Real Advice: Weight Loss

Time for another installment of our Real Advice series – hard-earned practical knowledge from real riders here at our home office. This week we delve into the topic of weight loss for cyclists.

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It’s no secret that losing some weight is one of the best ways to make yourself faster, a better climber, and just feel a lot better all around. Cycling is great exercise, but often riders—both beginners and more experienced riders—can fall into the same traps that prevent them from losing weight, and sometimes even gain it while riding.

There’s a million weight loss guides out there, and many are more authoritative than anything we could offer up. But at the end of the day we’re just like you. We have families, full time jobs, and sometimes it’s hard to think about eating right. So here are some basic, easy tricks and tips that we’ve used over the years to get down to race weight, or shake off the effects of a long winter. There aren’t any magic bullets or miracle diets here. Losing weight takes time, and progress may be slow at first. Everyone is different though, and what works for one may not work for another. If you have something that’s worked for you, feel free to make liberal use of the comments section below and join the conversation.

1. RIDE MORE: Losing weight can be a simple equation of calories in vs. calories out. If you want to lose weight, you need to expend more calories, which means more saddle time. That can be tricky though, as most of us feel squeezed to get in enough riding as it is. Here are some tricks we use to get more riding in:

  • Try commuting to work at least a few days a week
  • Ride early before work or school, when the day is still your own, and you probably don’t have the work and family responsibilities you do in the evening
  • Extending your ride by just 15 minutes can burn up to 75 more calories (hey, every little bit helps)
  • Instead of trying to squeeze in one long ride, try going for two shorter rides that may accommodate your free time better
  • If you are short on time, ride harder (within your ability level). A 30 minute spin is not the time to take it easy and soft pedal. Raising the intensity of shorter rides can help you both build stamina and burn more calories.

2. EVERYTHING IN MODERATION: Most people have a mentality that working out entitles them to pretty much eat whatever they want afterwards. While the occasional slice of pie ain’t gonna make or break you, the truth of the matter is that unless you’re spending all day in the saddle or riding hard at a racing pace, that last ride probably didn’t burn more than a few hundred calories. While fueling and recovery are important, most riders way overestimate how many calories they actually need to eat.

  • Before your ride, eat only a moderate snack like some bread with peanut butter or an energy gel.
  • If your ride will be less than 90 minutes, you may not need a mid-ride snack. Save the gels and energy bars for longer, harder rides.
  • After your ride, eat a small meal with a good blend of protein and carbs (see our guide here).

3. TRACK CALORIES OUT:  A heart rate monitor may seem unnecessary for most riders, but it’s the most accurate way to track how many calories you have burned in a ride. Wearing one while you ride can help guide how many calories you should eat over the course of a day.

A heart rate monitor can be linked to many cycling computers, or can be used as a stand-alone unit, like this one from Polar.

4. COUNT CALORIES IN: There is all kinds of conflicting info out there about the accuracy of calorie measurement, but for most people counting calories works.

  • Read food labels, and pick foods that have a lower amount of calories PER SERVING.
  • Avoid the triple threat of fat, salt, and sugar. Fat, salt and sugar are bad for losing weight, so choose foods that have less salt, sugar and fat per serving
  • Go for fiber. Foods that are high in fiber and low in sugar have plenty of health benefits, and can help you feel fuller for longer. Avoid granola bars that have added fiber and are loaded with sugar. Instead choose beans, whole grains, and fresh fruit and vegetables.
  • Lay off the soda. Soda is loaded with empty calories, sugar and other stuff that isn’t exactly conducive to weight loss.

5. STEP ON THE SCALE: Studies show that stepping on the scale regularly can help keep you accountable. Keep a scale at home, and weigh yourself every day in the morning, and again in the evening. Don’t get discouraged by what you see though. Weight can vary depending on how much salt you ate, how much water you drank, etc… It’s the average downward trend we’re looking for. We’re playing the long game here.

