Women’s Pro Cycling: La Course by Le Tour de France

la_course_by_le_tour_de_france_header

La Course by Le Tour de France

The upcoming La Course by Le Tour de France race is going to shine a spotlight on women’s pro cycling, as top women’s teams will be competing on the same finishing circuit in Paris just hours before the final stage of the men’s Tour de France, including the famous finish on the Champs Elysees. While this 90km race is not the same as having a full 3 week Grand Tour, holding it on the same day and location as the final stage of the men’s race means that it will get coverage for an elite women’s race unlike anything that’s happened before. We are excited to watch a great race and see an emphasis on women’s pro cycling – especially the Optum Pro Cycling presented by Kelly Benefit Strategies team racing on their Diamondback bikes!

Equal pay for equal pain

A few weeks ago we got the opportunity to see some of these pro cyclists in action at the Philly Cycling Classic, one of the toughest one day races on the women’s cycling calendar. The slogan of the race was “equal pay for equal pain”, as the men’s and women’s races featured equal prize money. The race was a fantastic showcase for women’s cycling, with a closely fought competition only settled on the last climb of the Manayunk Wall, when Evelyn Stevens pulled out victory in a ferocious sprint.

Q+A session with top female pros at the Philly Cycling Classic

Q+A session with top female pros at the Philly Cycling Classic

Importance of sponsoring women’s pro cycling

One of the most interesting parts of the weekend was the chance to hear directly from the pros at a question and answer session before the race. Before the cyclists spoke, Karen Bliss, Vice President of Marketing for Fuji, talked about how important it was for Fuji to sponsor riders and teams – for product development, brand recognition, and authority in the cycling world. Fuji puts a special focus on supporting and developing women’s teams because they see the potential for growth – Karen is an accomplished former professional rider herself, a seven-time national champion on the road and track, and sits on the UCI women’s cycling commission. Also speaking was Lisa Nutter, the wife of the Mayor of Philadelphia – she is an avid cyclist and a huge advocate for cycling in Philadelphia. Mrs. Sutter got back into cycling in her 40s, and now seriously competes on the track and the road – she was a big influence on the “equal pay for equal pain” idea.

 Can we compete with the men? We’d like to find out!

As the pros got the chance to answer questions, it became clear that they are just as dedicated, motivated and competitive as the male pros, but their opportunities for exposure and financial success were not the same. Alison Powers, the current US national road, criterium and time trial champion, spoke about there needed to be a change of mindset for cycling fans, promoters, and her fellow female pros – they needed to create an expectation for better treatment and improved exposure. This would lead to better teams, races, and opportunities to grow the sport. Her fellow pros train as much as the men, 8-20 hours a week, but they don’t train for the same distance since the UCI limits their races to 140km. When asked if female pros could compete in a men’s race, Powers and other replied that if they did train for the same distance as the men, they could probably hang in the race – maybe not to the end, but they’d like the chance to find out!

So the biggest difference between the men and women pro riders was in the opportunities they had to succeed. When asked if they also worked full time in addition to their racing, almost every pro in attendance raised her hand to say that they had to work another job – this might be expected at a lower level men’s team, but these were some of the top women’s teams in the world. That’s why the opportunity to showcase their talent at a showcase as big as La Course by Le Tour de France is such a big deal. We hope that it opens some doors, and some eyes, for just how entertaining women’s pro cycling can be.

What do you think would improve the acceptance of women’s pro cycling?

A Cycling Tour of Philadelphia with Fuji Bikes

philadelphia_cycling_with_fuji_23

Cycling on the Schuylkill River Trail in downtown Philly

A few weeks ago we got to visit Fuji Bikes in their hometown of Philadelphia, PA, and one of the most interesting parts of our trip, other than riding up the infamously challenging Manayunk Wall, was seeing what the City of Brotherly Love has done to welcome cyclists as a part of the city. We got to ride all over the city with our hosts from Fuji Bikes, and we were constantly impressed by how cycling was incorporated into the fabric of the neighborhoods – no doubt one of the main reasons that Philadelphia was recently ranked the 6th most bikeable city in the US.

philadelphia_cycling_with_fuji_24

Cycling sharrows were prominent on city streets

In the downtown areas of the city, we hardly ever rode on streets that did not have bike lanes or prominent sharrows to indicate that cyclists had the right of way. And folks on bikes definitely took advantage of this infrastructure, with commuters, transportation riders, and recreational cyclists out in force on the city streets. The city government is a big supporter of bike riders, even closing down a stretch of Martin Luther King, Jr Drive to car traffic (along the Schuylkill River) on summer weekends so that cyclists have priority to ride and race.

