Giro d’Italia Highlights: Final Weekend

The 2012 Giro d’Italia is over, and what a final weekend it was! Ryder Hesjedal became the first Canadian to ever win a Grand Tour, while also snagging the first overall Grand Tour win for Team Garmin-Barracuda. It was such an exciting final weekend that we had to corral the highlights here on our blog, just so we could enjoy the battle for the Maglia Rosa one more time.

First up was Stage 20, which included an ascent of the fearsome Mortirolo before a finishing climb up the punishing, and legendary, Stelvio. Aided by his trusty lieutenant Christian Vande Velde, Hesjedal powered a select group of GC favorites most of the way up the Stelvio in pursuit of the surprising Thomas De Gendt – who threatened to gain almost five minutes on the chasing pack of GC men. Hesjedal closed the gap to De Gendt in the final kilometers, but a cagey Joaquim Rodriguez sprinted away near the finish to gain a precious few seconds in his quest to keep the Maglia Rosa.

On the Giro’s final day, Hesjedal lined up for the final time trial 31 seconds down on Rodriguez – but in a display reminiscent of Greg LeMond beating Laurent Fignon in the final time trial of the 1989 Tour de France, Hesjedal powered his way through the time trial to best Rodriguez by a scant 16 seconds in the final tally.

What a race and what a finale to the season’s first Grand Tour – there was drama, a great storyline, and the always impressive Italian scenery. Here’s hoping that the competition for this summer’s Tour de France will be just as exciting!

Tour Devinci Build a Bike Giveaway – Factory Tour

Our friends at Devinci are very proud of their bikes and the fact that they have been designed, tested and built at their factory in Quebec, Canada since 1987. It is this reputation for designing and handcrafting extraordinary bikes that makes our 2012 Tour Devinci, Build a Bike Giveaway so interesting.

The winner of our 3-day, all-expense-paid, hands-on Devinci factory tour will get to meet Devinci staff, see how Devinci bikes are designed, tested, machined, welded and assembled and help build a Devinci bike with their own hands, from machining to assembly. To top it off, our winner will get to ride local trails, scenic road loops, or both, with Devinci staff, plus take home either a 2012 Devinci Leo SL K Road Bike or a 2012 Devinci Atlas RC 29er Mountain Bike as a souvenir!

For a sneak peek of what you might see, take a look at the series of videos about the Devinci factory in Quebec:

Producing bikes in-house allows Devinci to keep tabs on the pulse of every bike, from raw materials incubation through heat-treat processes, painting, assembly, and finished perfection:

At Devinci, the ultimate riding experience starts with hand-welded frames built by senior craftsmen:

Devinci bikes are driven by precision engineering and innovation. That’s why its team of engineers developed CNC programming and the custom tooling necessary to painstakingly fine-tune the build quality of each frame before it leaves Devinci Laboratories:

To ensure Devinci exceeds your riding expectations, each bike undergoes brutal and calculated testing before ever leaving the factory doors:

Enter the 2012 Tour Devinci, Build a Bike Giveaway now for your chance to visit Devinci‘s factory in Quebec! Contest entry dates are 4/30/12 – 5/28/12 and only one entry per person (US residents only).

Wordless Wednesday

Bike to Work Day: Portraits from our Home Office

We love to ride, so we’re pretty serious about National Bike to Work Day. Check out the collage below for just a few of the folks who pedaled in to work today at our home office here in North Carolina!

Gaynor’s Bike To Work Week Wisdom

Our Head Spin Doctor (and all-around motivator) Gaynor has been busy reminding, encouraging and cajoling everyone here at our home office to participate in National Bike to Work Week, and especially on National Bike to Work Day (Friday, May 18th). His big goal is fulfilling our “Empty Parking Lot Challenge” on Friday – an ambitious target, but we’re certainly going to give it a try! Since Gaynor is so effective at rallying the bike commuting efforts here at our home office, we thought we’d share some of the bike to work wisdom he’s used to motivate us. Hopefully you can use some of Gaynor’s wise counsel to encourage friends or coworkers to give bike commuting a try!