6. KEEP A JOURNAL: Keeping track of weight, calories in, calories out, and distance/time ridden can help you stay accountable to yourself, and track your progress. If you are meeting your goals, it can help give you that positive motivation to see it written down. If you are not, then you can look at the numbers and see where you might have room for some fine tuning.

7. EAT BREAKFAST: In today’s fast paced world most of us either skip breakfast, or just grab something from the Golden Arches on the go. However, choosing a healthy, filling breakfast like a homemade fruit and yogurt smoothie, fresh fruit and toast, or granola cereal can help fuel you throughout the day, and delay those feelings of being hungry.

Oatmeal is a great way to start the morning. Filling, healthy, and full of energy. Find this recipe in the Feed Zone Cookbook from Skratch Labs.

Oatmeal is a great way to start the morning. Filling, healthy, and full of energy. Find this recipe in the Feed Zone Cookbook from Skratch Labs.

8. PLAN YOUR MEALS: Planning out your meals may be one of the most important things to help you lose weight. Below are some tips our employees use to make sure they can eat healthy, even when they’re in a rush.

  • Don’t eat out as much. Eating out means eating meals full of hidden calories and questionable ingredients. Eating out is ok occasionally, but when possible eat food you’ve prepared yourself. Plus, it’s expensive, and you need that money to buy new, smaller bike clothes.
  • More lean protein and veggies, less cheese and red meat.
  • Just because it’s a salad doesn’t mean it’s healthy. Lay off the bottled dressings and shredded cheeses. Try making your own dressing with olive oil and vinegar, and using avocado or cottage cheese instead of shredded cheese.
  • Bring your lunch. This gives you the power to know exactly what you’re eating and how many calories are in it. If you’re pressed for time in the mornings, make it the night before.
  • The same goes for breakfast. Try making or preparing your breakfast the night before, and then putting it in the fridge.
  • When you make dinner, make big batches. You can then refrigerate or freeze them to reuse on nights when you may feel rushed or don’t have time to make a fresh dinner.
  • Lastly, eat real food whenever possible. This means avoiding pre-packaged, processed foods and eating more veggies, fruits, lean meats, beans and whole grains. While convenient and sometimes low in calories, processed foods are stuffed full of sodium, saturated fat and other stuff that can prevent you losing weight, and probably won’t make you feel your best. The Feed Zone Cookbook by Biju Thomas & Allen Lim has some great recipes for cyclists.

The Feed Zone is an excellent cook book for cyclists. The recipes are tailored to give you energy to ride, and feel your best.

We’ll be the first to say that we’re not experts on the topic, so before you follow any of our recommendations, it’s best to consult with a doctor, trainer, or dietician who can help you figure out a plan that’s right for you. You shouldn’t in any way, shape, or form consider this to be an end all be all prescription for shedding some pounds.

Interbike Wrap-Up

A few weeks ago we covered our big trends and favorite new gear from Eurobike, the world’s biggest cycling trade show, but this week we’re turning our focus to Interbike, the huge North American cycling trade show that takes place every year in the bright lights and high heat of Las Vegas, Nevada. Despite the distractions of Sin City, we were focused on bikes and cycling gear – read on below for a few highlights from our week in the desert.

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Las Vegas Strip by night

1. One of the coolest parts of Interbike is getting to test-ride new bikes on the dusty trails at Bootleg Canyon, so this year we took the opportunity to take a few 27.5″ trail bikes out for a spin. Our verdict? This in-between wheel size can definitely be a lot of fun – being a bit larger means that they roll over obstacles easier than a 26″ bike, while at the same time being more nimble and maneuverable than a 29″ bike. 2 of our test-ride favorites came from our friends at GT and Breezer – these guys know mountain bikes, and it shows. GT has 2 brand new 27.5″ platforms for 2014, the 130mm Sensor and the 150mm Force, both of which feature their Angle Optimized Suspension design. Breezer is back in the full-suspension mountain bike game in a big way with their brand new Repack model, which is built around an innovative MLink suspension design that pivots around a link midway down the chainstay.

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We actually got the chance to talk to Joe Breeze about the Repack later in the week and found out more about the history of the iconic Repack name and about how the 160mm of travel plus the MLink suspension technology is designed to create an all-mountain riding machine, with snappy handling and stability on the downhills:

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2. Also at OutDoor Demo, our eyes were drawn to a gorgeous fleet of custom frames outfitted with top end Easton Cycling bars, stems, seatposts and their brand new EC90 Aero 55 wheels. It turns out that Easton is giving away these hand built road bike beauties (from Caletti Cycles, Calfee Design, Black Cat, Hunter and Rock Lobster) in their Dream Bike Charity Raffle. Each of the next 5 months Easton is raffling off one of these custom bikes to support the charity of the frame-builder’s choice – you can purchase multiple $5 raffle tickets to increase your chances of winning and 100% of the proceeds from each raffle will go to the charity (although no purchase is necessary to enter). We were lucky enough to test ride the Calfee and Rock Lobster bikes, and we can say that you won’t be disappointed if you win either one!

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This month you still have a chance to win a Calfee Manta (although Calfee will build any size/model frame the winner prefers) –  a wild “race platform” road bike that leverages a patented, active suspension system at the rear wheel. The design enhances traction, power transmission and comfort to increase rider performance – plus the bike just looks amazing. All proceeds from this raffle go to Cyclists for Cultural Exchange – you can enter on the Easton Cycling Facebook page by September 30 and the winner will be selected randomly on October 1, 2013. Dain from Easton told us more about the Dream Bike Charity Raffle at OutDoor Demo:

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3. Fat bikes were also a big presence at Interbike this year, no pun intended (OK, maybe a little one). These big-wheeled bikes were cropping up all over the show floor, along with the accessories to go with them. Of note was the 21 pound all carbon fat bike from Borealis, along with tubeless rim systems from HED (in carbon) and Stan’s NoTubes – with this kind of technology, you might start seeing fat bikes regularly on your local trails soon.

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4. It’s hard to sum up the rest of Interbike this year – there was development on the technical front with hydraulic disc brake systems for road bikes becoming a common sight, from both Shimano and SRAM, but much of the other developments were tweaks and improvements to existing gear. New all-mountain style helmets were on display from Bern, Bell and Smith Optics (they of the interesting Forefront model). More high-viz colors cropped up throughout the show style-wise, but camo and earth-tone colors were common as well. Most of the wheel manufacturers had refined hubs or rims, with new gear from Easton, Reynolds and Zipp on display, among others. These weren’t dramatic changes, but they were evolutionary changes that promise improved performance and durability. All in all it was an Interbike without any real big surprises (once you got beyond road hydraulic brakes and 11 speeds as original equipment, but most of you have seen those by now) – but maybe that’s a good thing.

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As always, you can find all of our photos from Interbike in a gallery on our Facebook page.

Wordless Wednesday

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Real Advice: Bicycle Lights

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It’s getting to be about that time of year again, and the days are getting shorter. Believe us, we’re none too happy about it either. But just because daylight is in limited supply doesn’t mean you can’t get some riding in while the gettin’ is good. All you really need is some lights to help you see a little better and be more visible to cars and traffic. With the right lights, riding at night can add an exhilarating new dimension to familiar trails, help you extend your riding hours during the dark months, or make you feel safer on the roads.

Here’s some of their Real Advice when it comes to bike lights, courtesy of a daily commuter, a mountain biker with a fondness for night riding, and couple of roadies.

To learn more about the different types of lights, click here.

The Commuter:

One of our coworkers commutes about 12 miles on dark, unlit rural roads. There aren’t any street lamps along her route, so in addition to hi-viz, reflective clothing, she uses as many lights as possible to light her way and make herself visible.

  • Blackburn Flea 2.0 USB taillight: this rear light is very compact, lightweight, and incredibly bright with multiple flash modes. Plus, I can recharge them at my computer at work.

