National Bike Month Contests – Last Chance

National Bike Month may be drawing to a close, but that doesn’t mean that you can’t end the month with a brand new bike! As part of this month-long celebration of all things cycling, we’ve partnered with a few websites to give away some cool new rides.

If you surf over to Bullz-Eye.com, you can enter to win a 2011 Scattante F-330 Fitness Bike in their Bike to Work Month Performance Bicycle Giveaway:

Over at Shape.com, you can enter to win a 2011 Scattante W-330 Women’s Road Bike (designed with women’s specific geometry):

If that’s not enough, you should also be sure to enter our very own 100th Store Give-A-Way, a celebration of our landmark 100th store (plus National Bike Month, of course).

When you enter to win, you’ll have the chance to take home 1 of 100 $100 gift cards, a Pearl Izumi gear kit, or a brand new 2011 GT Sensor 9r Expert Mountain Bike:

These are all great bikes, and winning one would be a great way to close out National Bike Month in style! But if you don’t see a bike or prize you want to win, or you just don’t want to wait, then be sure to check out our huge Memorial Day Savings event, going on now through Memorial Day, online and in our stores! You’ll save an extra 15% off everything, including items already on sale (some exclusions apply)!

Wordless Wednesday

2011 Giro d’Italia – Riding in the Vittoria neutral support car

Eric, one of the buyers here at Performance HQ, was lucky enough to fly to Italy last week to check out a few days of the Giro d’Italia, and he shot some amazing video footage that we’re sure you won’t  find anywhere else.  Eric was able to score a seat in one of the Vittoria neutral support cars during Stage 9, which ended high atop smoldering Mount Etna, and he was doubly lucky to be in the car that followed the leaders for the entire stage!

Eric was there, video camera in hand, to watch the breakaway, along with the mad dance of cars, motorcycles and fans that accompanied them as they led the way up the mountain.  And he also had a front-row seat as Alberto Contador launched the attack that would put him in the pink jersey at the end of day (the famed maglia rosa of the overall race leader).

So enjoy our behind-the-scenes view into a day in the life of a Grand Tour stage, as seen from inside the race:

Product Profile – Burley Travoy Urban Bike Trailer

Since today is National Bike to Work Day, the culmination of Bike to Work Week, we thought it was the perfect opportunity for a product profile of the new Burley Travoy Urban Bike Trailer.  If you’ve been commuting by bike this month, you have probably already tried hauling your gear with a set of panniers, or in a backpack or a classic messenger bag. While those are all good commuting options, the Travoy bike trailer is a great alternative to transport just about anything – from a week’s worth of groceries, to a change of clothes for the office, or up to 60lbs of cargo!

Here David demonstrates how the Travoy Trailer hitches effortlessly to your seatpost and travels at a 45° angle, redistributing the load’s weight for easier riding and offering better stability than standard panniers or backpacks.

Setup is quick and easy, as all you need to do to get up and running is to clamp the trailer quick release bracket to your seatpost, and then mount or remove the trailer itself by pulling a little spring-loaded arm out of the way of the hitch pin.

And did we mention that the Travoy trailer can carry up to 60lbs! You can carry some serious loads in the included tote bag:

The tote bag has a nice wide opening and sturdy construction, but you can also upgrade to a waterproof Burley Dry Bag if the forecast calls for heavy downpours.

And when you’re done with your commute, just twist the 2 grips and fold the Travoy down into a convenient size for storage (you can even store the folded Travoy in its own tote bag). The whole setup weighs less than 10lbs, so you can easily just bring it inside with you when you get where you’re going.

Check out the Travoy in action in this video by Burley:

If you’re serious about commuting by bike, take a look at the Burley Travoy Urban Bike Trailer - it’s a great option to haul your gear in comfort and style.

Bike to Work Week Employee Profile: Tony DeRubeis

Here’s our last Bike to Work Week Employee Profile about one of the many commuters who ride to work here at Performance HQ. They ride different bikes and different routes, but they’ve all got great advice on how to make your commute easier and more fun!

What’s your name?

Tony DeRubeis .

What do you do at Performance?

Spin Doctor Pro Bike Build Coordinator.

How often do you ride to work?

1-2 times per week.

How far do you ride?

42 miles round trip.

What bike do you ride?

I ride a Scattante XRL cross frame with a Frankenbike parts kit.

Why do you commute by bike/what’s your favorite part of commuting by bike?

It’s a good workout, plus it’s more enjoyable than driving, it saves money and it’s better for the environment!

Any advice for someone who’s thinking about commuting by bike?

Any distance commuting by bike is better than driving – driving half of your commute and biking half is better than driving the whole thing.  And commuting by bike is like stealing time – if your 30 minute drive takes 60 minutes to ride, you get a 60 minute workout while only taking 30 minutes out of your day.

Bike to Work Week Employee Profile: Chris Danz

Here’s another Employee Profile about one of the many commuters who ride to work here at Performance HQ, in honor of Bike to Work Week (May 16-20).  They ride different bikes and different routes, but they’ve all got great advice on how to make your commute easier and more fun!

What’s your name?

Christopher Danz.

What do you do at Performance?

I’m a Merchandising Assistant in the Hardgoods Components division.

How often do you ride to work?

Most days.

How far do you ride?

17 miles each way.

What bike do you ride?

I usually commute on my trusty GT Peace Tour.

Why do you commute by bike/what’s your favorite part of commuting by bike?

I love not being in a car. Cagers (people who spend half of their lives in their steel cages) are always so angry, I like not being a part of that culture. I race in endurance mountain bike events so the extra training time that I don’t have to take from my family time is also key.

Any advice for someone who’s thinking about commuting by bike?

Just go for it! For me, I can’t value my waterproof panniers enough (I use Ortlieb Back-Roller Classic Panniers). I also always keep a good rain jacket in there as I never know when I’m going to be caught in an unexpected storm. Otherwise, just riding is most of my secret. The more you do it, the easier it gets as it starts to become part of your routine and your fitness increases.

Bike to Work Week Employee Profile: Tom Vasiliauskas

Here’s another Employee Profile about one of the many commuters who ride to work here at Performance HQ, in honor of Bike to Work Week (May 16-20).  They ride different bikes and different routes, but they’ve all got great advice on how to make your commute easier and more fun!

What’s your name?

Tom Vasiliauskas.

What do you do at Performance?

Merchandising Manager.

How often do you ride to work?

About once a week.

How far do you ride?

22 miles round trip.

What bike do you ride?

Scattante Five-Sixty frame, from 2008 I believe (this is a popular bike for commuters here, but for 2011 it’s called the X-570).

Why do you commute by bike/what’s your favorite part of commuting by bike?

I ride for several reasons: to get some additional riding in during my busy day, to save gas, and because it’s always a GREAT way to wake up in the morning. I love riding with lights during sunrise.

Any advice for someone who’s thinking about commuting by bike?

I recommend using at least 2 tail lights for additional safety.

Bike to Work Week Employee Profile: David Wilkes

Here’s another Employee Profile about one of the many commuters who ride to work here at Performance HQ, in honor of Bike to Work Week (May 16-20).  They ride different bikes and different routes, but they’ve all got great advice on how to make your commute easier and more fun!

What’s your name?

David Wilkes.

What do you do at Performance?

Web Developer.

How often do you ride to work?

Every day that ends in “Y”.

How far do you ride?

1 mile, thus the answer to the previous question. I mean does it really make sense to get in a car to go 1 mile?

What bike do you ride?

I ride my Scattante X-560 cyclocross bike (the 2011 model is the X-570).

Why do you commute by bike/what’s your favorite part of commuting by bike?

I live way too close to drive! Plus it’s just great to get outside and be on the bike.

Any advice for someone who’s thinking about commuting by bike?

Pack extra socks especially on rainy and wet days.

Bike to Work Week Employee Profile: John Buleza

Since today is the first day of Bike to Work Week (May16-20), we thought it was the perfect time to start a series of Employee Profiles about a few of the many commuters who ride to work here at Performance HQ. They ride different bikes and different routes, but they’ve all got great advice on how to make your commute easier and more fun!

What’s your name?

John Buleza.

What do you do at Performance?

Vice President of Direct Marketing.

How often do you ride to work?

Usually 2-3 days a week.

How far do you ride?

9 miles each way.

What bike do you ride?

Fuji Roubaix ACR 2.0 road bike.

Why do you commute by bike/what’s your favorite part of commuting by bike?

I ride for fitness, to do my part for the environment, and for the gas savings!

Any advice for someone who’s thinking about commuting by bike?

Take a trial run on a weekend to make sure that you’re comfortable with the route and to see how long it takes you to ride. Then start one day a week and build up to riding one more day, and then another, and then another…. Also, plan ahead to make your commute easier – bring in clothing/food on “off” days when you aren’t riding to work.

Tour Trip Profile: David Martin

Have you been watching the Giro d’Italia and wondering what it’s like to experience a Grand Tour in person? Then don’t miss your chance to see the action up close and personal with a once-in-a-lifetime cycling experience, through our partnership with premiere bicycling tour operator, Europeds!