And speaking of recreation, the bi-directional Schuylkill River Trail was packed with coexisting joggers, walkers and cyclists on most days – which is no wonder since it was such an idyllic spot and easily accessible from downtown. Running from the historic Center City, past the Philadelphia Museum of Art (home of the famous “Rocky Steps”), and historic Boathouse Row, and out along the Schuylkill River into the countryside past Valley Forge – the trail is a fantastic outlet for city riders who want to get away from busy city roads. One stop along the trail that shouldn’t be missed is the cycling-friendly Manayunk neighborhood, with its absurdly steep climbs and bicycle-friendly businesses – definitely stop for lunch at Winnie’s Le Bus Manayunk, where they will loan you a bike lock while you eat!

All in all we had a great time cycling around Philadelphia – it’s got more to offer than just the Liberty Bell and Independence Hall (although you should definitely check those out if you come to visit), with a vibrant cycling scene and easy access to scenic roads and trails from downtown. So next time that you visit the City of Brotherly Love, bring your bike and go for a ride!

Check out the gallery below for some views from our rides:

Team NetApp Endura Visits Fuji’s Home Office

A few weeks ago we were lucky enough to visit the biggest one day bike race in the US, the Philly Cycling Classic, thanks to an invite from our friends at Fuji Bikes. We had a great time checking out the excitement of the race (especially the finish up the famed Manayunk Wall), but the highlight of the trip was a chance to visit the home office of Fuji Bikes (and their sister brands in the Advanced Sports International or ASI family: Kestrel, Breezer and SE Bikes) with the members of the NetApp team, after the race.

Members of Team NetApp posed for a photo with the Fuji Bikes team

Members of Team NetApp posed for a photo with the Fuji Bikes team, including CEO Pat Cunnane (on the right)

ASI moved to their current headquarters in northern Philadelphia, from New Jersey, in 2004 so that they could triple the size of their warehouse.We followed along as the members of Team NetApp got a chance to meet everyone at the ASI offices, especially the bike design team. We learned more about the product development process, from assessing the market and looking at past sales, to talking to customers, attending trade shows, talking to dealers – even reading every bicycle magazine and good old-fashioned research on the internet. It’s definitely an in-depth process! Just the design process for a new bike can take over a year, and it’s not uncommon for a bike to go from concept to delivery to market in 18 months to 2 years.

We also got to learn more about the ASI/Fuji culture – needless to say they are really into bikes! There is a full Fuji demo fleet in their warehouse so that any employee can check out any type of bike for a month. Even though they are located in Philadelphia, they’re also building a full cyclocross course on the grounds near their warehouse, along with some mountain bike trails. And remember the Norcom Straight triathlon/time trial bike? Norcom Road is a favorite stretch of test road just a short ride from their offices. Fuji is also a huge presence in the local cycling community, with one of their main focuses being the Cadence Cycling Foundation – a group that engages youth through the sport of cycling to help them grow into healthy, responsible, and confident adults.

One of the highlights of the tour was the chance for everyone at ASI to have lunch and chat with the members of the NetApp team, all-rounder Blaz Jarc from Slovenia, classics rider Ralf Matzka from Germany, Jonathan McEvoy from the UK (11th place finisher in Philly),  all-rounder Erick Rowsell from the UK, mountain specialist Frantisek Padour from the Czech Republic (who finished 12th in Philly), and Director Sportif Christian Pomer from Austria (a former pro cyclist himself). Fuji associates got the chance to pepper the members of Team NetApp with questions.

They described their Altamira racing bikes as a good quality all-around bike – light, stiff, and with good handling. The hardest race they’d ever done? Without a doubt, Paris Roubaix – they made it to the end, but the Arenberg cobble section was just super hard, since you go straight into it at a really high speed. They also compared Philly Cycling Classic to Europe and said that it was a different style. At Philly the racing was a lot more aggressive, and they were always fighting for position as it never settled down. In Europe, the racing starts hard, but then a break goes, it settles down, and it only gets really hard again at the end. But they loved the atmosphere on the Manayunk Wall (where they may, or may not, have received beer handups at the end of the race).

The team even talked a bit about how they got started in bike racing – most started in their early teens riding for development programs. In England, their academy system finds kids in grade schools and progresses them through their national Olympic training program – they were full time riders from an early age, but not pro until a few years ago.  They also spoke about the stagiare program – wherein a professional team takes on ‘cycling interns’ starting in August. Young riders are released from their U23 team and get what amounts to a try out for a pro team, for free. It’s a big step up from the lower level, and the riders are under a huge amount of pressure to make a good impression in a few months. They even spoke about what they do in their off time – other than ride bikes, they just like to take a few weeks off the bike and not think about racing at all!

It was a great visit with the ASI/Fuji team, and with Team NetApp – we’re excited to cheer for the team as they compete in the Tour de France in July! To get a little sense of what pro racing is like from inside the peloton, check out this video we put together from the Manayunk Wall at the Philly Cycling Classic:

Rep. David Price Visits Performance

U.S. Representative David Price (NC) visited our offices a few weeks ago

U.S. Representative David Price (NC) visited our offices a few weeks ago

A few weeks ago U.S. Representative David Price (NC) was kind enough to take time from his busy schedule to visit our offices in Chapel Hill and meet with some of our employees. After giving him a tour of our offices and telling him a bit about what we do, we had the opportunity to ask him some questions about the role of the bicycle in American transportation, what’s on the horizon with transportation legislation, and what’s up with those Tiger Grants?

U.S. Rep David Price and our CEO tour the Performance offices

U.S. Rep David Price and our CEO tour the Performance offices

Rep. Price touring our warehouse

Rep. Price touring our warehouse

He answered all of our staff’s questions, and shed a lot of light on what is happening in America right now with transportation policy.

Round table discussion with Rep. David Price

Round table discussion with Rep. David Price

The big things that he stressed were:

  1. Transportation policy will depend on people who care about transportation policy, individual health, wellbeing, the environment and livable spaces taking a more active role in government decision making, at the local, state and federal level
  2. Transportation policy isn’t just about paving more roads, it’s about “transportation enhancements” that include rail, transit alternatives, pedestrians and cyclists
  3. On a local level, the more specific we can be with infrastructure improvement plans the better our chances of getting the plans implemented.
Rep. Price also met with many of our warehouse staff

Rep. Price also met with many of our warehouse staff

In short, he highlighted the fact that we need to fight for better transportation alternatives, and for bikes to have a place, and encouraged us all– and you– to keep your representatives at the local, state and national level accountable when it comes to legislation that affects us as cyclists.

 

Helmets: To Wear or Not To Wear?

Two approaches to riding a bike: helmeted and helmetless

At the risk of setting the internet on fire, this is an article about wearing helmets. We’ve seen a few articles lately that seem to have reignited this timeless debate, and thought we’d jump into the fray.

Before you get all fired up, know a few things

  • We believe in the studies that show helmets save lives, and always wear one when we ride
  • This author personally had his life saved, or at least avoided having to relearn the alphabet, by wearing a helmet
  • We haven’t always been stringent helmet wearers, and spent years going lidless (in fact the day I had my accident was almost a lucky chance, at the last minute I completely randomly decided to grab my helmet for my ride to the grocery store)
  • Ultimately the choice whether or not to wear one is up to you

Like politics, helmet wearing tends to be super divisive. The two most vocal camps (though maybe not the most numerous) tend to be:

  1. Helmets are totally unnecessary for the everyday cyclist, and just make cycling seem more unappealing
  2. Helmets offer critical protection, and should be mandatory for everyone.

But in the middle are a huge number of riders who just go out and ride their bikes, do what they do, and don’t really get too worked up about stuff like this.

But for the sake of argument, let’s break down the two opposing views:

 Anti-Helmet:

This mom and daughter in Hasselt, Belgium are just going about their business-- no helmets needed

This mom and daughter in Hasselt, Belgium are just going about their business– no helmets needed

This camp tends to be more the urban/transportation type of rider, who usually bikes at slower speeds, and in slower moving traffic. To these riders, the helmet is simply an impediment to getting people on bikes. There are some valid arguments to be made here, including studies that show that mandatory helmet laws decrease participation, which actually makes riding more dangerous since there are fewer bikes on the road. Others dislike them because they think it makes cycling seem excessively dangerous, or that they do little to prevent injury. These are also valid points—most cyclists will never need the protection a helmet provides, and in the event of an accident, there really is only so much a helmet can do.

Let’s look at some other positives here:

  • Your hair will always look fantastic (unless it’s windy)
  • It’s one less thing to worry about buying
  • Riding helmetless feels more relaxing
  • You won’t get as hot when you ride
Helmet or no, we kind of hope we look like this guy on a bike when we're older. Major steez, for sure

Helmet or no, we kind of hope we look like this guy on a bike when we’re older. Major steez.

Another point that is often cited is that helmet use is relatively uncommon in other industrialized countries, such as in Europe.

When we were in Belgium a few weeks ago, we saw countless people on bicycles in the city going about their commuting and errand-running business without helmets…similar to what we have seen when we’ve visited and ridden in Norway, Denmark, France and Italy (although in all those places we always noticed road and MTB riders wearing helmets). And before you get up in arms about better infrastructure, allow us to say that riding in a city in Europe, even ones with protected bike lanes, can often be more terrifying than riding along a divided highway in the U.S. The roads are tiny, the drivers are unpredictable, and the traffic patterns are utterly incomprehensible. If a car can fit somewhere, then that’s where that car is going—pedestrians, cyclists and legally-binding signage or not.

The point is that people choose to ride bikes, and don’t worry too much about the details.

Couple just out for a ride on a rare warm Belgian evening

Couple just out for a ride on a rare warm Belgian evening

Pro Helmet:

For many, wearing a helmet is a basic safety precaution

For many, wearing a helmet is a basic safety precaution

For others riders, the helmet is a necessary safety precaution, and one that they wouldn’t leave the house without, akin to wearing a seatbelt. Personally, this is the camp we fall into. We freely admit that if you’re struck by one ton of metal at 35mph, there’s only so much some foam and plastic can do, but that simple barrier can, and often does, mean the difference between a traumatic brain injury and a mild headache—as it did for us.

Study after study has shown that helmets can and do reduce the risk of both minor and serious head injury. Many take the view that there is little to be gained and much to be lost by not wearing a helmet. You only get one brain, and the brain is the only part of the body that can’t repair itself, so you better protect it.

Study after study has shown that helmets save lives and can prevent more serious injuries

Study after study has shown that helmets save lives and can prevent more serious injuries

The counter argument to the European philosophy is that you have to be realistic. We might all work toward and strive for that hopefully-near future when North American roads and politics will permit two-wheeled travel the way that some European cities do, but in the here-and-now that is simply not the case, and wishing will not make it so. Drivers here are inattentive, in many communities it’s still uncommon to see people using bicycles for transportation or recreation, and in many cities the roads were simply not designed for pedestrian or bicycle travel. Cycling on many American roads can be dangerous, and while you can’t live in fear, it’s best to take reasonable precautions.

Anecdotally, I was struck by a car in Chicago in a 25mph zone. While this might not seem fast, try riding 25mph on your bicycle and it sure seems fast enough. Even at that slow speed, with an oblique strike, it was powerful enough to throw me to the ground, break my collar bone in two places, fracture my scapula, and smash my helmet. At the ER I was told, verbatim, by the doctor holding my destroyed helmet: “if you hadn’t been wearing this, you would probably be upstairs in intensive care and we’d be calling your family”.

We won’t go so far as to advocate for mandatory helmet laws—at some point personal choice and personal responsibility become factors—but to us wearing a helmet is a smart personal choice.

Every year more and more styles of non-technical helmets become available

Every year more and more styles of non-technical helmets become available

So now that we’ve examined—at least in cursory detail—both sides of the argument, let’s hear your thoughts.