Reason #1: According to the Mayo Clinic, “Exercise increases your overall health and your sense of well-being, which puts more pep in your step every day. But exercise also has some direct stress-busting benefits.”

Most of us know this but how do we find the time to exercise? It’s easy – commute by bike! By cycling to work, you are scheduling 2 exercise periods each day you ride. The ride in provides a quiet time to plan your day before the confusing onslaught of details and demands. The ride home gives you time to reflect, decompress and let the tension go. You’ll be healthier, happier and more productive.

But don’t trust me! Here again from the Mayo Clinic: “Physical activity helps to bump up the production of your brain’s feel-good neurotransmitters, called endorphins. Although this function is often referred to as a runner’s high, a rousing game of tennis or a nature hike [or a bike ride] can contribute to this same feeling.

Reason #2: Biking to work saves bucks. The average American commutes 33 miles each day. The average American car gets 22 miles per gallon. Regular gas costs $3.85/gallon. Average Joe spends $29/week, $115/month and $1500/year for gas.

If you only live an easy 5 mile commute to work, you’ll still save $8.75/week (the cost a six pack of Bell’s Two Hearted Ale), $35/month and $455/year.

Reason #3: Add some adventure to your day. Shake up your routine, try something different, spice up your life. Why settle for the same-old, same-old? Become the hardy, intrepid person you really are.  Commute to work!

Reason #4: Show the doubters. Think of all the times that someone told you that you could not do it. That you were too old, too young; too big, too small; too dumb, too smart; too thin, too stout; too loud, too quiet; too brash, too timid. You’re a girl; you’re a boy! It’s too long, it’s too steep; it’s high, it’s too deep; it’s too fast. It’s too slow. Ride to work! Show ‘em you won’t be stopped!

Reason #5: Join a gang. By riding to work you are joining a select group of mostly well-adjusted, fun, happy and pleasant bike commuters.

Reason #6: Save the planet. Each year, the average passenger car on an average commute of 33 miles produces 77.1 lbs of hydrocarbons, 575 lbs of carbon monoxide, and 11,450 lbs of carbon dioxide. Aside from a little methane from too much roughage, commuting by bike produces zero pollution!

Reason #7: If you ride to work you won’t get pulled over for speeding. Ride a bike = no tickets. Drive a car = tickets.

Reason #8: Beer Pressure. Cycling dramatically improves the taste of beer, especially good beer. Ride for beer but drink responsibly.

Reason #9: Peer Pressure. Your coworkers and friends will be cycling to work. What’s your excuse when others less fit but spunkier are riding? Ride and have no excuses!

And finally…

Reason #10: Because it’s fun! When you commute by bike you have another reason to ride your bike, and what’s not to like about that?

Community Events: April Recap

April was a busy time at our over 100 stores all across the country – our store teams were busy putting on clinics, supporting rides and helping out in their local cycling communities. If you want more info about your local Performance Bicycle, check your local store page for regularly scheduled Spin Doctor clinics & group rides.

First up this month are some pictures from the Michigan Mountain Bike Patrol training held at our Novi, MI store.  Sales manager Joe Pepples of our Bloomfield Hills, MI store is a member of the bike patrol and coordinated this training session.

This Michigan Mountain Bike Patrol has a total of 18 trained patrollers across Michigan – the patrol is a volunteer organization that works to encourage safe and responsible riding.  Patrollers provide assistance to hikers, equestrians, and mountain bikers, like at the Pontiac Lake Time Trial race where the patrol was out in full force providing level 1 first aid to injured riders. Of course after the training session at our store, the patrollers did what they love to do best – go for a mountain bike ride!

Michael Morross and Jessica Maier from our Chandler, AZ store manned a booth on a windy day at the Arizona Bike Festival. A celebration of all things cycling in the state, the festival was packed with rides, a swap meet, and entertainment.