We’re proud to offer exclusive access to the 2011 Europeds Tour Trip, a dream trip for any cyclist. The 7 day/6 night trip includes five nights on the summit of the fabled Alpe d’Huez, the chance to watch three action-packed Tour stages in person, along with the opportunity to go on some of the most breathtaking bike rides you’ll ever experience.

To give you more insight into the trip, we’ve put together a little Q&A with the head of Europeds, David Martin, a man who knows his cycling and his French cuisine!

How long have you worked for/run Europeds?

I’ve worked at Europeds since 1996. I started as a guide, working primarily in France. In 2000, I bought the company and transitioned to more managing than guiding.

How many times have you been to the Tour?

I’ve been to the Tour de France around 14 times. This year (2011) will be my 12th year of guiding trips to the Tour.

What’s your favorite part of leading trips to the Tour?

To be honest, the best part about leading trips to the Tour is being able to be at the Tour. It’s just the greatest and craziest sporting event ever. The atmosphere, the mix of cultures and the drama that always unfolds makes it an event like no other.

I take pride though in being able to offer people a unique glimpse into this great event. Throughout the years I’ve learned how to best design and operate a Tour trip. The most important aspect starts with the hotels. Once you’ve secured the accommodations in a great spot, the rest is pretty easy. For this year’s Tour trip for Performance, we’ve got the best hotel location possible – literally at the top of the Alpe d’Huez. We’ll be there for 5 nights and we’ll ride every beautiful road within reach. That’s the best part about leading a Tour trip!

What’s it like riding in the Alps? Have you got a favorite ride from the Tour trip?

Riding in the Alps is the best thing in the world if you’re a cyclist. The beauty and magnitude of the climbs make it just breathtaking. On the upcoming Tour trip for Performance Bikes I’ve put together an amazing itinerary that focuses not only on some of the classic and well-known climbs, but also some lesser known yet equally as beautiful roads. We’ll get the chance to ride up the Galibier early in the morning of July 21st, the Galibier stage.

At the Alpe d’Huez, you are surrounded by all of the classic Tour de France climbs such as Galibier, Lauteret, Glandon, and the Izoard.  My favorite rides, however, are probably some of the lesser known climbs. Although some would argue that the Pyrenees are prettier, the Alps are more intense and the climbs are steeper.

One of the more beautiful roads in the area, and one that many people don’t know about is the road that goes out the back of the Alpe d’Huez. It is called Col de Sarenne. It is the most breathtaking road you will ever ride. Seriously. It is not to be ridden if you are scared of heights.

Besides the Col de Sarenne, there are a couple of other rides that are my favorite in the area, and we’ll ride them both on the Performance Tour trip. I think my favorite ride is probably this great out and back ride up to a very small village called La Berarde. It’s very cool to start the morning off with a 20 minute downhill ride off of the Alpe d’Huez. Once in the village of Bourg d’Oisans below, it’s a classic, gradual climb up to La Berarde where you can get a great meal in a small café on the side of the road. The cruise back down to the bottom of the Alpe d’Huez climb is world class, then the pain begins. The total distance for the day is about 55 miles.

What’s it like being on top of Alpe d’Huez on race day?

It’s really hard to explain what it is like at the Alpe d’Huez on race day. Think mayhem. It is one of the more exciting days you will ever experience. The energy is palpable. This year, we will most likely see between ½ million and 1 million people on the switchbacks and on the route. Being at the top, as you wait for the riders to arrive is like being at the center of the universe. This year, on July 22nd, we’ll wake up and take the day off of riding as we’ll let the pros do the riding today. Most people will probably choose to walk down the switchbacks and find a place on the hill while others will simply walk the short distance to the finish line and stake out a place among the crowds.

Have you got any favorite local food or wine specialties?

When you’re in the Alps, you have to eat Fondue. There are tons of choices for delicious, hearty Alpine cuisine. Another local favorite is a dish called “Tartiflette” – which is a gratin filled with potatoes, onions, bacon and cheese of course. Great riding food.

In terms of wine, the Alps aren’t really known for their wine, but my favorite red wine comes from the Cotes du Rhone, which is nearby. Many of the cyclists on the Tour trip tend to like beer too, but there is never a shortage of quality red wine.

Who’s your pick to win this year’s Tour?

Tough question. Much probably depends on whether or not Contador will be present, but even if he is, I suspect we could see a dark horse emerge. I’d like to say Chris Horner as he’s one of my favorite riders, but Andy Schleck is probably a good pick too. OK – truth be told, I have no idea. You’ll have to come and see for yourself.

Don’t miss your chance for the trip of a lifetime.  Book your spot on the 2011 Europeds Tour Trip today!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 121 other followers

%d bloggers like this: