“What do bikes mean to you?” from Rails to Trails Conservancy

rails_to_trails-logo-headerBy Katie Harris, Communications Coordinator, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy

Imagine a country where you can safely get everywhere you need to go on bike or foot. The infrastructure suits your needs, your kids can ride along with you without concern, and a trip to the grocery store on two wheels is a no-brainer. It’s a nation of connected networks, with trail systems as the norm—not the exception.

At Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC), that’s the world we’re working toward, and, clearly, bikes are an integral element to that envisioned future. Let us show you how.

Bikes allow us to…

Atlanta BeltLine Eastside Trail - Photo by Jim Brown

Atlanta BeltLine Eastside Trail – Photo by Jim Brown

Explore

With more than 22,000 miles of multi-use trails in the United States, there is a lot of exploring to be done! Bikes allow us to see new areas but also allow us to discover our own backyards from a different perspective. Traveling by bike, whether it’s a day trip on your favorite rail-trail or a multi-day excursion on a regional trail network, you can truly explore and experience a place…the sights, sounds, topography and climate.

Grand Teton Multi-Use Pathway, WY_Camrin Dengel

Grand Teton Multi-Use Pathway, WY – photo by Camrin Dengel

And while bikes are only one way to explore the trails that connect the country, we think they’re a pretty great way to do it!

Transform

Bicycling allows us to transform our lives by giving us the opportunity to prioritize health and family, all wrapped up into one activity! A bicycle is a simple, but transformative, machine. (Few would argue otherwise.)

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Photo by Jillian Imilkowski

As more active-transportation infrastructure projects—including connected, regional trail networks—are planned and constructed across the country, it’ becoming much easier for folks to integrate biking into their daily routines—transforming sedentary, “business-as-usual” habits into vibrant and active ways of life.

Mon River Trail, WV, MCCVB_Steve Shaluta

Mon River Trail, WV, MCCVB- photo by Steve Shaluta

Connect

Not only do bikes allow us to explore and transform, they also connect us with where we need to go. RTC has helped build trail connections through rural areas that spool out over a hundred miles of open prairie, snake through mountain passes and cruise along river canyons. We’ve also helped facilitate connections within urban cores, across state lines and between towns and suburbs, linking communities along vibrant corridors in much the same way as the railroads did in their heyday. And we don’t intend to stop anytime soon!

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W&OD Trail, Virginia – photo by Milo-Bateman

To us, bikes are more than just tools or toys for recreation. They are active transportation’s secret weapon, a means by which to improve our health and well-being while broadening the mobility and access of every member of every community across the nation.

“What do bikes mean to you?” from IMBA

imba_logoby Michelle Barker, IMBA Upper Midwest Region Director

I’m lucky, as I have one of the best jobs in the world—a job that is focused on bikes. As the Upper Midwest Region Director for the International Mountain Bicycling Association, I interact daily with volunteers, land managers and the cycling industry through conversations about mountain biking, how to make it better and how to create more of it. I regularly travel across the Midwest and—along the way—experience great riding in our backyards, National Forest lands, state parks, county and city parks, and even inside old warehouses that have been transformed into all-weather bike parks.

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But mountain biking means so much more to me than just riding; it is a conduit for a variety of opportunities and itself represents opportunity.

In my line of work, bikes are an opportunity to engage with amazing volunteers who give generously of their time, energies and resources. Across the country, passionate volunteers set aside time on their weekends and take time off from their vocations to clear trail debris, meet with partner agencies and host exciting events—all because they desire to provide great mountain biking for themselves, their friends and their communities.

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I have witnessed how mountain biking can also be an opportunity for youth to experience outdoor recreation in their hometowns. I have two boys, ages 11 and 13, and they travel on many of my mountain bike trips to places like Copper Harbor, MI; Cuyuna, MN; and the Twin Cities. But they learned to ride and love riding on their local mountain bike trails, like so many other young people.

Mountain biking also opens the door to community activism and advocacy. My previous career was in education and, so often as a teacher, I heard complaints about apathetic youth. Through mountain biking, I have seen students attend public input meetings, write letters to elected officials, work on mapping projects and engage in conservation projects, all because they love to ride.

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Trails provide a unique opportunity to step off the metaphorical merry-go-round of a responsible adult life and just enjoy being outside on your bike. A quick lunchtime ride clears away the clutter in my brain and creates a happier, more productive me for afternoon work. Riding before work (or to work) puts me in a better place to tackle the day’s challenges and celebrate the day’s successes.

Riding singletrack is an opportunity to spend time with friends and family, and I absolutely love to mountain bike with my girlfriends! We all lead busy lives, so mountain biking is our opportunity to catch up, get outdoors, learn something new and sneak in some exercise. We come away tired, happy, re-energized and full of great, new stories.

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Mountain biking also creates special opportunities for travel. I have traveled with my family across much of the U.S. and even into Canada simply to ride bicycles in each other’s company. Along the way, we experienced excellent trails in each of our destinations and met like-minded people who remain lifelong friends.

Bikes—specifically mountain bikes—create opportunities to meet wonderful, passionate people, ride amazing trails across the country (and around the world), engage in local advocacy efforts, experience outdoor recreation, decompress and enjoy time with friends and family. Bikes are my passion, my avocation and—proudly—my vocation.

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“What do bikes mean to you?” from People for Bikes

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PeopleForBikes has more than a million individual supporters, which means that when you ask what bikes mean to us, you’re actually asking what they mean to each one of those people. With a million individuals you might get a million different answers, and we think that’s just fine. And just like there isn’t one kind of PeopleForBikes supporter, there isn’t one answer to what bikes mean to those who ride. Here are a few ways we could answer that question.

Bikes mean a sense of adventure, on roads or on mountain trails.

For lots of our supporters, biking is how they explore their world. Some of them might do it by riding 100 miles on nearby roads, while others prefer to pedal over rocks and roots on mountain biking trails. Some people travel the world, others find adventure right out their front door. To us, bikes mean discovery, no matter where and how you ride.

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Ride on Chicago – Photo by Jamie Kripke

Bikes mean bonding for friends and families who bike together.

PeopleForBikes sees bicycling as a perfect way to unite people. Parents and children, neighbors and teammates, to us bikes mean fun for everyone. Our goal is to make every bike ride better, so you can enjoy it whether you’re a beginning rider out for the first time or an experienced bicyclist who goes out every week rain or shine.

Bikes mean affordable and convenient transportation for commuters.

Whether you own your own bike, or you use a bike share, biking for transportation is a big part of what bikes mean to us. We support and fund ways to integrate bikes and cycling into the community, like bike lanes, because biking for transportation is what motivates many PeopleForBikes supporters to ride each day.

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Bikes mean victory for competitive bike riders.

The same routes that people take to work Monday through Friday often become part of a racecourse on the weekend. For those riders who get suited up in head-to-toe spandex and ride like the wind, bikes are more than just a tool for getting from point A to point B. PeopleForBikes is for these people too. From downhill mountain biking, to cyclocross, to road racing, bikes are a great way to get the competitive juices going.

What all these different people have in common is that they love biking because of the way it makes them feel. Commuters, recreational riders and racers alike can all agree that when you ride a bike, you feel better. Some call it meditation, others say it’s a form of therapy. We call it shedding the monster. The anger and frustration melts away and you turn from a growling beast into the best version of yourself. Our latest video, Shed the Monster, is our way of saying that when you ride a bike, good things happen. This is what bikes really mean to us, no matter how you ride.

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“What do bikes mean to you?”: Guest Post from the League of American Bicyclists

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The League of American Bicyclists is the oldest bicycle advocacy organization in the country. Founded in 1880, the League believes bikes bring people together.

When more people ride bikes, life is better for everyone; communities are safer, stronger and better connected; our nation is healthier, economically stronger, environmentally cleaner and more energy independent.

So, “what do bikes mean to you?” To us, bikes provide the path to that better life for everyone.

Our mission is to lead that movement to create a bicycle-friendly America for everyone. As leaders, our commitment is to listen and learn, define standards and share best practices to engage diverse communities and build a powerful, unified voice for change. Our vision is of a nation where everyone recognizes and enjoys the many benefits and opportunities of bicycling.

The League has sponsored National Bike Month since 1956, and we look forward to celebrating bikes with local communities near and far every May. But National Bike Month is so much more than 31 days in May.  It’s a celebration of bikes; an impetus to get rolling again; a gateway to riding more often; a time to evangelize the beauty of bikes; and much, much more.

League of American Bicyclists Jim Oberstar Memorial Bike Ride

Jim Oberstar Memorial Ride at 2015 National Bike Summit – Photo by Brian Palmer – Courtesy of League of American Bicyclists

National Bike to Work Week and Bike to Work Day are often cited as the month’s flagship events, occurring the third week and third Friday of May, respectively. Indeed, bike commuting has grown by 62% from 2000 to 2014 — but Bike Month is about so much more than just getting to and from the office.

Everyone can take a leading role in organizing events for Bike Month, whether you’re part of a city government, advocacy group, local business, bike shop, school or any other group interested in making your community better.

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Thousands of organizations, many in the more than 325 League-designated Bicycle Friendly Communities, organize, plan and host events throughout the month of May, introducing bicycling to new riders, cultivating local bike culture and  helping build momentum among the already converted.

The momentum is building: With growing cultural awareness around health and wellness, sustainability and economic savings, bicycling is being seen by new and broader audiences as a simple solution to many complex problems, from reducing obesity rates to increasing mobility options.

And with the help of folks like you, we’ll be able to carry that momentum from Bike Month forward throughout the year. Learn more about all the things the League does throughout the year — from helping businesses, communities and universities become more bike-friendly to uniting the voices of bicyclists on Capitol Hill and amplifying the voices of women, people of color and youth in the bike movement – at bikeleague.org.

May is Bike Month at Performance Bicycle

May is National Bike Month and we’re marking the occasion by helping people across the country get out on their bikes and by making cycling more accessible through support of People for Bikes.

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From May 4-10, cyclists can bring their bikes, no matter where they were originally bought, into any of Performance Bicycle’s 100+ nationwide locations to receive a free safety inspection to get ready for national Bike to Work Week, May 11-15. A Performance Bicycle specialist or Spin Doctor mechanic will take about 5 minutes to inspect the main components of each bike to ensure the gears, brakes, tires and wheels are in working order.

“Each year, we look forward to National Bike Month and kicking it off with free safety inspections to help new and experienced cyclists get out and ride,” said Performance Bicycle CEO David Pruitt.

Performance Bicycle has partnered with PeopleForBikes, a charitable foundation with a goal of making every ride better by collaborating with riders, businesses, community leaders and elected officials to improve cycling infrastructure.  Cyclists can make an in-store or online donation of $2 to support PeopleForBikes’ mission of by creating more trails, bike parks and protected bike lanes. Performance will match up to $10,000 of all donations collected. “We are very excited to be partnering with PeopleForBikes.  Our combined advocacy efforts for improved cycling infrastructure across the country are essential in making cycling more accessible and enjoyable for everyone,” said Pruitt. “It’s really quite simple – cyclists need more and safer places to ride.”

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All Performance Bicycle stores will lead teams in the PeopleForBikes National Bike Challenge, a nationwide event running May through September that unites thousands bicyclists across the country.  All cyclists, no matter what level of experience, are invited to join their local store’s team where they can log their miles and find support and encouragement from other cyclists in their area.  Riders join their local store team by creating an account on the National Bike Challenge website and searching “Performance Bicycle (City Name).”

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All 100+ retail locations will be hosting free cycling clinics on Thursdays and Saturdays that will provide tips and tricks on maintenance and repair, getting back into cycling and riding with others. The full schedule is below:

  • May 2 – Getting Back On The Bike
  • May 7Basic Bike Maintenance And Commuting Tips
  • May 9 – Basic Bike Maintenance
  • May 16 – How To Ride With Other People
  • May 23 – Riding With Kids (a clinic for parents and children)
  • May 28 – Brake, Gear And Derailleur
  • May 30 – Trailside And Roadside Repair

We’ll also be sharing photos, tips of the day and more throughout the month of May on our Facebook and Twitter accounts. And we’re hosting a photo contest where cyclists are encouraged to use the hashtag #mybikemonth when posting their cycling photos for a chance to win 1 of 2 bikes!

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Ridden and Reviewed: Diamondback Haanjo Trail Cyclocross Bike

Diamondback Haanjo Trail Cyclocross Bike

Diamondback Haanjo Trail Cyclocross Bike (we installed pedals and water bottle cage for our test rides)

One of our favorite bikes of 2014, Diamondback’s Haanjo is back and better than ever for 2015 – this time in 4 different flavors. The updated 2015 versions take the Haanjos we loved from last year and step everything up a notch. We’ve been lucky enough to have a Diamondback Haanjo Trail Cyclocross Bike – 2015 in our test stable for a few months now, and it’s just a bike that feels right as soon as you hop on it. It will probably be one of the most versatile bikes you’ll ever own – perfect for everything from ‘cross racing to gravel grinding to touring to commuting to light trail riding.

The Ride

Diamondback designed this bike around their ‘Endurance Geometry’, which translates to a slacker head tube and longer wheelbase than a standard cyclocross bike. Then they layered on wide handlebars, fatter tires, and disc brakes for the ultimate in confidence and control. And that’s exactly the sensation that you get when you throw a leg over the Haanjo Trail.

This bike begs you to have fun when you go out for a ride – you can start out on the road, then veer off on that dirt road you just found, and even hit some single track on the way back. We even rode the Haanjo Trail on snow-covered trails, just because we couldn’t resist. Will this bike replace a dedicated skinny-tire road bike? Not exactly, but that’s not the goal with the Haanjo Trail. It’s a bike that lets you find whatever adventure comes your way on a ride: on-road, off-road or on your commute!

The Parts

The Diamondback Haanjo Trail Cyclocross Bike – 2015 is equipped with top-end components all around – starting with rock-solid and dependable Shimano Ultegra 6800 11-speed shifting components mated to an FSA Gossamer cyclocross crankset with 46/36T chainrings so you have plenty of gearing options for pavement and trail (this cross gearing is really valuable off-road).

HED disc-brake wheels provide a lightweight, fast, and durable set of hoops that can take anything you throw at them. Braking is handled by TRP’s excellent Hy/Rd system, which uses a traditional mechanical cable to actuate a hydraulic brake cylinder, giving you the simplicity of mechanical brakes and the stopping power of hydraulics.

The Haanjo Trail‘s frame is fully butted 6061 T6 aluminum tubing, with a tapered, integrated head tube for better steering response, control, and road absorption. A Gravel Disc Performance full monocoque carbon fiber fork rounds out the package, and smooths your ride. Our one quibble with the package has to do with the Kenda Happy Medium Pro 700×35 tires – while we loved the high volume and smooth rolling of these tires, we wished for more tread when we took the bike off road. With that said, the tires are a great compromise if you are riding a wide variety of terrain, on and off road. But you may want to swap them for something more rugged if you are spending more time on trails (don’t worry, there is ample clearance for this).

The Other Haanjos

Now if the Diamondback Haanjo Trail Cyclocross Bike – 2015 is not exactly what you are looking for, don’t give up on the Haanjo series just yet. The Diamondback Haanjo Comp Cyclocross Bike – 2015 takes the same DNA as the Haanjo Trail and outfits it with a bit more affordable parts.

Diamondback Haanjo Metro in action

Diamondback Haanjo Metro Plus in action

The Diamondback Haanjo Metro Plus Flat Bar City Bike – 2015 builds off of the same frame but ends up with an ultimate commuter package with swept-back handlebars and fenders. And finally the Diamondback Haanjo Flat Bar Cyclocross Bike – 2015 dials in the same go-anywhere mentality in a sport/fitness-oriented bike concept.

Diamondback has worked really hard this year to make sure that there is a Haanjo available for almost every type of rider – as long as you want to have a great time when you ride! Check out a video of the Diamondback Haanjo Trail Cyclocross Bike in action:

Ridden and Reviewed: Fuji Tread 1.1 Disc Road Bike

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The Fuji Tread 1.1 Disc Road Bike is an eye-catching bike, with it’s blacked-out look (with a few bright green highlights) and disc brakes. But what kind of bike is it, exactly? Is it a road bike with disc brakes, a commuter bike for utilitarian rides, or a gravel/adventure/cyclocross bike with slick tires? The beauty of the Tread is that it’s a little bit of all of these things – a truly versatile package that mixes an appealing design with a whole lot of practicality and performance. We’ve put in some hard miles on this Tread 1.1 Disc and came away impressed by the total package.

The Parts:

But let’s start with what you get with the Fuji Tread 1.1 Disc in terms of components. At it’s core is an aluminum custom-butted frame (based on their tried and true alloy cyclocross frame), carbon bladed and tapered fork, a capable Shimano Tiagra 20-speed drivetrain, and lightweight TRP SPYRE mechanical disc brakes. Oval Concepts supplies the handlebars, stem, seatpost, and Vera Terra wheels are clad in 700 x 32C Vera City Wide tires with Phalanx puncture protection for added safety.

On The Road

The Fuji Tread 1.1 Disc Road Bike has comfortable on-road manners with a sporty and quick steering response. It’s not a super-lightweight road racing machine, but a 50/34 tooth crankset and smooth-rolling tires (even though they are 32mm wide) mean that you can keep up with groups on the road or keep up a brisk pace on solo rides. We rode the Tread 1.1 Disc out on some fast group rides here at our office, and we only really felt at a disadvantage on climbs when the group was pushing the pace – the main culprit was the slight added weight and size of the tires as compared to super-light carbon racing bikes (which is no real surprise given the versatility of the bike).

Fuji Tread 1.1 Disc on the road

The Tread 1.1 Disc was a smooth roller on the road

 On Gravel

On gravel or dirt roads, the comfy wide tires and disc brakes of the Tread 1.1 Disc really shined. The stopping power and added control of mechanical disc brakes are a big plus when conditions aren’t great, so it’s no wonder that we were fans of the TRP SPYRE specced on the Tread 1.1 Disc. And while the 700 x 32C tires were not knobby, they had sufficient traction for most situations. We were even impressed by the Shimano Tiagra drivetrain – it has a light shifting feel and performed flawlessly for us, plus the 12-30 speed cassette allowed us to tackle any terrain.

Fuji Tread 1.1 Disc on a gravel road

Gravel roads were no problem for the Tread 1.1’s wide tires

Everything Else

The key word with the Fuji Tread 1.1 Disc Road Bike is versatility – it’s a bike you can ride around town, on the back roads, or just on weekend rides. It’s a great option for a utility commuter bike – there are eyelets for racks and fenders – but it’s not limited to any one ride or terrain. We even took the Tread 1.1 Disc out onto some local trails and had a blast. So what kind of bike is the Fuji Tread 1.1 Disc Road Bike after all? It’s whatever you want it to be – and a whole lot of fun on 2 wheels.

Fuji Tread 1.1 Disc on the trails

Even light trail riding was no problem with the wide gearing range of the Tread 1.1

If the Fuji Tread 1.1 Disc Road Bike isn’t exactly the bike you are looking for, you should also check out the rest of the Fuji Tread lineup. There are several other options and specs available, including an exclusive Fuji Tread 1.0 Disc Road Bike, which upgrades to Shimano’s excellent redesigned 105 5800 11-speed components.

Holiday Hack: DIY Bike Wheel Wreath and Ornaments

With the holidays coming up, it’s time to start digging through your spare parts bin to create some Christmas decor that shows off your cycling spirit. It only takes a few minutes to pull off these bike-inspired designs – and you’ll end up with the coolest decorations on the block!

5 Steps to Create a Bicycle Wheel Wreath

Christmas Bike Wheel WreathThis twist on the classic wreath couldn’t be more simple to put together. All that you need to make it happen is an old wheel, some decorative garland, a string of christmas lights, some zip ties, and a big red bow or a few ornaments. Click on the images below to view the step-by-step instructions:

2 Easy Chain Link Ornaments

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Here’s a quick and easy way to make some cool little ornaments out of those leftover bits of chain that you always end up with after installing a new one. Click on the images below to view the step-by-step instructions:

Cassette Tree Topper and Ornaments

Do you have a pile of old cassettes gathering dust in the corner? Stack them on top of the tree to make an unusual tree topper, or just pull out individual cogs and hang them up as ornaments. Just make sure to clean them off first! Click on the images below to view more:

Post your cycling holiday decoration ideas in the comments!

New Performance Exclusive Fall Cycling Clothing

The days are getting shorter, but that doesn’t mean it’s time to hang up the bike. Equip yourself with the right clothing, and you’ll be able to perform your best in any weather. Our latest lineup of exclusive Performance fall cycling clothing has everything you need to battle the elements in style and comfort. Check out some highlights from our new gear below, or download our 2014 Fall/Winter Clothing digital catalog to see everything in the collection.

The core of winter riding

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The Performance Krio Thermal Jersey gives you thermal protection that will keep you warm and comfortable. Wear it along or layered under your favorite jacket for season-long warmth.

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The Performance Women’s Neve Thermal Jersey is constructed from soft thermal fabric with a perfect fit, so you stay warm and comfortable in cooler weather. Pair it with your favorite jacket to ride all season long.

Essential Lightweight Warmth

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Perfect by themselves on milder days, or as baselayers when the temperature drops, these lightweight long sleeve jerseys are ideal for any season – Peformance Women’s Chill II Long Sleeve Jersey on the left; Performance Men’s Stratos II Long Sleeve Jersey on the right.

 Every Day Jerseys

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With contemporary styling and soft fabrics, our casual riding jerseys are comfortable enough to wear all day long, have the technical features to make riding in the city easy, and styling that looks good in the saddle or at the coffee shop – Performance Women’s Tone Henley Long Sleeve Jersey on the left; Performance Whisk Henley Long Sleeve Jersey on the right.

 Winter Essentials

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Perfect for variable temperatures, the Performance Ultra Bib Knickers feature a new physiodynamic construction and an ergo-panel design that hugs your muscles and provides the best fit without restricting movement. Italian chamois with Skyve technology eliminates all possible pressure points while enhancing breathable support, while reflective details on front and back keep you visible in low light.

Stay Dry On The Inside

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With a waterproof 2.5 layer shell, the Performance Impasse II Rain Jacket not only stops wind and water dead in their tracks, it keeps the elements outside, so you stay warm and dry and ride your best.

Keep Your Jersey Dry & Visible

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The clear membrane of the Performance Dewer Rain Jacket keeps you dry and puts your jersey on full display. Water-repellent and wind-resistant fabric protect you, and a streamlined fit increases aerodynamics, while reflective details keep you visible in overcast weather.

Summer Success Is Earned In Winter

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The Performance Zonal II Softshell Jacket is made from incredibly warm and weather-resistant bonded fleece. The highly breathable design lets body heat escape without letting cold air in, so you can stay warm without overheating. Integrated stretch lets you move freely while riding.

Ride Hard. Stay Warm. Look Great.

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Perfectly styled for comfort on cold rides, the Performance Women’s Flurry II Softshell Jacket is the ideal blend of warmth and weather protection. Made from incredibly warm, bonded fleece which holds in heat while repelling wind and water, it has tons of reflectivity for safety in low light. It’s highly breathable design releases hot air, so you won’t feel clammy, and integrated stretch lets you move freely while riding.