Also part of the festival was the 2012 El Tour de Mesa - as an official sponsor of El Tour, Performance Bicycle was represented by a great group of team members from our three Phoenix, AZ area stores located in: Chandler, Peoria, and Scottsdale, AZ.

We had a great presence during the ride packet pick up with members from our ChandlerPeoria, and Scottsdale stores representing Performance. We handed out samples from some of our vendors along with information on our Team Performance and Extended Service Plan programs.

Folks from our Chandler and Scottsdale stores also set up a tent at the awards area, where we showed off some of our new Fuji road bikes and Devinci mountain bikes – like the Devinci Atlas RC 29er mountain bike below.

We were out on the course as well, providing mechanical support for the El Tour de Mesa riders. We had many riders who stopped by for air, tubes, and general questions. Blake, one of our Spin Doctors, and Eric, another member of our Chandler team, were there to support the riders with both technical knowledge and shouts of encouragement!

Michael, Sales Manager of the Chandler store and sales associate Bryan Harding did double duty by riding in the 70 mile ride and then helping out afterwards at our tent during the festival. Performance showed up with a great presence and it was nice to see our customers show up and thank us for our support.

Switching gears to the west coast, Performance Bicycle was the sole provider of race day support at the 4th annual San Diego Gran Fondo ride.  Nearly 1400 riders participated in the 60 or 108 mile ride, and members from all of our San Diego, CA area stores covered the entire 108 mile course with rolling mechanical support.

Our team included associates from the La Mesa, Kearney Mesa, Sorrento Valley, Bonita, and San Diego, CA stores. They had a great time out on the course, providing flat repairs, repairing bent derailleurs, fixing chains, and performing derailleur adjustments. It was great hearing all the compliments from the riders after we helped them get on their way.

Hearing comments like “ You guys at Performance Bike are Awesome. Thank you for the support.” and “ You guys are life savers and enabled me to finish the ride” kept our team energized to provide support all day long! This was the first year that we provided this level of support for the San Diego Gran Fondo, and we had a great time getting out in the community and look forward to working with them in the future.

Staying in the San Diego, CA area, our San Diego and Kearney Mesa stores provided mechanic support at multiple rest stops for the Tour de Cure San Diego ride, where they aided dozens of participants by fixing flat tires, rubbing brakes and the like.

One great story from this event was relayed by team member Fred Robinson, who helped with mechanical support at an aid station. A long-time Performance customer who was riding in the event stopped by to thank Fred for Performance’s active role in helping her change to a healthier lifestyle, starting with her first bike purchase. And now she has just completed her first half-century!

Sticking with our busy San Diego area stores, Jake Beller from our La Mesa store and Thomas Jones from our Kearney Mesa store participated in San Diego State University‘s “Green Fest” event.  Organized by the SDSU Cycling & Triathlon Club, the festival promoted the sport of cycling to students to encourage them to ride a bike to school instead of driving.  We were there with our Performance tent and a Fuji Absolute 3.0 commuting bike to show/explain to passing students what to look for in a good bike for commuting and to highlight the benefits of riding a bike over driving a car.

Scott and Len from our Pittsburgh, PA store recently attended a Tour De Cure Kick off Event with a group of about 50 cyclists. 6 guest Speakers discussed various aspects of the Tour de Cure and the sport of cycling. But the highlight of the evening was our “spin off fundraiser challenge”, where guests “challenged” others to a “spin off” on 2 stationary bikes for a total of 5 minutes. Whoever traveled the furthest won the challenge, and the “loser” donated $25 to the Tour de Cure. Challenges were scheduled in between each guest speaker, and our team kept everyone motivated and entertained the crowd during the 5 minute battles, all in the name of a good cause!