The Blackburn Flea 2.0 USB packs a big brightness to weight punch

  • Blackburn Mars 3 taillight: this is a very bright tail light. It has a different flash pattern than my Flea 2.0 taillight, which helps grab more motorists attention

The Mars 3 taillight is weatherproof, bright, and easy to install

  • CygoLite HotShot 2 Watt USB taillight: I have this light attached to the rear of my helmet, and I use it on its steady pattern instead of flash. The steady, high up light helps cars see me, even if their view may be partially obscured by the traffic in front of them. Like the Flea, this can be recharged on my computer at work.

The CygoLight HotShot 2 is ideal for all types of commuting

  • Blackburn Flea 2.0 USB headlight: I mount this lightweight, compact light on my left fork arm. It’s incredibly bright and has a very distinctive flash mode. Plus, I can recharge them at my computer at work.

The Blackburn Flea 2.0 can be recharged via USB and is incredibly bright

  • Axiom Flare 5 LED headlight: I mount this commuter headlight on my handlebars. It’s pretty bright, and has a great flash mode that augments the Flea 2.0. Plus, in a pinch it’s about bright enough to light my way if my headlamp battery dies.

The Axiom 5 is ideal for urban commuters, or as a secondary light on more rural roads

  • NiteRider Pro 1800 Race LED headlight: Without streetlights, you’d be surprised how dark the night can get. I use this light to illuminate the road in front of me. It has the added advantage of being as bright, if not brighter than, a car’s headlights—so it makes you pretty much unmistakable on the road. It has multiple settings, so you don’t burn through the battery or blind any motorists.

The NiteRider Pro 1800 Race puts out 1800 lumens, has multiple modes, and is ideal for rural commuting or mountain biking

The Mountain Biker:

Mountain biking is pretty big here near our offices, and hitting the trails at night is a favorite fall and winter past time. We asked one of the trail regulars at our offices what lights he uses on the technical, twisting trails in North Carolina to avoid accidents and safely navigate the trails.

  • Light and Motion Seca 750 Sport LED headlight: this light has a really nice, broad, diffuse beam pattern that gives some ambient light to the trail so you can see where you’re going. I mount this one on my handlebars so I can see where the bike is pointed.

The Seca 750 is ideal for night time mountain biking or commuting

  • NiteRider Pro 1800 headlight: This bad boy gets mounted on my helmet so I can see exactly where I’m looking. The tight, focused beam makes this light more like a spotlight that lets me look down the turns in the trails even if my bike isn’t pointed that way.

The NiteRider Pro 1800 Race makes an ideal spotlight when hitting the trails at night

The Roadies:

When heading out for some weekend road riding, it’s usually a good idea to bring a set of safety lights, even if you think you’ll be back before dark. They’re small, lightweight, and take just a few seconds to install. If they’re really heading out as it’s getting dark, they’ll usually opt for a setup similar to Mrs. Commuter.

Mr. Campagnolo:

  • Blackburn Click front and rear light: I really like these lights from Blackburn. They’re still small, but they are a little bulkier than most safety lights. But they make up for it by being much brighter than most. Plus, I like the attachment for the rear light since it faces directly backwards on the seatpost and doesn’t rub against my leg while pedaling.

The Blackburn Click fits easily a jersey pocket

Mr. SRAM:

The Axiom Zap fits easily into a pocket and is easy to install

Real Advice: Dressing For The Fall

Today we continue with our Real Advice series – hard-earned practical knowledge from real riders here at our home office. This week we hear from a team member who has a special fondness for some late season riding.

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My favorite days to ride are October or November days when I wake up, look outside and see grey skies. Of course I love getting in some good riding in warm, sunny weather, but there’s something about the solitude of those overcast days that really makes me remember why I love this sport. Maybe it’s the loneliness of the road, maybe I ride better in lower temperatures, maybe I just really look forward to that post-ride pumpkin-flavored carbohydrate recovery beverage that’s only available at this particular time of year. Who knows. What is for certain though is that without dressing right for the weather, those rides would not be nearly so enjoyable.

When it comes to dressing for the fall, there are two things to keep in mind: layers and versatility. Dressing in layers not only helps keep you warmer by trapping air between the layers, but it also lets you more effectively manage exactly how hot you get by allowing you to remove layers as the day warms up. It also helps if your clothing options are versatile, and able to be combined in different ways to adapt to the conditions. It’s not unusual for me to start off a fall ride at 6AM dressed in several layers of clothes, only to return home at 2 in the afternoon in shorts and jersey with my pockets stuffed with warmers and jackets.

So, if you’re ready to get on the fall riding gravy train (with carbon fiber wheels, of course), then follow this handy dandy guide to dressing for the fall.

DRESSING FOR THE FALL

1.    FALL ESSENTIALS:

  • Shorts and Jersey: I continue to ride in my usual bib shorts and short sleeve jerseys well into the fall. When combined with the below listed items, this is the foundation of a versatile riding kit that can adapt to almost any weather condition.
Shorts and jersey are a good foundation for the fall

Shorts and jersey are a good foundation for the fall

  • Base Layer: invest in a long and a short sleeve or sleeveless base layer. Base layers are worn under the jersey (and under bib straps, if you wear bib shorts) and add an extra light layer that can help keep you warm, while moving sweat away from your skin—essential for hot or cold weather. I personally prefer merino wool base layers for fall riding, since they keep you warm, but won’t make you overheat if the day ends up warmer than you think.

A base layer will help keep you warm and wick away sweat

  • Arm and Knee/Leg warmers: warmers are usually a better option this time of year than long sleeve jerseys or tights. Good ones are usually just as effective as tights or a long jersey, but they have the added advantage of being removable as the day warms up—plus they roll up small enough to be stuffed into a jersey pocket for storage
Arm, leg or knee warmers can keep you warm and are easily removed if you get too hot

Arm, leg or knee warmers can keep you warm and are easily removed if you get too hot

  • Vest: a good wind vest is essential for this time of year. It helps keep your core warm, and most of them will block the wind pretty well. If you’re really pushing it hard, you can always unzip a bit to get more air moving. Like warmers, these have the advantage of being removable and low bulk, so they can be easily stored in a pocket if necessary.

A wind vest will help keep your core warm

  • Long Finger Gloves: For most riders, long finger gloves are essential. Cold fingers become stiff and lethargic, which is bad news since as cyclists we depend on our fingers to operate the brakes and shift mechanisms, so keeping them warm is essential. Don’t go for heavy insulated gloves or ones with WindStopper material though, as these are usually too warm for this time of year, and you’ll just end up with sweat-soaked gloves that may chill your fingers even more.

Full finger gloves help keep your hands warm in cool temperatures

  • Headband: On very cold mornings I like to start off wearing a headband. The headband keeps your ears and forehead warm, while still allowing heat to escape through the top of your head. As an added benefit, when it’s time to remove it, the headband is so small you almost won’t notice it in your pocket.

A headband helps keep your ears and forehead warm on cold mornings

  • Toe Warmers: I reserve these for only the coldest mornings. As the name implies, these are little half booties that go over the ends of your shoes to help add insulation to your toes. Again, once these are no longer needed, they can removed and stowed in a pocket. If you’re like me and have toes that, once cold, will never warm up no matter what, you may want to try oversocks, which are just like normal regular socks, but tougher, that you wear over your shoes to help them hold in some extra warmth. 

Toe warmers add some extra warmth to your feet on the coldest fall days

2. PAY ATTENTION TO THE WEATHER: Remember that cloudy days will be colder than sunny ones, and windy days will be colder than calm ones. It’s also a good idea to check the entire forecast for the day—or at least the next few hours. Dress appropriately for the weather, but if you’re unsure what to for given conditions, then check out this cool app from Bicycling Magazine.

3. PAY ATTENTION TO YOUR BODY: After I get dressed for a ride, I like to go stand in my driveway in an area exposed to the wind for a minute or two and see how I feel. On a cold morning you should start off feeling slightly chilled, but not cold. If you’re shivering, then you don’t have enough clothes on, so go back inside and add a layer. If you feel nice and toasty warm, that’s pretty much a guarantee you’ll be roasting within the next 20 minutes, so you could probably stand to drop a layer or two. During your ride it can sometimes be tough to know when it’s time to pull over and take off a layer or two. Surprisingly, your ears will generally be the best indicator of how hot you’re getting. If your ears start to feel warm or hot, then it’s time to either unzip or shed a layer.

4. BRIGHTEN IT UP: My favorite kit color is black, and I make no apologies for it. During the fall though, I realize that just isn’t practical or safe. The days are shorter, and drivers are more distracted with leaves and stuff, so it’s more important than ever to stand out while on the road. I personally opt for a fluoro yellow wind vest, and leg and arm warmers with plenty of reflective accents on them. You don’t necessarily have to go fluoro, but choosing a bright color like red, blue or yellow will help you be more visible to passing cars.

5. ROLL WELL STOCKED: Speaking of shorter days, you need to roll prepared when you ride in the fall—especially if you’re going solo. I always stuff a set of safety lights in my jersey pocket, even if I plan on being back before dark. A good set, like the Blackburn Flea 2.0 combo are lightweight and very bright. Also remember that there are fewer cyclists on the road, so there are fewer people who can help you if you are having mechanical problems. Make sure you have a flat repair kit and multi-tool, and you know how to use them. 

Wordless Wednesday

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2014 Scattante CFX Black Cyclocross Bikes

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When we first introduced the Scattante CFX Black cyclocross bike in 2012, we broke some new ground. It wasn’t our first foray into the world of ‘cross, but the CFX took things to a whole new level. We designed the bike from the ground up to be ready to take you to the podium with a full carbon fiber frameset, SRAM Force 10-speed group and, most importantly, the addition of recently-legalized disc brakes.

Well, we’re never really content to rest on our laurels, so after the success of the 2013 CFX Black, we did it again.

The all-new 2014 Scattante CFX Black cyclocross bike is now available, and for 2014 it comes in two flavors: one with SRAM Red 22 Hydro with hydraulic disc brakes and 11-speed drivetrain, the other comes with SRAM Force 22 with mechanical disc brakes, and also features 11-speed shifting. We’re immensely proud of both of these bikes, and confident that they’ll take your CX season to a new level. You can get to know both of these beauties a little better below.

The Scattante CFX Black. It's business time.

The Scattante CFX Black. It’s business time.

The Scattante CFX Black SRAM Red 22 Hydro

The Scattante CFX Black SRAM Red 22 Hydro is among the best bikes we’ve ever built. It’s loaded with high-end, high-performance features that have only one goal: to put you on the podium. This is a no-nonsense race bike that begs to be ridden hard. And thanks to the addition of a SRAM Hydro braking system, you can stop hard, too. The Hydro levers make look a little funny, but don’t be fooled, there’s some serious technology under those hoods.

Features:

  • ScDT carbon tech delivers a frame and fork with the precision and handling ability required for cyclocross competition
  • Hydraulic SRAM Red disc brakes increase stopping power, especially in adverse weather conditions
  • SRAM 22 Hydraulic drivetrain has 11-speeds and a cross specific 46/36 crank configuration
  • Stan’s ZTR Alpha 340 wheels are tubeless compatible to run lower pressure for increased traction in muck and mud
  • FSA Energy components bring serious durability and versatility to the cross course
2013 Scattante CFX Black with SRAM Red 22 Hydro

2013 Scattante CFX Black with SRAM Red 22 Hydro

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Hydraulic SRAM Red 22 shifters

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Hydraulic SRAM Red disc brakes

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Cross specific 46/36 SRAM Red 22 crankset

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ScDT carbon frame and fork

The Scattante CFX Black SRAM Force 22

The Scattante CFX Black SRAM Force 22 is a bike that refuses to play second fiddle. Sure, it’s a little more modestly priced, but that doesn’t mean you get more modest performance. It features the same ScDT carbon technology, wheels and build kit as its big brother. But instead of a hydraulic braking system, instead you get Force 22 with mechanical disc brakes. The redesigned shifters, all-new crank design, and True 22 shifting technology make this bike a force to be reckoned with.

