Going The Distance: A Guide To Long Distance Cycling

Riding a century is one of the most challenging, and rewarding, things a cyclist can do

Riding a century is one of the most challenging, and rewarding, things a cyclist can do

 

Long distance cycling is some of the most challenging, and rewarding, riding that a cyclist can do. Nothing compares to the feeling of satisfaction of setting yourself a goal that seems difficult—if not impossible—and reaching it, exhausted, tired, but full of pride.

Everyone’s definition of what a long ride is will be different, but for the sake of making this easy, we’ll say a long ride is 100 miles, a type of ride also called a century. It sounds daunting—and it is, but there are few things as defining and rewarding for a cyclist as riding your first century.

But before you start thinking “how hard can it be?”, and go off to jump on your bicycles, bear in mind that long distance cycling puts unique demands on your body, and it’s something you need to work up to and prepare for.

 

So here are some tips for that first big ride—whether it’s the first century you’ve ever done, or if you’re just putting in some base miles for the season ahead.

 

1. Work Up To It

First things first, you need to make sure you’re in shape to ride this kind of distance. Just hopping on your bike and trying to set out to ride 100 miles without any preparation is not a smart thing to do. Set a date on the calendar at least 6-8 weeks in advance (if you’re doing an organized ride, then you’ve already got a timeframe to shoot for), and do multiple weekly rides, trying to increase your mileage by 10-20% every week (depending on your fitness level).

 

2. Plan Your Route

You should have a definite route set before you head out the door. Even if you have a GPS or a smartphone, make sure you bring a cue sheet so you can always find your way back. Also ensure that your route will include plenty of places to stop and top up on water, pick up some food, use the bathroom, and just get off the bike for a few minutes. Ideally, your route should include a rest stop every 20 miles.

If you’re a little uneasy about getting stranded in the middle of nowhere if you bonk or have a mechanical issue, try finding a 20-30 mile loop near your home that you can ride repeatedly. This way if something goes wrong you can always make sure you can get home.

Lastly, plan a “B” route that will get you home faster in case of a mechanical problem, bad weather, or an emergency.

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A GPS computer like this Garmin 810 can help you stay on your route

 

3A. Have The Right Gear

Depending on your speed, riding 100 miles means you can be on the bike anywhere form 4-8 hours. That’s a lot of time for the weather to change or something to go wrong. Always make sure you have the follow with you when you set out on a long ride:

Remember though that tools are useless if you don’t know how to use them. Before you set out, make sure you know how to repair a flat tire, fix a broken derailleur, or adjust loose brakes. To learn more about basic bike maintenance, check out the How To page on our Learning Center.

Commuter Kit (carried in messenger bag): Tire lever, multitool, patch kit, spare tube, pump

A comprehensive tool kit, like this one, can save you some trouble down the road

3B. Pick The Right Clothes

This also isn’t the ride to wear your “B” gear. Wearing the shorts with the ok-but-not-great-pad, a pair of ill-fitting shoes, or a jersey that is either too thin or too warm will have you hating life somewhere around mile 55, if not sooner. For your big ride, break out your best shorts, favorite jersey and make sure your shoes fit properly. You’ll thank yourself later.

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Choosing the right clothes, like the Performance Ultra shorts and jersey, can help make the miles a little more comfortable

 

4. Fuel Up

Inadequate fueling is the biggest reason most failed attempts at a century ride don’t succeed. You need to start eating before you even leave the house, with a good breakfast that includes plenty of carbs and protein. The second you get on the bike and start riding, start eating. Gels and chews are essentials to bring, since they pack plenty of energy in a small package. But you also want to avoid having a belly full of nothing but sugar, so ensure you’re eating real food too, like bananas, peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, crackers, and other high-energy, easy to digest foods.

You also need to make sure that you are drinking. Drink one bottle of plain water the first hour, then a bottle of hydration mix the second hour. Keep alternating water and hydration mix every other hour.

If you find yourself cramping, that’s usually your body’s way of telling you you need more salt, so make sure you pack some chews (Clif Shot Bloks margarita flavor is a delicious choice) or other snack with plenty of sodium.

And the biggest thing to remember: bring twice as much food as you think you’ll need.

For more tips on cycling nutrition, check out our guide.

Picking the right nutrition items, like these salt-filled energy chews, will help keep you fueled up and avoid cramping

 

5. Sit Up and Stand Up

Most professional riders can spend 6-7 hours on the bike no problem, but they’re getting paid to suffer like that. When riding a century, make sure you take plenty of stops to stand up, get off the bike, walk around a bit, and stretch. This will help restore blood flow, stop muscles from cramping, and help you feel better during the day.

You also don’t have to hammer all day. Riding a century is more about your ability to endure than to go fast. Take it easy, spin in an easier gear than normal, and really take the time to enjoy the sights you’re riding by.

Check out this article to learn more about preventing fatigue.

 

6. Mentally Prepare

There’s no two ways about it, no matter how fit you are, riding 100 miles is tough. You need to mentally prepare yourself for the inevitable aches, pains, and defeatist thoughts that are going to come to you. Things are going to get sore, weird muscles are going to cramp up, you’ll be riding into a bad headwind at some point, and you’ll probably reach some dark places where you think you can’t do this. You may even get chased by a dog or two.

Just remember that this happens to everyone, and our minds and bodies are much more resilient that we give them credit for. Riding through those aches and pains and low moments are part of what makes riding long distances so rewarding—overcoming our own perceived limitations and doing things we thought were impossible.

 

7. Don’t Go It Alone

What’s harder than a century? A solo century. Being alone with your thoughts for 100 miles can undo even the hardest of cyclists. If you have other friends who ride, see if anyone is up to going for the 100 with you. Not only will it be fun to get out and train together, but doing a long distance ride is much easier when you have someone else with you. You can talk to each other to take your mind off the miles, help keep each other motivated, and draft off of each other if the wind picks up. Plus, in case of an emergency you’ll have someone around who can get help if needed.

 

Riding with a friend is a good way to help the miles go by a little easier

Riding with a friend is a good way to help the miles go by a little easier

 

Have you done any long rides lately, or do you have any planned? Do you have any tips or tricks that we missed? Let us know in the comments section.

3 Tips For Getting A Friend Into Cycling

 

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We all know how awesome it is to be a cyclist—but sometimes it’s nice to share the love. Many cyclists have tried valiantly over the last century or so to turn their friends and loved ones into members of our community, with varying degrees of success. It can be done, but it needs to be done with care—push it too hard, and it could backfire.

Here are a few simple tips to help get your loved one into the 2-wheeled lifestyle.

 

1. Keep It Accessible

There’s nothing cyclists love more than geeking out about gear and numbers—but you want to avoid making things sound harder or more complicated than they really are. Keep it simple, easy, and accessible.

Here are some common errors to avoid:

  • Resist the temptation to go all-out with gear, and focus more on what they want instead of what you think they need. Example: if they don’t feel comfortable in lycra cycling wear, try turning them onto more relaxed gear like apparel from Club Ride or Performance.
  • Don’t push them into getting a super aggressive or racy bike (at least not at first). The bike they pick should be one they like and feel comfortable on.
  • Don’t push the use of clipless pedals, aerobars, or other things like that at first. Wait until they get more confidence on the bike.

As they get more into it, hopefully all that stuff will come with time. But to start, just keep things simple. Here are a few additional tips, from our Learning Center.

 

Casual cycling apparel offers many of the performance benefits of lycra gear for the beginning cyclist

 

2. Make It Fun

Don’t just get them hooked up with a bike and a helmet, and expect them to go out and ride. When you’re just getting into cycling, it helps to have someone who can encourage and guide you on your journey. Ride together and get out and have fun. But tread carefully here, my friend.

If you try and drag your friend or significant other on long rides or push the pace too hard, you risk making them think cycling is too hard. You want cycling to be remembered as something fun and a respite from every day worries, not something that they had to suffer through.

Try picking short scenic routes or a bike path to start with, and ride at a pace where you can talk and hold a conversation. If you find yourself unconsciously pushing the pace harder, try riding in the little chainring, which will act as a hobble and prevent you from riding too fast.

 

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Remember to have fun out there. Organized events and fun rides, like charity rides or fund raisers, are a great way to introduce new riders to the sport.

 

3. Prioritize Safety

Even if you get everything else right, it will all be for naught if your your new cycling buddy doesn’t feel safe on the bike. And feeling safe on the bike is very important. While most experienced riders have the bike handling skills and experience to ride in traffic with cars zooming by, it can be a scary experience for newer cyclists. To start, pick routes with little traffic and lower speed limits, or head for the bike path. Also try riding during off-peak hours, so there will be less traffic. And remember, if they express any concerns or fears, don’t scoff or dismiss them as unfounded. Try and accommodate their concerns as much as possible, so they’ll have the confidence to go riding again.

