gloves aren’t insulated, but provide coverage for the fingers on cooler days.

BEST FOR: Cool days

 

Long fingered gloves can be ideal when the day will be cool, but not cold

Long fingered gloves can be ideal when the day will be cool, but not cold

MIDWEIGHT

The midweight glove’s primary job is to provide thermal insulation on cold days. They can be worn by themselves, or layered with a glove liner for colder days.

1. Softshell Glove

Softshell gloves is made from a midweight material that are wind- and water-resistant. The usually have a brushed fleece backing that provides excellent thermal insulation.

Softshell gloves are usually wind- and water-resistant for protection from the elements

Softshell gloves are usually wind- and water-resistant for protection from the elements

BEST FOR: Cold, wet and windy conditions

2. Light Insulated Glove

Lightly insulated gloves are usually made with a thin layer of insulating material that does an excellent job of holding in heat on colder days.

BEST FOR: Cold, calm days

The Performance Tok glove is insulated for protection in cold weather

The Performance Tok glove is insulated for protection in cold weather

 

 

HEAVYWEIGHT

Heavyweight gloves are designed to keep your hands dry, warm and protected on the coldest of days. They can be worn by themselves, or layered with glove liners or even midweight gloves on the heaviest days. It is usually advisable to buy heavyweight gloves a size larger than you normally need them.

1. Heavy Insulated Glove

These gloves usually feature multiple layers of insulation, windproof membranes and water-resistant finishes to protect your hands on very cold days.

BEST FOR: Very cold, windy days

Heavyweight insulated gloves can keep your hands warm and dry on the coldest days

Heavyweight insulated gloves can keep your hands warm and dry on the coldest days

 

2. Split Finger Glove

These gloves are best for extremely cold days. They maximize warmth by putting your fingers closer to each other, feature heavy insulation, and have windproof and water-resistant membranes

BEST FOR: Extreme cold

 

Split finger gloves are ideal for extreme cold when maximum warmth is needed

Split finger gloves are ideal for extreme cold when maximum warmth is needed

3. Waterproof Overglove

The waterproof overglove is best for days when mother nature just refuses to cooperate. Layer them over mid- or heavyweight gloves to keep your hands dry and warm in the harshest conditions

BEST FOR: Extreme conditions

Waterproof overgloves are designed for the most extreme conditions

Waterproof overgloves are designed for the most extreme conditions

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