Another form of dedication was on display in our Sorrento Valley, CA, which played host to many participants in the Stage Coach 400. A completely self-supported event (meaning riders are required to carry overnight gear and other items to safely and successfully complete the route), racers in the Stage Coach 400 ride a 400 mile mostly doubletrack route highlighting Southern California’s geographic and cultural diversity and climb nearly 31,000 feet in about 5 days. Check out the setups on these bikes:  

In keeping with our race theme, staff from our Speedway Tucson and Broadway Tucson, AZ stores provided roadside tech support at the Tour De Tucson Mountain race on a warm April day. There were over 900 event participants this year, and they helped raise approximately $4,500 to benefit the University of Arizona Alumni Association, University of Arizona Medical Center – South Campus Children’s Center Clinic, TMC Children’s Miracle Network, Pima Community College Foundation, Marana Community Food Bank and other Perimeter Bicycling charities.

In addition to supporting the Tour de Tucson, Lance Vett from our Chandler store, Rene Arriaga from our Broadway Tucson store and Leslie Dusz from our Speedway Tucson store also set up a booth at the Tucson Mountains Expo, where they showed off some of our bikes, handed out nutrition samples and talked bikes with Tucson-area cyclists.

Of course there were also our regularly scheduled Spin Doctor clinics at all of our stores, so here are a few pictures from a sampling of stores, starting with our Akron, OH store:

Plus our Charlottesville, VA store – who held their clinic outside:

And finally our Chandler, AZ store, which had a full-house for their clinic:

League of American Bicyclists Guest Post: National Bike Month

It’s National Bike to Work Week, so we’re turning our blog over to our friends from the the League of American Bicyclists, the driving force behind National Bike Month.  Read on below to find out more about what they’re doing to build a Bicycle Friendly America, and also find out what communities have been recognized as Bicycle Friendly Communities this year.

Whether you’re a daily bike commuter or just curious about the benefits of bicycling, May is your time to shine.

For the past 50 years, the League of American Bicyclists has hosted and organized National Bike Month to celebrate cycling and encourage new and longtime riders to get back in the saddle. For decades, we’ve designated and promoted Bike to Work Week — this week! — and Bike to Work Day, and the number of bicycle commuters has continued to rise.

How are you celebrating Bike Month this year? Check our website or contact your local advocacy organization to find an event in your area! And, no matter how you’re celebrating, don’t forget to sign up for the National Bike Challenge, a new friendly competition that kicked off May 1, aiming to unite 50,000 Americans to ride 10 million miles this summer!

But, while we’re all fired up about Bike Month, that’s just the beginning of the League’s efforts to make bicycling safe, accessible and enjoyable for all.  All year long, we’re working to protect your rights and make your ride better, wherever you’re going.

Just this morning, for instance, we announced the largest round of Bicycle Friendly Communities (BFC) in the program’s history. By evaluating and recognizing investment in bicycling promotion, education programs, infrastructure and pro-bicycling policies, the BFC program is revolutionizing the way communities evaluate their quality of life. With this impressive round, there are now 214 BFCs in 47 states — and the program works. While bike commuting rose 40 percent nationwide between 2000 and 2010, it jumped a staggering 77 percent in the largest BFCs.

The BFA program goes beyond cities and counties, too. The League also provides guidance and technical support through our Bicycle Friendly Business and Bicycle Friendly University programs, making workplaces and higher education more accommodating and accessible for cyclists. And we work with states, too: On May 22, we’ll release our latest Bicycle Friendly State Rankings, which showcases progress in areas like infrastructure, policies and education.

Beyond the Bicycle Friendly America program, we work with League members and organizations across the country to deliver our Smart Cycling education courses. From the basics of Traffic Skills 101 to targeted training, like Group Riding, the League curricula remains the gold standard for bicycle safety and skills for riders of all ages.

Based in Washington, D.C., the League is also your advocate on Capitol Hill. Each year, we convene the National Bike Summit, drawing hundreds of advocates, enthusiasts, retailers and policymakers to learn about federal transportation issues and lobby their members of Congress for funding and policies that meet the needs and rights of the growing number of bicyclists nationwide. This year we had a record crowd of more than 800 attendees. Mark your calendar now for the 2013 Summit, so you can tell your members of Congress that Bicycling Means Business.