For more information, check out our article about riding defensively.

Riding on a bike path or low-traffic street is a good way to help beginner cyclists feel safe

Riding on a bike path or low-traffic street is a good way to help beginner cyclists feel safe

 

Did we miss anything? If you have any tips for helping someone get into riding, feel free to share in the comments section.

Fat Bikes, Gravel Bikes and More from the North American Handmade Bicycle Show 2014

Since the 2014 edition of the North American Handmade Bicycle Show was right down the road from our home office, as it was held only a few hours away in Charlotte, NC, we couldn’t miss out on the chance to see what this creative array of small and custom bike builders have been dreaming up. While many of their designs aren’t for everyone, that’s precisely the point! Having a small and nimble design and build team (of sometimes just one person) means that they can cater to niche markets and often anticipate new trends in the cycling industry.

So what did we notice while we perused the convention hall – well, quite a bit of creativity! But one of the big trends (pardon the pun) was the growing number of fat bikes on display, in a wide array of sizes, colors, suspension and utility:

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Gravel bikes were also on display from many builders, again in a variety of shapes and sizes. The line gets kind of fuzzy between gravel and cyclocross bikes, but the idea for a gravel bike is one that you can ride any where – on road, off road, and everything in between. Wide tires, lots of clearance, and disc brakes were common factors on these do-anything “road” bikes.

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But a lot of the fun of the Handmade Bicycle Show is just taking a look at the creative and sometimes wacky designs on display – all a direct reflection of the builder and the person that the bike was designed for.

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And finally, while we didn’t catch them all, we also loved checking out the headbadges that each bike builder used on their bikes – one last bit of personality to finish off a frame!

Diamondback Podium Optum Pro Cycling Team Edition Road Bike

Painted in team livery colors, hung with SRAM Red 22 and rolling on HED wheels, this is one serious machine

Painted in team livery colors, hung with SRAM Red 22 and rolling on HED wheels, this is one serious machine

It’s not often that most of us get to ride the exact same machines that the pro’s do. While we can buy team replica frames, most often they don’t come with the same parts that the pro’s actually ride. Sure you may end up with a bike that may have the same color scheme, and some of the components may look almost right, but when you see a close-up of the pro’s equipment you realize that what you ended up with is indeed just a replica. It’s not the same race-ready gear that is built to hold up to the rigors of the upper echelon of pro cycling.

But Diamondback set out to change all of that in 2014 when they announced that the Optum Pro Cycling presented by Kelly Benefit Strategies team was going to ride Diamondback Podium bikes. The Podium is one of the finest bikes we’ve ever had the opportunity to ride. Stiff, fast, responsive, and drop-dead gorgeous, these are bikes that can help Optum, and you, take the win. And this is no “team replica” bike either. The light Continuous Fiber Technology frameset is painted up in team livery colors, hung with pro-level SRAM Red 22 components, and rolling on stiff HED carbon tubulars – in short it’s the exact same bike the Optum pro’s will be riding in the Tour of California and other top races in North America and Europe. And the best news is, it’s now available at Performance Bicycle.

To see more, check out the gallery below.

Custom Cycling Clothing from Champion System and Performance Bicycle

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We are happy to announce that we have partnered with Champion System, a worldwide leader in custom technical apparel, to offer custom cycling clothing through PerformanceBike.com. Our partnership with Champion System allows us to offer high quality, great looking cycling clothing for your team or club, or even for individuals who want their own unique kits. Basically, if you can dream it up, Champion System can make it happen!

The custom clothing option is available on PerformanceBike.com and Champion System will facilitate the process, from design through delivery. Champion System offers cycling and triathlon custom apparel, as well as a full line up of casual technical apparel and accessories. All items are available through our custom order page on PerformanceBike.com.

*Please note – custom clothing orders do not qualify for Team Performance points and all returns must be handled through Champion System directly.

Customization

Start with a blank canvas and customization options are endless – from colors to styles to design.

Later this month we will be hosting a “Design a Jersey Contest” where we will showcase the possibilities of Champion System custom clothing on PerformanceBike.com. The public will vote for a winner from the top designs – the winner will then receive a copy of their jersey design to ride in and see their winning design offered as a Limited Edition Performance Bicycle Summer Jersey available at PerformanceBike.com. We’ll post more details of this contest soon – but start sketching out your jersey designs now!

Up Close With The Pro’s: Diamondback and Optum Pro Cycling

Optum Pro Cycling Training Camp, Feb. 2014

If you haven’t heard yet, one of America’s top pro teams has recently made the switch to Diamondback bikes for this upcoming season. The Optum Pro Cycling Presented by Kelly Benefit Strategies men’s and women’s team will be riding Diamondback’s amazing, and much lauded, Podium series bikes during the 2014 season. You’ll be able to spot these bikes everywhere from the Tour of California to the U.S. Pro Challenge.

Diamondback visited the Optum men's and women's team training camps in California

Diamondback visited the Optum men’s and women’s team training camps in California

To get a more in-depth look at what’s going on with the team, Diamondback took a trip to their training camp in Oxnard California.

Check out some photos here.

U.S. Women's National Champion Jade Wilcoxson was riding well at training camp

U.S. Women’s National Champion Jade Wilcoxson was riding well at training camp

While there, they caught up with U.S. Women’s National Champion Jade Wilcoxson and got to ask her a few questions.

Click here to read the article.

The team mechanics have their work cut out for them to prepare all of the team bikes for the season

The team mechanics have their work cut out for them preparing the team bikes for the season

They also took an opportunity to visit with the team mechanics and get the scoop on the new Diamondback bikes.

Click here to see what they had to say.

Meatball doesn't like being called Meatball. Can you think of a better nickname?

Can you think of a new nickname for this guy? Also, those socks are amazing.

And, of course, they got up close and personal with the delightful Mike “Meatball” Friedman. Apparently, he doesn’t like the nickname “Meatball” though.

So it’s time for a contest: Suggest a new nickname for Mike, and we’ll select the best one to receive a $50 gift card – just post your suggestion in a comment below by the end of the day on Friday 3/7/14.

To read the interview with Mike, click here.

The Diamondback Podium Optum Team Bike is now available from Performance Bicycle

And, of course, you can check out the whole line of Diamondback road bikes, including the new Optum Pro Team edition Diamondback Podium, at Performancebike.com.

Ridden and Reviewed: Charge Cooker Maxi Fat Bike

I’m not much of a mountain biker. Mostly, I get my kicks—such as they are—on the road. I dabble every now and again, but nothing serious. That is until the dreaded Polar Vortex (I, II, or III– I can’t remember which now) pummeled our North Carolina office with a couple of inches (gasp!) of snow, taking road cycling off the table. I was getting all ready to not ride a bike at all and go lift, when instead I was given a chance to test ride the Charge Cooker Maxi fat bike on a snowy trail ride. I scrounged around for some ill-fitting clothing, geared up and headed out. I admit I looked at the bike dubiously, but within minutes of getting on, I was sold.

Snow biking puts a new spin on old trails, and is a great way to spice up your riding routine.

Big fat bike, big fat fun.

About The Bike: The Charge Cooker Maxi is a fat bike with a steel frame and fork. The bike is designed to accommodate massive, 26X4” tires that mount on 26” x 80mm wide Wienmann rims. This gives you the feel of riding a full suspension bike without all the mechanical moving parts. The bike is a beast that can pretty much roll over anything, and is great for snow, sand, loose dirt, or just generally finding your inner-gnar on the trail. It’s equipped with a SRAM X5 2×10 drivetrain (with an FSA Comet crank).

Rear brake arch has plenty of clearance

Rear brake arch has plenty of clearance, and rack braze-ons make it ideal for bike camping or other off-road touring

Unboxing and Set Up: My Charge Cooker Maxi was already set up as a demo bike, but it should be generally straight forward, since it’s basically a conventional full-rigid mountain bike (with massive tires), so you don’t have to worry about setting suspension sag or fork rebound. The only thing to be aware of is pumping up the tires— they’re so big that even getting to the ultra-low volume of 8-10 PSI can take you several minutes.

I added a set of Forte Platform pedals, bringing the weight to about: 36.6 lbs.

The Ride:  Taking the bike out on the trails in the snow was just pure fun. At first I was a little nervous riding the bike over the snow and compacted ice, but all my worry turned out to be for naught. The bike handled the snow, ice, and buried trail hazards with ease. The feel of the bike is less like riding a mountain bike and more like driving an Abrams tank, sans cannon. It didn’t so much roll over the snow as churn through it, and I rarely felt like I lost traction (actually, the only time I did was when I tried to take an icy corner too tight). I truly felt like I could roll over just about anything—which proved to be the case. Because the tires are so huge, and have such a low volume, the bike can handle rough trail like a full suspension bike—making tackling rocks, logs and trail bumps feel easy and comfortable, but the full rigid frame and fork gave a feel of pedaling efficiency you sometimes don’t get from a full-squish bike.

The bike just kind of rolls over anything

The bike just kind of rolls over anything

The bike isn’t the lightest thing in the world, particularly if you’re used to a featherweight XC rig, but to lament it’s weight is to kind of miss the point. The fat bike isn’t about winning races, it’s about going anywhere you’ve ever wanted to go on a bike. Even with all that heft, it’s still maneuverable and light enough that I was able to chase down some of that ever-elusive Fat Bike Air at one point. Handling was pretty easy, and didn’t feel nearly as sluggish as I had expected. The bike easily got up to speed, and carried momentum nicely into turns. The mechanical disc brakes provide great all-weather stopping power that easily scrubbed speed and provided well-modulated stopping power when I needed it.

The gearing on the bike is also nice and low, so you can spin at a high cadence, but still generate plenty of torque and power to tackle almost anything in your path. One small niggle I did have was fit. Because of the geometry modifications that had to be made to the chainstays to accommodate the massive rear tire, I found the q-factor on the cranks to be a little too wide for me, however that was fixed by simply switching from clipless pedals to a pair of platforms. This actually turned out to be preferable anyway, since I was able to wear hiking boots instead which were A) warmer, and B) easier to get off the bike and go check out stuff off the trail.

Tackling the snow and ice was easy-- and a blast

Tackling the snow and ice was easy– and a blast

The bike also incorporates rack mounts, which make it almost ideal for bikepacking or really getting out and exploring the back country. With no suspension to worry about, the Cooker Maxi would be a nice and dependable rig for some serious trail trips. I love touring and s24o (sub-24 hour overnight) bike camping, so I’m pretty excited about the possibilities of taking the fat bike out and exploring the mountains of western North Carolina this summer.

The Verdict

If you’re looking for a fun, versatile, go-anywhere bike, the Charge Cooker Maxi is definitely for you. No matter what conditions or terrain, I have no doubts that this bike could handle them with ease. The Cooker Maxi takes the best aspects of a full-suspension and a hardtail and mixes them together—but with more utility. If you’re not worried about racing, but just want a pure adventure machine then this is the bike for you.

The adventures on this bike have just begun

The adventures on this bike have just begun

71 Reasons We Love Cycling

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It’s Valentine’s Day, which means we want to give a special shout-out to our sweethearts, waiting at home for us to take them out for a nice evening. We’re speaking, of course, about our bicycles.

Whether you’re young or old, a seasoned vet or shopping around for your first bike, you’ll agree that there’s a million reason to love cycling, but we probably can’t think of them all ourselves. So help us out, what do you love about riding?

Here were our Top 71 Reasons To Love Cycling

  1. Unwinding from a long day
  2. Spending time outside
  3. Nothing makes you tougher than riding in bad weather
  4. It makes your legs look ripped
  5. Going farther than you thought possible with your own power
  6. Getting to tell other people “I rode here”
  7. Earning the descent by climbing up first
  8. The first day of the year when you don’t need arm or knee warmers
  9. Those conversations you can only have during a long ride
  10. Feeling dog tired and completely happy
  11. Achieving personal bests on long climbs
  12. Post-ride beers
  13. Trying to turn your significant other into a cyclist (your results may vary)
  14. New Bike Day
  15. The feeling of triumph when you fix your first flat
  16. Those days when you get on the bike and just feel strong
  17. The taste of a fizzy, sugary drink at the finish line
  18. Long, lazy evening rides
  19. Battling the elements
  20. Knowing, in your head, you are a 5-time Paris-Roubaix winner
  21. Having a whole other set of clothes just for cycling
  22. The sound of cycling cleats on coffee shop floors
  23. Passing all the cars stuck in traffic on your way to work
  24. Falling in the rock garden, then going back and nailing it
  25. Letting yourself get lost, and discovering a new route you never knew existed
  26. The feeling of freshly shaved legs
  27. Pre-race jitters
  28. The Zen of Bike Washing
  29. Discovering a new favorite gel flavor (here’s to you chocolate ClifShot)
  30. Riding with no hands
  31. That feeling of flying when you hit the right line on a descent
  32. Unzipping your jersey on a climb
  33. Picking out your favorite bottles
  34. Meticulously unpacking and repacking your hydration pack
  35. Driving home with a muddy mountain bike
  36. The first time you perfectly wrap your handlebars
  37. Learning to unclip without tipping over
  38. Charity rides: doing something you love for a good cause
  39. Secretly watching Le Tour on your computer at work, then minimizing it real fast when your boss comes to your cube
  40. Coffee
  41. Having a shed full of tools Bob Vila doesn’t know about
  42. Seeing things you’d never notice in a car
  43. Sunsets
  44. The agony and the ecstasy
  45. Managing to put on your rain jacket without stopping
  46. Sitting on the top tube at a traffic light
  47. Railing the berm
  48. Vowing to race ‘cross next year
  49. Telling everyone who will listen that you could have gone pro if you’d started earlier
  50. Ride mileage that gets longer with every retelling
  51. Having a rapport with your mechanic
  52. Checking the weekend weather forecast on multiple apps
  53. Driving to the ride
  54. Riding to the ride
  55. Post-ride meals that taste like manna from heaven
  56. Because some of my best thoughts have come while riding a bike
  57. The open road or the perfect trail
  58. Freedom
  59. Meeting new friends
  60. Spending time alone
  61. Learning how to fix it yourself
  62. Sharing tips with a new cyclist
  63. Talking about the ride after the ride
  64. Wearing spandex in public
  65. Losing weight
  66. Getting up before dawn to go for a ride
  67. Chasing the sunset on your bike
  68. Spring Classics
  69. Watching the Tour
  70. Zero emissions
  71. No gas, no parking fees, no insurance

And, of course, to find that perfect Valentine’s Day gift for the cyclist in your life (or your bike), you’ll find everything you need at Performancebike.com, or your nearest Performance Bicycle store.

9 Questions with Cyclocross Pro Jonathan Page

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Fuji Altamira CX 1.0 Cyclocross Bike that Jonathan Page rode in 2013

Fuji Bikes is proud to sponsor 4-time U.S. National Cyclocross Champion Jonathan Page, so we got in touch for a few quick questions before he represents the United States once again at the UCI Cyclo-cross World Championships in Hoogerheide, the Netherlands. Jonathan Page has had an illustrious ‘cross racing career, including a 2007 CX Worlds silver medal, in addition to his 4 U.S. titles and numerous top placings in Europe – last year he raced on the Altamira CX 1.0 cyclocross bike, and this year he’s upgraded to the top end 1.1 model. The 37-year-old is based in Belgium – he’s the only American man to race full time in the rough and tumble of European cyclocross, battling for respect every week. He writes a great blog on CyclingNews that details his ongoing adventures, but read on below for 9 quick questions from this American cyclocross superstar:

How did you get started racing cyclocross?

I started racing because my best friend growing up raced ‘cross.

Jonathan_Page_6Why do you race cyclocross in Europe full time?

I wanted to race against the best in the world, so I came to Belgium.

Photo by Martin Steele, Endura Ltd

Photo by Martin Steele, Endura Ltd

What’s the best part and the hardest part of being a pro cyclist?

Best part is getting to be outside. Worst part is that it is 24 hours a day.

Jonathan_Page_5What was your favorite or best race this season and why?

Bredene, because I was able to battle for 6th place even with broken ribs.

Jonathan_Page_8Who’s the most important person on your race support team?

Everyone on my support team is really important to me. Without my family, friend and mechanic Franky, sponsors, and supporters, I wouldn’t be doing this.

Jonathan_Page_3Does your family travel with you during the season?

This year, much less than I would have liked. But they are with me now, on my way to the Nommay World Cup in France, so that’s great!

Jonathan_Page_4What’s the biggest mistake that you see amateur cyclists make when they train and what’s your best advice for them?

I don’t think there is a cover-all answer for the mistake part of this question. My best advice is just to have fun!

Photo by Martin Steele, Endura Ltd

Photo by Martin Steele, Endura Ltd

If you could ride your bike anywhere in the world, where would you go?

Right now, anywhere sunny would be great, as it hasn’t stopped raining since I got back from the USA. But I think my favorite place to ride is in the Swiss Alps, with cows bells ringing all around me.

Jonathan_Page_9What do you have in your pocket when you go for a training ride?

I keep it simple – only my phone and a Clif Mojo Bar or 2.

Check out this video from Global Cycling Network for an in-depth look at Jonathan’s Fuji Altamira CX cyclocross race bike.

All photos © Wil Matthews (unless otherwise noted)

Quick Guide To Winter Jackets

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Just because it’s dark and cold out doesn’t mean you can’t get out and ride. After all, as Eddy Merckx, every single magazine, and everyone on Facebook says: “there’s no bad weather, just bad clothing”. With the right outerwear on (and the right equipment and preparations), you can ride comfortably in just about any conditions.

We’ve done some rough guides to dressing for the weather before, but folks keep asking us for specific jacket recommendations. So we pulled out some of our favorites to highlight here for you today. These are all jackets we regularly ride at lunch, after work, and on the weekends.

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MEN’S

Castelli Mortirolo Due Jacket:

This is a heavier-weight, Wind Stopper soft shell jacket from Castelli. It has a smaller cut and a race fit, so we’d definitely recommend buying a size up… especially if you plan on layer up with it. Paired with a long sleeve base layer (or two if it’s really cold), this jacket can help you tackle even the worst weather.

For the WOMEN’S version, click here.

Craft Elite Bike Pace Jacket:

The Craft Elite Bike Pace is another soft shell jacket that does an amazing job of holding in heat without over heating the rider. With a soft, breathable exterior, wind-resistant panels, and an innovative brushed fleece interior featuring ThermoCool technology to help regulate body temperature, this is a great jacket for all day rides in cold conditions. Paired with a base layer and long sleeve jersey, this jacket will keep you comfy down to at least 8 degrees Fahrenheit. Trust us, we had the dubious pleasure of getting to test that out during the Coldest Day of the Year Ride (for North Carolina).

Sugoi Icon Rain Jacket:

The Sugoi Icon is more of a rain jacket than an insulating jacket, but if you live in New England or the Pacific Northwest, you’ll probably need one of these. The Icon is made from Polartec’s incredible new NeoShell material, which is the most breathable waterproof material on the market right now. That being said, you still might want to save this one for when you really need it, because it’ll still hold heat during climbing or hard efforts. But when the rain is coming down, it’s packed with innovative and useful features that’ll keep you dry and cozy while riding. We found this jacket to run a little bit on the larger side…but that should be fine if you’ll be layering under it.

For the WOMEN’S version, click here.

Here’s a cool video about Sugoi’s jacket technology:

Performance Transformer 2.0 Jacket:

This Performance Transformer 2.0 jacket is a great choice for milder days when you might only need a wind jacket. The Transformer 2.0 jacket is built with a wind-resistant material that helps keep you warm on blowy days, and removable sleeves to turn the jacket into a vest if the day really warms up. It’s not insulated, so if you’ll be wearing it when it’s really cold out, you’ll need to layer up underneath, but it’s definitely a great choice for most occasions. It has plenty of features that make it ideal for all-day riding.

Pearl Izumi Elite Barrier Convertible Jacket:

Like the Performance Transformer 2.0 jacket, this Pearl Izumi jacket is a wind layer, aimed at more mild days. Again, it’s not insulated, so in the winter its best used as part of a layering system, but it does a stellar job of cutting the wind. Thanks to removable sleeves, you basically get two garments in one that allows it to be worn most of the year. And, with its great use of color and graphics, this jacket stands apart from the crowd.

For the WOMEN’S version, click here.

WOMEN’S

Louis Garneau Enerblock Cycling Jacket

Being a Canadian brand, Louis Garneau understands the importance of staying warm on the bike better than most. That’s why the Louis Garneau Enerblock Cycling jacket is made form Garneau’s amazing Heatmaxx and Enerblock fabrics. Enerblock helps cut the wind chill, while Heatmaxx provides a brushed fleece interior that maximizes heat retention. Pair with a base layer on milder days, or add in a long sleeve jersey to take on even the coldest days. It’s also got some cool features you won’t find on most other cycling jackets, like hand warmer pockets and a zippered sleeve pocket for snacks or valuables.

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