Our Best Gloves Yet

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Our updated line of cold weather gloves has new fabrics, new fits, and is hands-down the best value for your digits. The Performance Cabot Softshell Gloves feature Softshell Drytex fabric that is wind-resistant, water-repellent and highly breathable. Synthetic suede palm with gel pad dissipate vibrations and prevent hand fatigue.

The Performance Tok Weatherproof Full Finger Gloves are constructed for extreme weather protection and warmth, with a weatherproof shell to block the elements and brushed interior with fiber-filled insulation traps heat inside. Silicone finger/thumb details improve lever grip and are touch screen compatible. The Performance Tok Weatherproof Split Finger Gloves are perfect for those really cold days.

Check out the 2014 Fall/Winter Clothing digital catalog for more gear.

Women’s Pro Cycling: La Course by Le Tour de France

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La Course by Le Tour de France

The upcoming La Course by Le Tour de France race is going to shine a spotlight on women’s pro cycling, as top women’s teams will be competing on the same finishing circuit in Paris just hours before the final stage of the men’s Tour de France, including the famous finish on the Champs Elysees. While this 90km race is not the same as having a full 3 week Grand Tour, holding it on the same day and location as the final stage of the men’s race means that it will get coverage for an elite women’s race unlike anything that’s happened before. We are excited to watch a great race and see an emphasis on women’s pro cycling – especially the Optum Pro Cycling presented by Kelly Benefit Strategies team racing on their Diamondback bikes!

Equal pay for equal pain

A few weeks ago we got the opportunity to see some of these pro cyclists in action at the Philly Cycling Classic, one of the toughest one day races on the women’s cycling calendar. The slogan of the race was “equal pay for equal pain”, as the men’s and women’s races featured equal prize money. The race was a fantastic showcase for women’s cycling, with a closely fought competition only settled on the last climb of the Manayunk Wall, when Evelyn Stevens pulled out victory in a ferocious sprint.

Q+A session with top female pros at the Philly Cycling Classic

Q+A session with top female pros at the Philly Cycling Classic

Importance of sponsoring women’s pro cycling

One of the most interesting parts of the weekend was the chance to hear directly from the pros at a question and answer session before the race. Before the cyclists spoke, Karen Bliss, Vice President of Marketing for Fuji, talked about how important it was for Fuji to sponsor riders and teams – for product development, brand recognition, and authority in the cycling world. Fuji puts a special focus on supporting and developing women’s teams because they see the potential for growth – Karen is an accomplished former professional rider herself, a seven-time national champion on the road and track, and sits on the UCI women’s cycling commission. Also speaking was Lisa Nutter, the wife of the Mayor of Philadelphia – she is an avid cyclist and a huge advocate for cycling in Philadelphia. Mrs. Sutter got back into cycling in her 40s, and now seriously competes on the track and the road – she was a big influence on the “equal pay for equal pain” idea.

 Can we compete with the men? We’d like to find out!

As the pros got the chance to answer questions, it became clear that they are just as dedicated, motivated and competitive as the male pros, but their opportunities for exposure and financial success were not the same. Alison Powers, the current US national road, criterium and time trial champion, spoke about there needed to be a change of mindset for cycling fans, promoters, and her fellow female pros – they needed to create an expectation for better treatment and improved exposure. This would lead to better teams, races, and opportunities to grow the sport. Her fellow pros train as much as the men, 8-20 hours a week, but they don’t train for the same distance since the UCI limits their races to 140km. When asked if female pros could compete in a men’s race, Powers and other replied that if they did train for the same distance as the men, they could probably hang in the race – maybe not to the end, but they’d like the chance to find out!

So the biggest difference between the men and women pro riders was in the opportunities they had to succeed. When asked if they also worked full time in addition to their racing, almost every pro in attendance raised her hand to say that they had to work another job – this might be expected at a lower level men’s team, but these were some of the top women’s teams in the world. That’s why the opportunity to showcase their talent at a showcase as big as La Course by Le Tour de France is such a big deal. We hope that it opens some doors, and some eyes, for just how entertaining women’s pro cycling can be.

What do you think would improve the acceptance of women’s pro cycling?

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