And, of course, the League is committed to building the movement by connecting you to clubs and rides in your community, and sharing stories and innovations on our daily blog. Join the conversation by subscribing to our blog, becoming a fan on Facebook or following us on Twitter. We welcome your energy and ideas — with your help we’ll build a Bicycle Friendly America where every month is National Bike Month!

The League of American Bicyclists promotes bicycling for fun, fitness and transportation, and works through advocacy and education for a bicycle-friendly America. The League represents the interests of America’s 57 million bicyclists, including its 300,000 members and affiliates. For more information or to support the League, visit www.bikeleague.org.

Zach’s Training Diary: The Beginning

We know that for many of you, cycling is about the journey and not the destination. It’s the same story for Zach, who works here at our home office in North Carolina. His passion for cycling has changed his life for the better and he’s graciously agreed to share his story right here on our blog, as he trains throughout the season to get ready for the epic Alpine Loop Grand Fondo this fall.

As a 30 year old, 5’ 11” father and husband, online calculators tell me I’m supposed to be around 180 pounds. My “ideal cycling weight”, according to Bicycling Magazine, is 172 pounds.

In September of 2012, I plan to do one of the hardest one-day rides in the US, the Alpine Loop Grand Fondo, hosted by world class mountain bike racer Jeremiah Bishop. The ride is over 100 miles long and climbs 11,000 feet on both pavement and gravel roads. It will be the hardest ride I’ve done in my four years as a cyclist, and this is my story.

I rode bicycles when I was younger. My father, aside from being my hero, was also a dedicated triathlete and road cyclist. As a kid it was my dream to be able to keep up with him on the road and if all went according to plan, eventually be faster than he was. Fast-forward just about ten years. I had gone to college, graduated and was out in the real world, working at a desk job. Before I knew it, I had gone from my high school weight of around 185 pounds, to an astonishing, and scary, 276 pounds.

I was sitting in my office one day when I received a call from my Dad. He and my brother had decided to do a sprint triathlon, and wanted me to join in. “It’ll be like old times.” Dad said. “It’ll be me and my boys.” I figured why not? I signed up for the triathlon, and decided to start “training.” Part of my training was commuting on my clapped-out mountain bike that was rusty and grimy from years of abuse and neglect. So, I started riding a bike regularly for the first time in almost ten years. I’ll be honest, it sucked.

I felt like a fish out of water. I didn’t know what to wear. It was kind of scary riding next to cars. It was really hot in the middle of the North Carolina summer where the humidity is something you can reach out and grab. Most of all, it was just really, really, hard. Even though the commute was only four miles, it had long and steep hills with a backpack slammed full of work attire, lunch, and various electronics. It took weeks to get into a routine. I would forget lunch frequently, or forget a shirt, or belt, or my phone. You get the idea.

I was ready to quit this commuting business several times, but the promise of doing the triathlon with my dad and brother kept me going. After about a month of commuting and training, I jumped on the scale and realized that I had lost weight for the first time in years. While what I was doing was tough, it seemed to be getting a little easier, was giving me numbers driven results, and was actually fun. I began to take my triathlon training a bit more seriously (the cycling aspect, that is). I started talking to some friends about cycling, and started visiting local bike shops. Soon thereafter, I realized that if I wanted to get to work faster and easier, and if I wanted to be a bit more competitive during my triathlon, I was going to need a road bike with those bigger wheels and skinnier tires.

I jumped for a $300 road bike off craigslist (lovingly named ‘ole blue). It was too small for me, but I didn’t know that at the time. Throughout the next year or so I did the triathlon, rode in regular weekly group rides, and got involved with a local team who raised money and rode bicycles to fight Multiple Sclerosis. I was riding almost every day, whether to work or on a group ride, or just out by myself. It was fun, a LOT of fun, and I was feeling great. Oh yeah, and I was losing a ton of weight as a byproduct.

