What Would You Do With a $4000 Shopping Spree at Performance Bicycle?

If you are anything like us, then you can’t stop daydreaming about what you’d get if someone gave you a blank check to update your cycling gear. If you win the $4000 Shopping Spree at Performance you’ll get your chance! One lucky winner will get $4000 in Performance Gift Cards to spend on whatever they would like from PerformanceBike.com or one of our local stores. To get you started with some ideas for what to get if you win, we surveyed a few coworkers here at our home office for what they would get if they won.

Mark – one of our product developers:

Mark's $4000 mountain bike selections

Mark’s $4000 all-mountain selections

Mark wanted to upgrade his all-mountain ride, so he went with a Devinci mountain bike along with a few select upgrades to round out the package: Devinci Troy XP 27.5″ Mountain Bike – 2014Thomson Elite Dropper SeatpostRace Face SixC Carbon Riser HandlebarGiro Gauge MTB ShoesSmith Pivlock Overdrive Multi-Lens Eyewear 2014.

Eddie – analyst on our Marketing team:

Eddie's ultimate mountain bike upgrade selections

Eddie’s ultimate mountain bike upgrade selections

Eddie wants to update his mountain bike into the ultimate race-ready rocket, so he picked a sweet upgrade kit: SRAM XX1 Mountain 11-Speed Mountain Bike KitSRAM XX Front Disc BrakeSRAM XX Rear Disc BrakeSRAM 29″ Rise 60 Carbon Mountain Bike Front WheelSRAM 29″ Rise 60 Mountain Bike Rear Wheel – XD Driver

Eric – Merchant Assistant:

Eric's road bike-centric selections

Eric’s road bike-centric selections

Eric is all about going fast on his road bike, so he picked a selection of aero & power upgrades: PowerTap G3 SES 3.4 Carbon Tubular Shimano Wheelset, a pair of Vittoria Corsa CX III OE Tubular Road TiresGarmin Edge 510 GPS BundleLouis Garneau Course Road HelmetThera-Roll Textured Therapy Foam Roller, and a Luxe Bamboo Go! Towel.

Alicia – Clothing Product Developer:

Alicia's mountain bike, home shop & road training upgrades

Alicia’s mountain bike, home shop & road training upgrades

Alicia wanted to upgrade her mountain bike & the gear to go with it, outfit her dream home workshop, plus get a road bike for training: Park Tool PK-65 Professional Tool KitPark Tool PRS-25 Team Issue Work StandFox 34 Float 29 140 FIT CTD Suspension Fork with Trail Adjust 2014Mavic Crossroc 29 WTS Mountain WheelsetGiro Xar MTB HelmetSidi Women’s Dominator Fit MTB ShoesDakine Women’s Siren ShortsDakine Women’s Juniper Short Sleeve JerseyDakine Women’s Sentinel Gloves, and a Schwinn Fastback 3 Women’s Road Bike – 2014.

Just remember that you can’t win if you don’t ENTER NOW on our Facebook page – contest ends on 5/4/14.

Product Profile: Nuun Active Hydration

nuun active hydration

You may have seen one of the tubes of Nuun active hydration (pronounced “Noon”) in one of our local Performance Bicycle stores and wondered what was up with these tiny tabs that you drop into your water bottle. Nuun was originally the brainchild of a professor from the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. An avid cyclist, he longed for a lightweight, easy to use hydration method that didn’t involve a sticky high-calorie mess. His research led to the creation of the sugarless, dissolvable, and portable tablet called Nuun – separating electrolyte replacement from carbohydrates. You get the electrolytes your body needs during a hard ride, without the sugars or carbohydrates that can cause stomach upset or inhibit absorption.

Nuun Active Hydration

Nuun Active Hydration Drink Tablets

Nuun Active Hydration Drink Tablets

The original Nuun Active Hydration drink tabs are portable, taste great and deliver a fast-absorbing electrolyte blend without the sugar or waste of bottled sport drinks. Just pop out a Nuun tablet from the tube, drop it in your water bottle, toss the tube in your jersey pocket and you’re ready to go. It also contains 4 essential electrolytes that when combined with water, give you optimal and balanced hydration — sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium. Plus the refreshing flavor with a bit of fizz reminds you to keep drinking.

Nuun All Day Hydration

Nuun All Day Natural Hydration Drink Tablets

Nuun All Day Natural Hydration Drink Tablets

Nuun All Day Hydration drink tablets are a vitamin enhanced formula to help you stay hydrated throughout the day. They’ll keep you healthy, energized and focused, with a crisp, refreshing flavor that goes down easy. With zero sugar, all natural ingredients, and under 8 calories per serving, you can add more water to your daily routine with Nuun All Day.