National Bike Month: Meet The Alliance For Biking & Walking

 

logo

As National Bike Month winds down, we bring you the last of our Advocacy Interviews. We had a chance to catch up with the folks from the Alliance For Biking & Walking– an advocacy group that strives to improve our communities by helping to recraft them into more livable spaces.

By lobbying local, state and Federal government organizations, collecting data for governments and groups to use, and helping to found grassroots organizations all over the country, the Alliance has done a lot to help riders and walkers everywhere.

Read on to find out more.

1. What’s the goal of your organization?

Communities are better places when it’s comfortable and safe to get around by bike. And the people who affect change for better biking are the grassroots advocates who make sure that bicyclists’ interests are represented in state and local government. We give advocates tools to win campaigns that transform communities into great places to bike and walk.

11342422154_9085bb3eba_b

The Alliance for Biking & Walking believes that communities are better places to live when it’s easier to get around

2. What projects are you working on currently?

We’re currently organizing a training for city-based advocacy groups who want to build protected bike lane networks in their cities. Advocates are increasingly in positions to push their cities to build awesome protected bike lanes so that everybody can feel comfortable biking around town. We’re going to train about 25 advocates on how to launch campaigns similar to the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition’s Connecting the City initiative, which was a total game-changer for SF.

We’re also organizing our biennial Leadership Retreat, a big pow wow for state and local biking and walking advocates. It’s the homecoming ball of bike/ped advocacy.

11342701834_21dfae9a00_b

Events large and small are important for increasing visibility for biking

3. What actions can I take locally to make the experience of cycling better in my community?

Get involved at the local level through being a member, volunteering, donating, and encouraging others to get involved. Local advocates are the folks who are responsible for getting bike lanes on the ground, passing pro-bike legislation, and building bike share systems.

If there isn’t yet a bike advocacy group in your area, consider starting one. Contact us at the Alliance for Biking & Walking for tips and coaching.

9036988964_e9d2289ae1_b

If you’re not involved in a local advocacy organization, consider joining one to help improve cycling infrastructure in your city

4. What are you doing to get more people on bikes?

The Alliance is uniting, supporting, and funding the people who teach local biking classes, start Safe Routes to School programs, make bike maps, lobby your government to make biking better, and tons of other pro-bike stuff.

9970362505_d4910abd3e_b

Networks of “green lanes” are a major project for the Alliance for Biking and Walking

5. How can your message resonate with non-bike riders?

More and more people are recognizing that better biking isn’t just about better biking – it’s also about building the types of places where people want to live and work and shop.

 

National Bike Month: Meet the League of American Bicyclists

May is National Bike Month, a celebration of all things cycling, so it seemed like the perfect time to chat with our great cycling advocacy partners who work hard to make riding bikes better. Every week this month we will introduce you to a different group that is making a difference here in the US. First up is Andy Clarke, President of the League of American Bicyclists.

League of American Bicyclists Logo

What’s the goal of your organization?

The mission of the League is to lead the movement to create a Bicycle Friendly America for everyone. We believe that bicycling brings people together, and that as more people ride life is better for everyone; communities are safer, stronger and better connected; and our nation is healthier, economically stronger, environmentally cleaner and more energy independent. We want everyone to enjoy the benefits and opportunities of bicycling. I’ve been with the organization for more than ten years, and I feel like our mission is more relevant and valuable now than ever. ( I can’t speak for the entire time since we were founded in 1880!)

League of American Bicyclists in DC

Advocating for cycling on the steps of the US Capitol

What projects are you working on currently?

Today, we aim to achieve those goals through advocacy, education, and promotion. We have a national advocacy presence in Washington DC where we work with Congress and the Federal agencies to ensure funding, policies and programs are in place to build a more bicycle-friendly America. We run the Bicycle Friendly Community (and Business, University and States) program that recognizes cities for their work but more importantly provides a roadmap or blueprint for becoming much more bike-friendly. On the education side, we run the only national certification program (with curricula and materials) for bike education experts — we currently have around 2,000 active League Cycling Instructors sharing their passion and knowledge for safe cycling with anyone that will listen!