  • ScDT carbon tech delivers a frame and fork with the precision and handling ability required for cyclocross competition
  • Avid BB7 Disc brakes increase stopping power, especially in adverse weather conditions
  • SRAM Force 22 drivetrain has 11-speeds and a cross specific 46/36 crank configuration
  • Stan’s ZTR Alpha 340 wheels are tubeless compatible to run lower pressure for increased traction in muck and mud
  • FSA Energy components bring serious durability and versatility to the cross course
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2013 Scattante CFX Black with SRAM Force 22

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11-speed SRAM Force 22 drivetrain

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Cross specific 46/36 crank configuration

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Avid BB7 Disc brakes

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ScDT carbon frame and fork

Eurobike Wrap-Up

We’ve finally recovered from the jetlag after Eurobike, the cycling industry’s biggest international trade show. A 3 day festival of anything and everything bike-related, Eurobike takes place every year near the idyllic shores of Lake Constance in the southwest corner of Germany. While the show is really too big to sum up in just a few paragraphs, we’ll hit a few highlights and trends below – before we head out to the biggest US cycling show, Interbike in Las Vegas.

The scenery around Eurobike is slightly different than at Interbike in Las Vegas.

The scenery around Eurobike is slightly different than at Interbike in Las Vegas.

1. 27.5″ (or 650B) wheels for mountain bikes are here to stay. This in-between wheel size (although it is closer in size to 26″ wheels than 29″ wheels) was on full display at Eurobike, with every major manufacturer offering a trail bike in this ‘tweener format. Mostly these bikes are being pitched as “all-mountain” or “enduro” bikes – but in reality that’s what most of us ride every day! We ride up, down and over whatever the trail throws at us, and want a bike that makes any trail more fun, so 27.5″ bikes should be a great fit. The continued rise of 27.5″ bikes also mean that more tires, wheels and suspension are also becoming available for upgrades later on. We’re especially excited about the new GT Force and Sensor bikes, and Joe Breeze’s very first full-suspension bike, the Breezer Repack.

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2. Hydraulic disc brakes for road/cyclocross bikes were also highly evident throughout the show. While we know that not everyone is going to be interested, many manufacturers have incorporated at least one road bike with hydraulic stoppers into their lineup, and definitely on a cyclocross bike if they have one. Both SRAM and Shimano offer hydraulic options on their newest high-end road components, and Campagnolo has partnered with Formula to offer a system. With the promise of increased braking power and consistency plus more freedom for the design of road bike wheels, it will be interesting to see how this trend develops over time.

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3. E-bikes, or electronic-pedal assist bikes, also had a huge presence in the halls of Eurobike. From city bikes to road bikes to full-suspension mountain bikes, manufacturers have jammed electric motors into just about any type of bike you can imagine. While e-bikes have not made inroads in the US so far, in Europe they already have a huge presence, even with costs of over $4,000 per bike (e-bikes account for 10% of all bike sales in Germany). We actually test-rode quite a few models of e-bikes at the show, including one rated at an assist level of up to 45km/h (or almost 30mph), and they are fun to ride, even if it does feel like you are cheating a bit.

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4. On the fashion front, Eurobike was awash in bright and highly visible colors, from safety orange, to brilliant blues, to fluorescents yellows and greens – although we noticed some camo patterns making a comeback as well. There were still plenty of traditional colors being used, but in our books these bright colors are good news – we’re in favor of anything that makes us more visible while we’re riding our bikes!

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5. Finally, Eurobike was exciting simply for it’s proliferation of creative and, sometimes, wacky ideas for bikes and gear. The energy and enthusiasm for anything bike-related was great to see – the world of people who love bikes and see great opportunities in this market is vast. Not all of these ideas might make it, but we love seeing what people dream up for the future of cycling.

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You can find all of our photos from Eurobike in a gallery on our Facebook page.

Real Advice: How to Lock Your Bike

Today we continue with our Real Advice series – hard-earned practical knowledge from real riders here at our home office. This week we hear again from Brian, a member of our content team, with some advice on how to lock up your bike. Brian lived in Chicago for about 10 years, and had more than a few run-ins with bike thieves.

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In the years I lived in Chicago, I had the following bikes— listed in no particular order—stolen: a black GT Pulse track bike, a beautiful emerald green Ciocc Enemy track bike, and a chromed-out Bianchi Pista track bike. I won’t even go into how many seat posts, saddles, and wheels I’ve replaced. Some may have said I got what I deserved for riding those bikes in a big city with a notorious bike theft problem. But after the tears dried, I came to realize that I was actually being taught the very valuable (and expensive) lesson that there is a right way and many, many, many wrong ways to do everything. Eventually, I got the hang of it, and haven’t had a bike stolen since.

So let me spare you some heartache by passing on a few tips you can learn at my expense. This is mostly advice for those of you in urban/suburban areas, college campuses and anywhere else that bike theft is a real issue.

1. Nail it down: So you’ve got your lock, but do you know how to use it? Here, I’ll lay out my Program of Bike Locking Excellence for you to follow:

  • Buy a strong u-lock, as well as both a thick and a thin lock cable (usually a 4-6 ft. cable is good). The basic idea is to lock anything that can be easily removed, such as the wheels, saddle and frame.

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  • First, route the thinner cable through the rails of your saddle by passing one end of the cable through one of the eyelets and cinching it down around the rails, leaving plenty of cable and an eyelet hanging down.

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  • Next, run your thicker lock cable through the rear wheel, and again pass one end of the cable through the eyelet, so the cable cinches around the wheel rim and the seat tube.

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  • Now, pass the thicker cable through the eyelet of the thinner cable.

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  • Position the u-lock shackle so as to lock the front wheel to the frame, and pass the shackle through the cable eyelet.

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  • Pass the u-lock shackle around the object you are locking to, replace the cross bar, and turn the key.

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  • When all this is done, double check that everything is actually secure.

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2. If you live in NYC or San Francisco: Disregard all of the above advice and buy the biggest, beefiest chain lock you can find on Performancebike.com.

3. Make it solid: Knowing how to lock your bike is only half the battle. To make sure your bike is still there when you get back, you’ll want to find the most solid, immovable thing you can (city bike racks, street lamps, parking meters) and lock your bike to it as securely as possible. To do this right, you have to think like a thief, which means you have to evaluate every potential locking location for ways it can be defeated. To wit, when my Ciocc was stolen, it was locked to a street sign pole outside of a bar. At the end of the night, my friends and I found the actual street sign on the ground and my bike nowhere in sight. The thief had somehow gotten up the pole, unbolted the sign, and then slid my bike—lock and all—up and over. That was a long walk home…

4. There are no quick errands: This seems obvious, but too many people just lean their bike up against a wall while they “quickly run into the coffee shop”. No matter how quick the errand, no matter how visible you think your bike is, or how many people are around, lock it up. It might seem like a hassle, but it’s worth taking the extra 20 seconds to properly lock up your bike. Because it takes even less time than that for someone to just hop on it and pedal away.

5. Safety in numbers: When possible, park your bike in an area where there are lots of other bikes. This won’t necessarily deter a thief in and of itself, but it waters down the chances of a thief targeting your bike. If possible, also try to find a bike that looks more desirable than yours and lock up next to that one. It may seem callous, but remember, you don’t have to be faster than the bear—you just have to be faster than the other guy.

6. Write it down: Let’s be honest here: there is no lock on earth that’s going to stop a very determined or experienced thief. If at all possible, bring your bike inside—especially overnight. Write down your bike’s serial number (usually found on the underside of the bottom bracket shell), and keep a detailed list and photos of your bike and components (take a new photo when you upgrade any parts). Most renters and home owner’s insurance policies will cover bike theft, so it’s a good idea to have proof of what kind of components were on your bike if you need to make a claim. Most lock companies like Kryptonite and OnGuard also offer a reimbursement program to help you buy a new bike if yours was stolen while using their product; inside your lock packaging will be instructions on how to sign up for this protection.

Wordless Wednesday

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