Nuun Energy

Nuun Energy

New Nuun Energy tablets

The newest member of the Nuun family is Nuun Energy drink tablets. Nuun Energy takes their essential electrolyte mix and elevates it with a caffeine boost, and energizing B Vitamins. There is still no sugar, just the same light and refreshing Nuun flavors with the electrolytes you need to make the most of your water, but enhanced with B Vitamins to turn carbohydrates into accessible fuel and caffeine to energize your mind and body without the crash.

You can buy Nuun online at PerformanceBike.com and in your local Performance Bicycle store.

 

Check out our Learning Center for more info from our Advanced Guide to Hydration.

Fat Bikes, Gravel Bikes and More from the North American Handmade Bicycle Show 2014

Since the 2014 edition of the North American Handmade Bicycle Show was right down the road from our home office, as it was held only a few hours away in Charlotte, NC, we couldn’t miss out on the chance to see what this creative array of small and custom bike builders have been dreaming up. While many of their designs aren’t for everyone, that’s precisely the point! Having a small and nimble design and build team (of sometimes just one person) means that they can cater to niche markets and often anticipate new trends in the cycling industry.

So what did we notice while we perused the convention hall – well, quite a bit of creativity! But one of the big trends (pardon the pun) was the growing number of fat bikes on display, in a wide array of sizes, colors, suspension and utility:

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Gravel bikes were also on display from many builders, again in a variety of shapes and sizes. The line gets kind of fuzzy between gravel and cyclocross bikes, but the idea for a gravel bike is one that you can ride any where – on road, off road, and everything in between. Wide tires, lots of clearance, and disc brakes were common factors on these do-anything “road” bikes.

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But a lot of the fun of the Handmade Bicycle Show is just taking a look at the creative and sometimes wacky designs on display – all a direct reflection of the builder and the person that the bike was designed for.

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And finally, while we didn’t catch them all, we also loved checking out the headbadges that each bike builder used on their bikes – one last bit of personality to finish off a frame!

Custom Cycling Clothing from Champion System and Performance Bicycle

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We are happy to announce that we have partnered with Champion System, a worldwide leader in custom technical apparel, to offer custom cycling clothing through PerformanceBike.com. Our partnership with Champion System allows us to offer high quality, great looking cycling clothing for your team or club, or even for individuals who want their own unique kits. Basically, if you can dream it up, Champion System can make it happen!

The custom clothing option is available on PerformanceBike.com and Champion System will facilitate the process, from design through delivery. Champion System offers cycling and triathlon custom apparel, as well as a full line up of casual technical apparel and accessories. All items are available through our custom order page on PerformanceBike.com.

*Please note – custom clothing orders do not qualify for Team Performance points and all returns must be handled through Champion System directly.

Customization

Start with a blank canvas and customization options are endless – from colors to styles to design.

Later this month we will be hosting a “Design a Jersey Contest” where we will showcase the possibilities of Champion System custom clothing on PerformanceBike.com. The public will vote for a winner from the top designs – the winner will then receive a copy of their jersey design to ride in and see their winning design offered as a Limited Edition Performance Bicycle Summer Jersey available at PerformanceBike.com. We’ll post more details of this contest soon – but start sketching out your jersey designs now!

9 Questions with Cyclocross Pro Jonathan Page

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Fuji Altamira CX 1.0 Cyclocross Bike that Jonathan Page rode in 2013

Fuji Bikes is proud to sponsor 4-time U.S. National Cyclocross Champion Jonathan Page, so we got in touch for a few quick questions before he represents the United States once again at the UCI Cyclo-cross World Championships in Hoogerheide, the Netherlands. Jonathan Page has had an illustrious ‘cross racing career, including a 2007 CX Worlds silver medal, in addition to his 4 U.S. titles and numerous top placings in Europe – last year he raced on the Altamira CX 1.0 cyclocross bike, and this year he’s upgraded to the top end 1.1 model. The 37-year-old is based in Belgium – he’s the only American man to race full time in the rough and tumble of European cyclocross, battling for respect every week. He writes a great blog on CyclingNews that details his ongoing adventures, but read on below for 9 quick questions from this American cyclocross superstar:

How did you get started racing cyclocross?

I started racing because my best friend growing up raced ‘cross.

Jonathan_Page_6Why do you race cyclocross in Europe full time?