Cycling was changing my life. I was getting more fit, was in a great mood, was productive at work, and was actually starting to get dates with hot women (one of which I tricked into marrying me). I got so into cycling that when a sales position opened at one of the local bike shops, I made a career change from a stable 8-5 to an hourly wage plus commission retail sales job. I joined a local race club and started trying my hand at criteriums and road races – where I continue to fail miserably, but have too much fun to quit. I became great friends with people of all ages and backgrounds all through the common bond of cycling. I was riding and I was hooked – the lifestyle had consumed me.

After a few years in the local retail shops, my wife and I had twins. Family life and a retail work schedule don’t mix very well, so I applied for a position here at Performance Bicycle’s home office and here I am, telling my story. I’m 203 pounds now, which is still a hefty load to carry. While I’ve gotten stronger on the bike since I first started riding my old mountain bike, I still get dropped on the hills at the local weekly world championships out of Wilson Park. Seriously, I am so slow on hills!

I have a burning desire to become a better climber, get faster on my bike, and reach my “ideal” weight of 180 pounds. To do this I know I have to put a lot of work in. I have to eat right, not drink too much beer, ride bikes and work out as much as time allows. I’ve got a job that takes a lot of time during the week, plus I love spending as much time with my wife and kids as possible, so time is limited when it comes to training for a ride such as the Alpine Loop Grand Fondo. But, it’s going to be worth it.

I do this for myself and my need to ride, but I also do it for my family. I want to be as healthy as possible so I can live a long and full life with my wife, and be there for my daughters as they grow old. Anytime I head out for a local group ride, or a race, or even just a solo ride, my wife tells me as I’m walking out the door, or lining up for the start, “Go get ‘em darlin’!” That’s what I’m going to do, and I’m going to share my journey with you.

Rails to Trails Guest Post: National Bike Month

Throughout National Bike Month we are highlighting the efforts of some of our advocacy partners who are making a difference for cyclists throughout the US. Last week we turned our blog over to our friends from People for Bikes, and this week we’re letting the good folks at the Rails to Trails Conservancy lead the train. Read on below to find out what they’re doing to make cycling safer and more accessible, and how you can help.

I bet most of you have a good trail or bike path close by, right? Yeah, I do – the Capital Crescent Trail between Maryland and Washington, D.C. I ride it each day to work, and sometimes on the weekend to meet buddies in the city.

For those of us fortunate enough to have access to a trail, bike lanes or just some wide-open space, riding a bike to get around is a pretty simple, visceral pleasure. The wind in your face, the adrenaline pumping… you save time, save money and generally feel good about things. Simple.

But as basic as this joy seems to those of us who ride regularly, in many parts of America there are significant barriers to this simple activity. In a landscape often designed for cars to the exclusion of walking or biking, millions of Americans lack a safe and convenient place to ride at all, let alone a network of trails, bike lanes and paths that enable others to ride to work, to school, to visit friends or go shopping.

Riding the new Windsor/Ash bicycle boulevard in Columbia, Mo.

That’s what drives us at Rails to Trails Conservancy. We have an ambitious target—referred to here in our office as the Big Hairy Audacious Goal—to put 90 percent of Americans within three miles of a trail system by 2020.

We are working toward that goal by helping communities develop rail-trail projects, by supporting trail-based business and residential development, by working hard on Capitol Hill and with state and local governments for policies and funding that recognize the importance of biking to our transportation system, and by building a movement of people who love their trails and want to spread that love!

Opening day of the Windsor/Ash bicycle boulevard in Columbia, Mo.

National Bike Month this year is a particularly significant one for us, as it marks the release of a report on active transportation we have been eagerly anticipating. Launched by Congress in 2005—and with management support from RTC—the Nonmotorized Transportation Pilot Program (NTPP) dedicated $25 million to each of four communities to invest in biking and walking infrastructure. The idea was to see what this kind of unprecedented, targeted investment could do to change and grow a culture of biking and walking in these communities.

Essentially, it was an experiment into whether Americans were interested in non-motorized transportation – whether, to borrow loosely from a famous baseball movie about a guy in a cornfield, “If we build it, will they come?”