National Bike Challenge

Events like National Bike Month, Bike to Work Day, and the National Bike Challenge fall into the promotion category along with the extraordinary volume and variety of rides that our 900+ affiliated local clubs and advocacy groups put on year-round. The National Bike Challenge has to be the most inspiring way of getting more people riding. Every year we are blown away by the stories of lives transformed by participation in the Challenge. We love it and hope you are signed up and part of the Challenge. And as if that weren’t enough, we are also actively engaged in promoting greater participation by women in bicycling, the bike movement, and the bike industry.

May is Bike Month

What actions can I take locally to make the experience of cycling better in my community?

In each of those areas, there are ways for individual cyclists and local organizations to plug in and take action. You can sign up for action alerts — both national and local “calls to action” when we need the voice of cyclists to be heard — or attend the National Bike Summit each March to be part of the advocacy team. We have scorecards you can use to do a quick analysis of your community or business to determine how bike-friendly they are; every BFC  and BFB application generates specific feedback — we encourage you to join your local advocacy group to get plugged in there. If you can’t stop talking about bikes and bike riding and safety…maybe you need to share that passion with others by becoming an instructor. If you aren’t quite ready for that, the classes those LCIs teach are full of great advice whatever your level of experience.

Having said all that, there are TWO really simple things you can do to make your community more bike friendly. Number one: ride your bike. Number two, write to your Mayor, County Executive or Council member and tell them you care about bicycling and want bicycling to be better. Throw in a couple of specific examples of improvements, and you are on the way!

6 Ways To Recycle Your Cycling Gear

We all know that cycling is good for the environment, but we still end up with old, worn-out cycling gear that is destined for the dumpster. We’ve discovered 6 ways to recycle your old cycling gear – and change it from trash to treasure.

1. Recycling tubes or tires

Tires and tubes are the one part on the bike that you can go through at a rapid rate. Since they are rubber based, recycling is a great option. At every Performance Bicycle location, we have a blue recycling bin where we accept tires and tubes for recycling. We share all of that rubber with Liberty Tire and they use it to make everything from Olympic weights to playground mulch. All you have to do is drop off your used tubes or worn out tires and we’ll do the rest.

recycle_fixture

Tube & tire recycling fixture at your local Performance Bicycle

If you don’t live near a Performance location, check with your local auto tire shop. They will often send piles of auto tires in to places like Liberty Tire and may take your bicycle tires and tubes for free. Be considerate though as they often have to pay to have their tires recycled, so asking them to do something for free that they have to pay for is asking them for a real favor.

One more option would be to box up and mail your tires/tubes to someone like Alchemy Goods. Alchemy recycles tires and tubes, turning them into everything from messenger bags and saddle bags to wallets and belts.

2. Passing on the love

The number one way this sport grows is through the generosity of others. We were all new to the sport at one point. Someone showed us how to use clipless pedals, when to signal, how to take over a lane to make a left turn, how to ride in a pace-line, or how to jump over a log. The best thing you can do for the sport of cycling is to take someone under your wing. For example, if you just bought pedals, why not your old pair on to someone who might get into the sport because of your generosity? So, be a cycling advocate and lend a hand to someone in need.

3. Making art

This one’s not for everyone. Some people just don’t have an eye for it. Still, if you’re artistically minded and have used bike parts lying around, why not combine your passion for cycling with your talent for art? We’ve seen some great examples of Christmas ornaments made out of bicycle chains, picture frames made from old bike parts, bracelets make from old spokes, or wind chimes made out of used chainrings. You don’t have to be a top etsy seller to make your mom a special hand-made birthday gift. Just think of the money you save and can justify putting towards new cycling parts!

4. Building bikes for those in need

Most large communities have bicycle co-ops. A bicycle co-op is an organization that recycles old bicycle parts and uses volunteer labor to build bicycles for people in need, often children. Many times they will have a program in place whereby a person in need can volunteer their time and earn themselves a bicycle. Volunteering for a program like this will give you another opportunity to give back to the cycling community and will also present many chances for donating some of your used bike parts. What seems like a worn out crankset to you, could be the missing piece necessary to helping someone without means to build a bike that they can use to get to work.

These organizations are everywhere. Ask your local shop if you can’t find one. Maybe your community needs one and you can start one yourself!