I wanted to race against the best in the world, so I came to Belgium.

Photo by Martin Steele, Endura Ltd

Photo by Martin Steele, Endura Ltd

What’s the best part and the hardest part of being a pro cyclist?

Best part is getting to be outside. Worst part is that it is 24 hours a day.

Jonathan_Page_5What was your favorite or best race this season and why?

Bredene, because I was able to battle for 6th place even with broken ribs.

Jonathan_Page_8Who’s the most important person on your race support team?

Everyone on my support team is really important to me. Without my family, friend and mechanic Franky, sponsors, and supporters, I wouldn’t be doing this.

Jonathan_Page_3Does your family travel with you during the season?

This year, much less than I would have liked. But they are with me now, on my way to the Nommay World Cup in France, so that’s great!

Jonathan_Page_4What’s the biggest mistake that you see amateur cyclists make when they train and what’s your best advice for them?

I don’t think there is a cover-all answer for the mistake part of this question. My best advice is just to have fun!

Photo by Martin Steele, Endura Ltd

Photo by Martin Steele, Endura Ltd

If you could ride your bike anywhere in the world, where would you go?

Right now, anywhere sunny would be great, as it hasn’t stopped raining since I got back from the USA. But I think my favorite place to ride is in the Swiss Alps, with cows bells ringing all around me.

Jonathan_Page_9What do you have in your pocket when you go for a training ride?

I keep it simple – only my phone and a Clif Mojo Bar or 2.

Check out this video from Global Cycling Network for an in-depth look at Jonathan’s Fuji Altamira CX cyclocross race bike.

All photos © Wil Matthews (unless otherwise noted)

Real Advice: How To Store Your Bicycles Inside

The first step to storing your bikes is admitting that you have a problem – when your bikes are taking up more space in your house than your actual furniture, then it’s time to look into some storage solutions! There are a lot of opinions and differing ideas about the best way to store your bicycle. We’ve used them all, so we’re here to help. What follows are some easy ways to keep your bikes organized and out of the way around the house, while maintaining your relationship with your significant other.

Bike Storage Hook

Performance Bike Storage Hook

The simplest option is the humble Storage Hook – it doesn’t get much easier than this. Screw this rubberized hook into the wall and you’re good to go – just hang your bike from the front or rear wheel and let the bike hang down. We highly recommend using a stud finder and drilling a pilot hole to make sure that it’s secure enough to hold the weight of your bike. You can also use two of these if you’re going to hang your bike from the ceiling and you’re comfortable lifting your bike over your head each time you want to put it away.

Hang 2 Plus rack

XPORT Hang 2 Plus Bike Hanger

If you’d like a little more versatility, you could consider an option like the XPORT Hang 2 Plus Bike Hanger. With a rack like this, you can put two bikes very close to one another (you’ll probably have to flip the orientation for the second one) and put gear on the shelf behind it. We would recommend clipping your helmet to the shelf and adding gear on top as needed. One drawback with this system is that the bikes stick out a bit out from the wall.

Bikes Aloft 2 rack

XPORT Bikes Aloft 2 Storage Rack

If you’d like to be a little more space conscious, you might consider an option like the XPORT Bikes Aloft 2 Storage Rack. This is our go-to bike storage option. You’ll find them all over the Performance home office and even used in our retail stores and at events. This is because the rack is extremely space conscious and also very easy to set up. It doesn’t require drilling into walls, so it’s great for apartments or rooms where you may not always want to have your bike. Because one bike is directly above the other, the footprint of this rack is equal to one bike.

Bicycle Hoist

Transit Bicycle Hoist

If you have high ceilings and would like to open up some space by lifting the bike out of the way, you might consider a rack like a Transit Bicycle Hoist. This system takes a bit of effort to set up, but once it’s in place it is very easy to use, and you’ve got some instant bike art elegantly on display!

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XPORT Bike Cover

One final option is just to cover up your bikes with something like this XPORT Bike Cover, so that at least you won’t get grease all over your new couch. And if you’re unfortunate enough to have to store a bike outdoors on a regular basis, you definitely need a bicycle cover. This will keep some of the elements off of your bicycle – just make sure to keep that chain lubed!

Are there any circumstances we haven’t covered? Any strange bike storage options you’ve used in the past? Let us know in the comments section below.

6 Ways To Recycle Your Cycling Gear

We all know that cycling is good for the environment, but we still end up with old, worn-out cycling gear that is destined for the dumpster. We’ve discovered 6 ways to recycle your old cycling gear – and change it from trash to treasure.

1. Recycling tubes or tires

Tires and tubes are the one part on the bike that you can go through at a rapid rate. Since they are rubber based, recycling is a great option. At every Performance Bicycle location, we have a blue recycling bin where we accept tires and tubes for recycling. We share all of that rubber with Liberty Tire and they use it to make everything from Olympic weights to playground mulch. All you have to do is drop off your used tubes or worn out tires and we’ll do the rest.

recycle_fixture

Tube & tire recycling fixture at your local Performance Bicycle

If you don’t live near a Performance location, check with your local auto tire shop. They will often send piles of auto tires in to places like Liberty Tire and may take your bicycle tires and tubes for free. Be considerate though as they often have to pay to have their tires recycled, so asking them to do something for free that they have to pay for is asking them for a real favor.

One more option would be to box up and mail your tires/tubes to someone like Alchemy Goods. Alchemy recycles tires and tubes, turning them into everything from messenger bags and saddle bags to wallets and belts.

2. Passing on the love

The number one way this sport grows is through the generosity of others. We were all new to the sport at one point. Someone showed us how to use clipless pedals, when to signal, how to take over a lane to make a left turn, how to ride in a pace-line, or how to jump over a log. The best thing you can do for the sport of cycling is to take someone under your wing. For example, if you just bought pedals, why not your old pair on to someone who might get into the sport because of your generosity? So, be a cycling advocate and lend a hand to someone in need.

3. Making art

This one’s not for everyone. Some people just don’t have an eye for it. Still, if you’re artistically minded and have used bike parts lying around, why not combine your passion for cycling with your talent for art? We’ve seen some great examples of Christmas ornaments made out of bicycle chains, picture frames made from old bike parts, bracelets make from old spokes, or wind chimes made out of used chainrings. You don’t have to be a top etsy seller to make your mom a special hand-made birthday gift. Just think of the money you save and can justify putting towards new cycling parts!

4. Building bikes for those in need

Most large communities have bicycle co-ops. A bicycle co-op is an organization that recycles old bicycle parts and uses volunteer labor to build bicycles for people in need, often children. Many times they will have a program in place whereby a person in need can volunteer their time and earn themselves a bicycle. Volunteering for a program like this will give you another opportunity to give back to the cycling community and will also present many chances for donating some of your used bike parts. What seems like a worn out crankset to you, could be the missing piece necessary to helping someone without means to build a bike that they can use to get to work.

These organizations are everywhere. Ask your local shop if you can’t find one. Maybe your community needs one and you can start one yourself!

5. Metal Recycling

The one other part on your bicycle that you should be replacing with some regularity is your chain. At your nearest Performance Bicycle location, we also accept worn out chains, which we ship to Resource Revival. Resource Revival uses the chains to make all sorts of creative products from bottle openers to award medals. Even if you’re not near a Performance retail location, you can still utilize Resource Revival by collecting and mailing chains yourself or helping your local shop collect them. Instructions can be found on the Resource Revival website.

If this isn’t a feasible opportunity or if you have more metal than you know what to do with, you might try searching for a local metal recycler. They will often have someone who will pick up piles of old metal from you (frames, wheelsets, etc.) and will haul them off for free.

6. Energy Bar Wrapper Brigade

Our good friends at Clif Bar have partnered with Terracycle to provide an amazing opportunity to recycle used energy bar wrappers. Depending on your rate of consumption, it may take a while before you have enough wrappers saved up, but what about setting up a box in your office? How about bringing a box out to the local group ride and encouraging your friends to save their wrappers for your recycling project. Recycling wrappers can earn you prizes or further charitable causes through Terracycle. Check out the Energy Bar Wrapper Brigade website for more info.

Do you have any other great recycling ideas? Did we miss any of the big ones? Have creative art projects? Share them in the comments section below and let the recycling begin!

How Do You Build a Mountain Bike Trail – Talking with Elevated Trail Design

Fresh new trails are the siren song for mountain bikers – when you hear about a new line or some sweet new singletrack, you have to go and check it out. So when we heard about a new section of trail being built, by professional trailbuilders, on our usual home office lunchtime loop (a 6 mile trail system in a local sustainable development) our ears perked up and we had to know more!

We rode by to check out the construction progress and meet the guys from Elevated Trail Design, otherwise known as Andrew Mueller and Peter Mills. Based out of the Carolinas and Boulder, Colorado, ETD creates trails that integrate unique trail features into the natural landscape while maintaining high standards of safety and sustainability. They offer a variety of natural surface and resurfaced trails for many types of clients, and their specialties include multi-use trails, mountain bike trails, backcountry hiking trails, and bike parks. With experience building both machine built and hand built trails and all types of mountain bike features, they take pride in being a rider-owned company, and strive to secure projects which allow them to build creative and progressive features.

With that in mind, we fired off some questions to Andrew to find out more about what goes into building great trails.

Andrew riding the new trails at Briar Chapel

Andrew riding the new trails at Briar Chapel

How did you get started building trails as a job?

I started building trails the same way a lot of pro trailbuilders do; by building illegal trails. I guess it started around age 12, when digging holes to build jumps (without permission, of course) in the neighborhood was just a good way to get out of our parent’s houses. After all, until you can drive, a bicycle is about the closest thing to freedom that a teenager can get. Spots came and went, jumps were built and torn down, but I knew by the time I was 18 that I loved building bike trails…I just didn’t know it could be a job. My desire to ride and build led me to Appalachian State University, where I studied Geographic Information Systems and Sustainable Development (you could argue that I minored in downhill mountain biking!). I took an internship my senior year at the newly-envisioned Rocky Knob bike park in Boone, NC. We worked alongside a trail contractor, both working on the trails and then mapping them. It all pretty much fell into place from there; I got a job working for a trail company, met Peter Mills, and realized that we should be doing this on our own. We knew that if we wanted to build the unique features and trails that were in our heads, we had to go legit, and Elevated Trail Design was born.

What does it take to design & build a great trail?

I think design is huge.  So much of a trail’s potential comes from its design. Our first step is looking at maps and exploring. I want to know where all the rocks are, find the cool trees, and learn the layout of the terrain before we drop the first flag for the line. The next thing is drainage; you have to understand how water is going to behave if you want to build something that lasts. The last thing is experience. I think what sets Peter and myself apart as bike-specific builders is our diverse backgrounds as riders. We’ve ridden so many different types of trail and terrain that we have a unique vision for what mountain biking should be. We understand how trails evolve beneath knobby tires and how to prepare for that. It’s fun to think back to a fun section you rode in some other place and envision how we can replicate that experience where the users might not expect it.

Pump track built by Elevated Trail Design

Pump track built by Elevated Trail Design

What do you use to build trails?

The tools really depend on the project. A lot of people think pro trailbuilders just drive through the woods with a bulldozer and build some boring trail, but we really try to work with the client to build what he or she wants. We do machine built and handbuilt trails, and I think there are a lot of great things about both.  Nothing beats the artistic quality and minimalist traits of a handbuilt trail, but there are also situations where a machine can build better product in less time. I can confidently say that learning how to build trail with an excavator has made me much better at handbuilt trail and vice versa. For handbuilt trails, we start with chainsaws and blowers, then remove organics and cut the trail with trail tools (Rogue Hoes, Mcleods), then touch up with rakes and loppers. For machine built trail, we only use mini excavators.  The excavator is the ultimate do it all trail machine; we can use it to build minimal trail with rocks and roots, or we can build big dirt features that make places like Whistler famous. Either way, separation of materials is key…it’s all about keeping as much of the good mineral dirt on the trail and discarding the waste materials in a clean fashion.

Technical section at Briar Chapel

Technical section at Briar Chapel

What’s your favorite place to ride?

I’ve ridden a lot of great places, but for this question, I think I have to stick with my roots. I learned to ride in Pisgah National Forest in western North Carolina, and I still have to say it’s my favorite. I love the rugged trails there and the remote feel that they have. I hope that people see that we try to pay tribute to the rocks, roots, and rhododendron of Pisgah even though we’re trying to build sustainable trails and also make a living. Peter would probably tell you his favorite places to ride are Whistler Mountain Bike Park or any nice big dirt jumps. I think that’s what makes us a great team; we draw from different mountain bike experiences and put them all into a totally unique product.

What’s a favorite project that you’ve worked on?

It’s hard to pick just one, but believe it or not, I have to mention a hiking trail here. Last spring we did a 1.5 mile “face-lift” on part of NC’s Mountains-to-Sea trail near Boone, NC. It was called the Boone Fork Trail and it involved hiking into a remote drainage each day to build a huge variety of trail features. We did excavator trail, hand-built, rock armoring, and ladders with local timber, all on one job. Just working in that beautiful setting; with huge hardwoods and cascading rapids all around us every day, made that job really memorable.

New trail in Briar Chapel

New trail in Briar Chapel

What would be your ideal trail?

I like variety in my trails. My favorite trails mix new-school mountain bike trail building with natural terrain. I love a trail when you are smashing through some crazy rocks but there’s a perfect berm at the bottom to hold your speed into the next section. I love turns; if I’m riding in a straight line I better be hitting a nice jump or some roots and rocks, otherwise I’ll be bored! I also love trails that descend through different zones and environments, making you feel like you’re experiencing the forest and having a blast in a way a hiker could never understand.

And of course, near to our hearts, how would you describe the trail you just built at Briar Chapel?

Briar Chapel was just an all-around great project for us. It was a design/build, so it allowed us to show off our full vision and potential as trailbuilders.  We tried to maximize the terrain in every way possible, striving to show people that you can have a rugged and fun mountain bike experience even in a suburban, residential setting. What that vision resulted in is a huge variety of building and riding styles packed into a small amount of trail. We built flowy berms and rollers, tight singletrack, rock gardens, stuff that’s clearly machine-built, stuff that people will think is handbuilt, and stuff that actually is handbuilt.  We were calling it the party trail while we built it; it makes you just want to do lap after lap. If people come there and ride our trail two or three times in different directions, we accomplished our goal [note for locals: please check trail conditions before riding – the new section of trail may not be open yet due to weather].

Peter having fun in Moab, Utah

Peter having fun in Moab, Utah

2013 Year in Review – From Cyclocross Worlds to How to Climb

While we’re already looking ahead at 2014, but as we close out 2013 we wanted to take a moment to look back at some of the best stories and posts that we’ve shared throughout the year – we’ve got even more planned for the coming year, so stay tuned!

aaron_commute_2

Real Advice: Commuting by Bike

Our coworker Aaron’s story of his 20 mile commute struck a chord with many of you out there – check out the comments for tales from fellow commuters.

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Fuji Pro Bikes at the 2013 Amgen Tour of California

In May we were lucky enough to catch a few stages of the Tour of California, where we got an up-close look at 2 very different professional rider’s Fuji bikes.

DSC_0137

Event Recap: 2013 UCI Cyclo-Cross Worlds

Of course we weren’t going to miss seeing the very first Cyclocross World Championship held on US soil – we summed up the craziness in this post from a very chilly and wet Louisville, Kentucky.

chris_peru_creek

Cycling First Aid Essentials – What to Pack

We don’t like to think about, but riding bikes means that sometimes we’re going to crash. Our first aid essentials for cyclists post covers the basics of what to carry to be prepared.

11_speed_shifting

Our Take: 10-Speed vs. 11-Speed

If there’s one post that generated much heated discussion, it was definitely our take on the 10 vs. 11-speed debate – you might be surprised by what we have to say!

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Real Advice: How to Lock Your Bike

There aren’t many worse feelings than having a bike stolen – our Real Advice column breaks down a robust locking strategy to make sure that it won’t happen to you next time.

climbing_brian

Real Advice: An Intro to Climbing

If there’s one thing that most of us would like to do better, it’s learning how to improve our climbing skill – it turns out that it’s not as hard as you think.

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Real Advice: Weight Loss

One of the great side effects of a love for cycling is being able to maintain a healthy weight – but another one of our Real Advice posts covered some straightforward tactics to help you keep the pounds off.

wheels

Real Advice: Wheels

Another great conundrum of cycling – what upgrade provides the best bang for the buck? It’s no secret – we think that it’s all about the wheels.

The Scattante CFR Race

Product Profiles: The Scattante CFR LE and Scattante CFR Race

Finally, we profiled some great gear this year as well – including the latest iteration of our always popular Scattante line of road bikes.

Road Bike Party 2 Video

Martyn Ashton Road Bike Party 2

This doesn’t even look possible!

If you have yet to see the new Road Bike Party 2, featuring the amazing skills of trials-riding impresario Martyn Ashton and friends Danny MacAskill and Chris Akrigg, then you need to stop what you’re doing and watch it now! Even if you have already watched it, do yourself a favor and watch it again:

Despite suffering a serious accident in a trials-riding demonstration earlier this year that left him paralyzed from the waist down (covered in a very good article in Bike Magazine), Ashton was determined to finish this amazing movie as a testament to his will to recover and carry on with his life. His good friends, and equally talented riders, MacAskill and Akrigg, ably filled in for the injured Ashton to complete his vision. After you’ve watched the sequel, don’t forget to check out the original Road Bike Party:

And don’t miss the outtakes reel too, just to show that these guys are human, sometimes:

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