The results came in last week, and just three years into the pilot the change in transportation behavior tells a truly compelling story.

Across the four communities, counts revealed a 49 percent increase in biking. Compared to a national increase of 15 percent from 2001 to 2009, that spike is astounding. In just three years, the pilot communities achieved triple the expansion in biking activity the rest of America took eight years to realize.

Building the Cal Park-Hill Tunnel path to San Francisco in Marin County, Calif.

Although the pilot program did involve education and safety programs, a huge part of this increase was directly tied to infrastructure – physically providing safe, convenient and direct pathways that actually take people where they need to go.

In Columbia, Mo., the new Windsor/Ash bicycle boulevard completed in 2010 resulted in a 124 percent increase in bicycle traffic. In Marin County, Calif., the new Cal Park-Hill Tunnel path to San Francisco—constructed through a hillside and alongside active rail tracks—resulted in a 400 percent increase in weekday bicyclists. Nearby, the new Alameda Del Prado bicycle lanes increased weekday bicycle traffic by 366 percent and weekend bicycle traffic by 540 percent.

No question, if we build it, they will come. Big time.

Heading into the Cal Park-Hill Tunnel path in Marin County, Calif.

So what does this mean for you? Well, right now the U.S. Congress is debating whether to dedicate any transportation funding to biking and walking infrastructure, as part of a new federal transportation bill. Many of our Congressional representatives believe that money spent on enabling biking and walking is “frivolous,” and a waste of taxpayer dollars that should be spent exclusively on roads.

Rails to Trails Conservancy is doing everything we can to make sure our transportation system provides a better balance and gives people the healthier, cheaper, cleaner and greener option to bike and walk. If you have a moment, tell your representative that a car-only landscape isn’t the way you want to roll, and that being able to bike is an important part of your transportation future.

It’s a critical time – every voice and every vote counts.

Happy National Bike Month, everyone!

2012 Tour Devinci, Build a Bike Giveaway

Have you ever wanted to see how a bike is born, in person? Enter our 2012 Tour Devinci, Build a Bike Giveaway & you could be on your way to Quebec this summer to do just that – thanks to our friends at Devinci Cycles. This is an extraordinary opportunity to find out first-hand how Devinci designs and handcrafts their high-quality road and mountain bikes, from the ground up, in their high-tech factory in Chicoutimi, Quebec. Check out their factory tour video for a sneak-peek of what you might see if you win our giveaway:

Devinci has been building bikes since 1987, and they’ve forged their reputation by designing and creating bikes that deliver extraordinary performance. Devinci stands for excellence, vision and an unwavering devotion to the art of the bicycle and the thrill of the ride. Devinci road bikes and mountain bikes are products of constant innovation. They’re rigorously tested beyond industry standards, and actually warranted for the life of the original owner.

So what do you get if you win our 2012 Tour Devinci, Build a Bike Giveaway? The winner will fly to Quebec (from the US) to meet the Devinci staff and see how Devinci bikes are designed, tested, machined, welded and assembled – and participate in every step of that process. You’ll even get the chance to test out Devinci‘s quality by riding local trails, scenic road loops, or both, with Devinci staff. Check out the trip itinerary here for all of the details of this action-packed 3 day trip in August.

Plus you’ll get a new Devinci bike as a souvenir: your choice of either a 2012 Devinci Leo SL K Road Bike or a 2012 Devinci Atlas RC 29er Mountain Bike. Check out this quick video from Adam Carr of the Ekoi.com-Gaspesien pro cycling team talking about his personal Leo racing bike to learn more about the design of the Leo (the team uses different components than our 2012 Devinci Leo SL K Road Bike, but the frame is the same):

And here’s a product overview video of the 2012 Devinci Atlas RC 29er Mountain Bike, with details on this maneuverable and great-handling big-wheel XC sled:

Be sure to read the contest rules for more details about the 2012 Tour Devinci, Build a Bike Giveaway and enter now! Contest entry dates are 4/30/12 – 5/28/12 and only one entry per person.

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