5. Metal Recycling

The one other part on your bicycle that you should be replacing with some regularity is your chain. At your nearest Performance Bicycle location, we also accept worn out chains, which we ship to Resource Revival. Resource Revival uses the chains to make all sorts of creative products from bottle openers to award medals. Even if you’re not near a Performance retail location, you can still utilize Resource Revival by collecting and mailing chains yourself or helping your local shop collect them. Instructions can be found on the Resource Revival website.

If this isn’t a feasible opportunity or if you have more metal than you know what to do with, you might try searching for a local metal recycler. They will often have someone who will pick up piles of old metal from you (frames, wheelsets, etc.) and will haul them off for free.

6. Energy Bar Wrapper Brigade

Our good friends at Clif Bar have partnered with Terracycle to provide an amazing opportunity to recycle used energy bar wrappers. Depending on your rate of consumption, it may take a while before you have enough wrappers saved up, but what about setting up a box in your office? How about bringing a box out to the local group ride and encouraging your friends to save their wrappers for your recycling project. Recycling wrappers can earn you prizes or further charitable causes through Terracycle. Check out the Energy Bar Wrapper Brigade website for more info.

Do you have any other great recycling ideas? Did we miss any of the big ones? Have creative art projects? Share them in the comments section below and let the recycling begin!

Wordless Wednesday

bike_corral

Wheels 4 Life – A Hans & Carmen Rey Charity + Performance Bicycle

wheels_4_life_new_logoWe’ve partnered with the Wheels 4 Life charity of mountain bike legend Hans Rey and his wife Carmen for a few years now, and we’re excited to be able to share some of the results. Wheels 4 Life is a non-profit charity that provides free bicycles for people in need of transportation in developing countries. They partner with local individuals, organizations and other groups to help identify persons who sincerely need a bike to be able to go to school or to work. Find out more about upcoming projects and how you can help on http://www.wheels4life.org/ – but we’ll let Hans himself tell you why this work is so important, in this video from Interbike last year:

Our main avenue of supporting the mission of  Wheels 4 Life is by the Wheels 4 Life branded GT bikes that we offer on our site & in our stores. A portion of the cost of each bike goes directly to Wheels 4 Life and helps fund their many projects around the globe – so far over 170 bikes have been purchased in Africa with these funds, bicycles that will make a difference for entire families and communities in real and lasting ways.

GT Wheels 4 Life Peace Tour Commuter Bike

GT Wheels 4 Life Peace Tour Commuter Bike

We’ll let Carmen Rey tell you more about the projects that were funded by our Wheels 4 Life branded GT bikes, and how they are making a difference already:

The amount raised through the Wheels 4 Life bicycles sold by Performance enabled us to purchase 170 bicycles for people in really great need of transportation in Uganda. We funded 3 different projects thanks to you and your support of the work we are doing.

The first was implemented in February 2012. This was the Kyatiri Health Centre Project and saw us donate 25 bicycles to the health care center. They then went on to distribute them to their patients so that they would be able to travel to the health clinic faster and easier. These patients live in remote areas and have to travel quite a distance in order to see a nurse who can administer their treatments.

Our Wheels 4 Life Ugandan Ambassador, Mr. Jude Muleke, has managed the second project. He heads a registered CBO known as CBIRD for short. Jude has received funding for bicycles from us several times in the past and also assists us with the running of our various projects in Uganda.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The third and final project was with Voluntary Effort for Community Health (VECH Uganda). This is the first time that we have worked with VECH and we have been pleased with the way that they have administered their Wheels 4 Life project. With both CBIRD and VECH the bicycles went to various groups in our target area: school children, farmers, and people in need of transportation in order to work.

We always purchase the bicycles used in our projects in the area where they will be distributed, in order to aid the local economy, to save on transportation costs, and to make sure that spare parts are easily available.

Thank you so much for changing so many lives through the gift of bicycles. One bike helps change the life of approximately 4 people’s lives – not just the one person who originally receives the bike, but also their neighbors and family with whom the bike is shared.

wheels4life_trip_3

Wheels 4 Life bikes ready to be donated on a recent trip to Africa

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 163 other followers

%d bloggers like this: