Taking Care of Saddle Sores

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File under “I’m going to stand the whole ride because it hurts”

While they aren’t generally discussed in polite company, saddle sores are simply an uncomfortable fact of life for many cyclists. No matter what, almost every cyclist is guaranteed to have at least one in their lifetime. They’re painful, they’re uncomfortable, and they can be embarrassing.

But don’t worry—it doesn’t have to be all doom and gloom. Taking car of saddle sores is pretty easy. There are a few simple things you can do to prevent them from happening in the first place, or at least shorten the misery when you get them.

 What Are They

Saddle sores are localized skin infections in your, um…pelvic area. Think of them as a pimple that forms where the sun don’t shine. Most are very minor and will clear up on their own, but sometimes if you don’t take care of them, they can get a little out of hand.

Always remember: saddle sores are infections, and should be treated with respect. While extremely, extremely rare, saddle sores can develop into dangerous systemic infections.

If the sore is very painful, feels warm to the touch, is very red or you see red streaks coming from it, or you’re running a fever, seek immediate medical care.

You may also want to visit a doctor if the saddle sore hasn’t cleared in two weeks, or is getting larger.

 

What Causes Them

This is still debated, not just among cyclists, but also in the medical community. The general consensus seems to be though that saddle sores happen when friction irritates hair follicles, allowing them to become infected by bacteria.

 

Prevention

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. To prevent saddle sores from happening in the first place, follow these tips:

1. Proper bike fit

Having your saddle too high can cause you to rock from side to side on the saddle, building up friction along the perinea and where the thighs join to the buttocks.

2. Use The Right Saddle (for you)

Not all saddles suite all body types. Find the one that’s right for you—which could mean trying a few different models and brands. Also, if you’ll be riding more than a few miles, stay away from very padded saddles, add on gel cushions, etc… These only increase friction and make things worse. It seems counterintuitive, but trust us.

Finding the right saddle for you can take some trial and error

Finding the right saddle for you can take some trial and error

3. Wear Bike Shorts

Bike shorts come with a pad sewn into them to help keep you comfortable on minimally padded saddles. By moving the padding to the shorts instead of the saddle, the padding moves with your body, reducing friction and helping prevent saddle sores. Also, don’t wear underwear underneath them—that just defeats the purpose.

Using cycling shorts, like the new Ultra SL bibs, can make a world of difference

Using cycling shorts, like the new Ultra SL bibs, can make a world of difference

4. Use chamois cream

Chamois cream is an anti-chafing lotion that can be applied to the chamois pad itself, or directly to the skin. It helps form a protective barrier between you and the fabric to prevent chaffing and irritation.

Have a saddle sore? This is your new best friend

Have a saddle sore? This is your new best friend

5. Wash Your Shorts

Never wear dirty shorts. Not even the ones you “just wore for only 2 miles yesterday”. Last time you rode in them, you created a hot, moist environment loaded up with dead skin cells and sweat. They’re basically a petri dish for bacteria and fungi. Now you want to put those dirty shorts on and ride again? Sure…if you think that’s a good idea…

6. Change and Shower

As soon as you finish your ride, take your shorts off and bathe as quickly as possible. Even if that means wrapping a towel around yourself in the parking lot and changing out of your shorts, go for it. Using some shower wipes to clean up can make a big difference. The longer they stay on after the ride, the greater the chances of a saddle sore. And no matter how short your ride, try to grab a shower and wash up. Staying clean is key to prevention.

If it'll be a little while before you can shower after a ride, try cleaning up with shower wipes

If it’ll be a little while before you can shower after a ride, try cleaning up with shower wipes

 

Treatment

Already have a saddle sore? Don’t worry. It may be sore, it probably hurts to touch, and it makes riding uncomfortable. But there’s plenty you can do to help yourself get better.

1. Cleaning

By far the best thing you can do to help speed along recovery is keep the area clean. Wash 2-3 times a day with regular soap and warm water. Thoroughly dry the area.

2. Rest

Nobody likes taking time off the bike, but sometimes riding can make saddle sores worse. If the sore is so painful you can’t sit on the bike, you’re better off taking a few days to let things heal. Yes, we hear about the pro’s riding through them all the time. They are paid to do that and are looked after accordingly. You are not.

3. Ointment

If you catch a saddle sore early, you can usually treat them easily with over the counter ointments.

We’ve had extremely good luck with topical acne medications that contain Benzoyl Peroxide (like OTC Persa-Gel 10). BP is a drawing agent that helps the spot dry out and heal—often in just a day or two. It can be tough on the skin though, and everyone reacts to things differently, so we’d recommend testing it on a…ummm… less sensitive area of the body first. Always consult a doctor before trying new medications.

Lately the medical community has advised AGAINST using an antibiotic ointment for minor skin infections like saddle sores. Antibiotic resistance is a serious and growing problem, so if you think it’s bad enough to warrant antibiotics, then you probably need a trip to the doctor to have them check it out.

We've had excellent luck with products like this for the early treatment of sores

We’ve had excellent luck with products like this for the early treatment of sores

4. Chamois Cream

Our old friend is back again. Most chamois creams have mild antiseptic and moisturizing properties. If your saddle interface area is feeling a little irritated or chaffed after your ride, it can help to put a small amount of chamois cream on the affected area after you shower. This helps to soothe the skin, prevent infection, and speed the healing process.

5. Don’t Squeeze Them

Sorry if this provokes a gag reflex, but don’t try to “pop” a saddle sore. While they are similar to pimples, they aren’t exactly the same. Trying to squeeze it may only drive the infection into a deeper layer of tissue—then you’re really in trouble.

The Perfect Recovery Meal

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Recovery is arguably just as important as saddle time. No matter how hard you’re riding, if you aren’t giving your body what it needs to recover, you’re not going to get any faster.
Recovery consists of two key aspects: time and nutrition. Even if you’re taking regular days off, it doesn’t matter if you’re not refueling your body in that crucial 40 minute window after a ride. But sometimes after a few hard hours on the bike, it can be tough to scrape together a big meal that will give you all the key ingredients you need to help your body start repairing itself.

That’s why we’ve found it easier to drink our recovery meal than to eat it.

To make the Perfect Recovery Meal– one that tastes great and helps jumpstart the recovery process, all you need is a blender and some creativity. Here are some of our favorite recipes to spark your imagination.

1. The Recovery Cocoa

This is an excellent recovery drink to help revitalize you after those long, hard, cold winter rides.

Ingredients:

  1. 2 Scoops chocolate Clif Shot Protein Recovery Drink
  2. ½ packet (1 tbsp) hot chocolate mix
  3. Hot water

 

2. The Rejuvenator Smoothie

Use this refreshing smoothie to help recovery from hard rides on hot days. It has plenty of protein, phyto- and micronutrients, fat, and electrolytes. We would say it’s arguably the Perfect Recovery Meal.

Ingredients:

  1. 1 cup milk or milk substitute (almond, soy, or coconut)
  2. ½ scoop vanilla Osmo Nutrition Acute Recovery
  3. Splash coffee
  4. 1 Banana
  5. Handful fresh or frozen strawberries
  6. 1 big spoonful peanut butter
  7. Blend until smooth

 

3. The Green Monster

This is a great smoothie to have any time (sometimes we use this one as a meal replacement on off-days), but its really an excellent recovery meal after longer distance endurance rides.

Ingredients:

  1. 1 cup coconut water
  2. ½ scoop Skratch Labs Lemons hydration mix
  3. Handful baby spinach
  4. 1 banana
  5. 1 tsp matcha green tea powder
  6. ½ cup extra soft tofu
  7. Pinch of fresh or powdered ginger (natural anti-inflammatory)
  8. Blend until smooth

 

4. R4 Smoothie

Endurox R4 is an excellent recovery meal option on its own, but we like to enhance the benefits by adding a few extras. We’ve found this one to be best after those really tough, high intensity group rides or after an intervals day.

Ingredients:

  1. 1 serving vanilla Endurox All Natural R4 recovery drink mix
  2. 12 oz. water
  3. 1 banana
  4. 1 handful fresh or frozen blueberries
  5. 1 handful fresh or frozen strawberries
  6. 1/2 cup yogurt or soy yogurt
  7. Pinch of nutmeg (natural anti-inflammatory)
  8. Pinch of salt
  9. Blend until smooth

Getting The Most Out Of Short Rides

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January is upon us, which means it’s time to really start thinking about your riding. Whether you’re on the trainer, or braving the elements, odds are most of us aren’t getting in nearly as much saddle time as we’d like. That means we need to be smarter about how we use it. Just going out and turning the pedals for a bit won’t do you much good.

Whether you’re into racing or not, here are some workouts to help you get the most out of shorter rides.

 

1. HIIT Sessions

High Intensity Interval Sessions are all the rage right now, and for good reason. You can get a serious work out in just 15 minutes that can give you some big fitness gains.

You can do these either outside or on the trainer. Start with a 5 minute warm up, then alternate 30 seconds intervals at 90% max effort  with 1 minute recovery periods. Finish with a  3-5 minute cool down.

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Shop for trainers and rollers

 

2. Climbing Repeats

These are best done on the trainer, but you can do them outside either by finding a familiar hill, or trying to ride into a headwind if you live in a flatter area.

Start with a 3 minute warm up, then alternate 2 minute intervals with 2 minute recovery periods. With each interval, you should move into a progressively harder gear, pedaling at a lower cadence. Alternate between sitting and standing to develop all those climbing muscles.

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Learn more about Getting The Hang of Indoor Training

 

3. Slow and Steady

You’re remembering to push it hard, but are you remembering to go slowly, too? Recovery miles are just as important for improving fitness as intervals.

You can do this either outside or on the trainer. Start with a 3 minute warm up, then spin at a steady, easy pace for at least 20 minutes. You should be at no more than 60% of your max heart rate at any point. This may not feel like you’re accomplishing anything, but you’re keeping your muscles limber, and helping to flush lactic acid from the larger muscle groups. This aids in recovery, and helps keep you fresh for your next day of intervals. This is also a great time to work on cadence and pedaling form.

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Learn more about choosing the right trainer

 
 

Road Bikes: Rim Brakes Vs. Disc Brakes

 

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The last decade or so has seen some massive changes for road bikes. The mainstream shift from aluminum to carbon fiber in the 2000’s marked the beginning of a new era in bike design, while the introduction of electronic drivetrains in the last 5 years or so has seen a fundamental rethinking of how bikes shift. But what about how bikes stop?

It started slowly. Very slowly, in fact. But in the last year or two, disc brakes on road bikes have really caught on, and are set to create yet another revolution. As always, there are fits and starts, and not everybody is on board (we’re looking at you, UCI), but like most changes, this one is gaining momentum.

Over the last year we’ve had a chance to test ride quite a few disc brake road bikes. Here’s how we thought they fared versus standard rim brakes.

STOPPING POWER

Disc brakes. There is no question about this. Disc brakes deliver incredible stopping power in pretty much all weather conditions. What’s more, that power is easily modulated, which means it’s easier to control how much brake you need at any given time. Often times no more than one-finger  is needed to stop the bike in a reasonable distance.

Rim brakes, especially with carbon wheels, can sometimes take a little bit to really bite into the rim and slow the bike. This is doubly true if your pads are worn or dirty.

The upward slant of the chainstay helps to minimize hits from bad roads, and helps perfectly position the disc caliper

Disc brakes provide superior stopping power and modulation over rim brakes

Shop for disc brake road bikes

COMPATIBILITY

Rim brakes—for now. Disc brakes are still going through growing pains, and in an industry where the term “standard” is pretty much meaningless, that can mean some headaches for consumers. Some disc brake bikes come with standard quick release wheels, some use thru axle. There are all different kinds of rotor sizes out there, and aftermarket wheel options are still fairly limited.

But these are actually fairly minor problems.

This year will pretty much guarantee a bumper crop of disc brake wheel options, and most of those will be interchangeable between QR and thru axle, making them more versatile for consumers.

ridley_helium_06

For the moment, rim brakes have fewer compatibility issues than disc brakes

Shop for road bikes

WET WEATHER

Disc brakes. This is a no brainer. No matter what is falling from the sky or laying on the roads, disc brakes don’t care. Snow, ice, and rain don’t have much of an effect on disc brakes—regardless of rim material.

Wet weather conditions can severely limit the effectiveness of rim brakes, especially carbon wheels.

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If you’re riding in wet weather, there’s only one way to go when it comes to brakes

Shop for disc brake road bikes

EASE OF INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE

Rim brakes. Frankly, these are pretty easy. Make sure they’re facing the right way, bolt them on, make sure they’re roughly centered and go. Every other year or so you change the pads.

Disc brakes…not so much. Mechanical disc brakes can be notoriously frustrating to install and get centered so they aren’t rubbing the disc rotor. Hydraulic disc brakes are easier to install, but maintenance can be an involved and time consuming, since you have to bleed the lines, replace hydraulic fluid, etc…

fenix_03

For all their benefits, disc brakes aren’t always as easy to maintain as rim brakes

Shop for road bikes

WEIGHT AND AERODYNAMICS

Rim brakes. Because of the simple design, rim brakes are currently much, much lighter than any available disc brake system.

And, because of where the brake is placed, disc brakes are also much less aerodynamic than rim brakes.

Bear in mind though that this is  likely to change in the next couple of years. As disc brakes become more widely adopted and pressure builds to use them in racing, the industry is likely to begin refining the designs to be lighter, and better incorporated into frames for improved aerodynamics.

fuji_altamira_sl_007

What they lack in stopping power, rim brakes make up for in weight savings and aerodynamics

Shop for road bikes

THE VERDICT

More than any other decision, this is going to be a very personal choice. Disc brakes offer unquestionably better and more consistent stopping power than rim brakes, but at a cost of weight and aerodynamics, and they are still not yet race-legal.

It’s all a matter of what’s most important to you—and we don’t mean stopping power (that’s important to everyone).

What we mean is that if you love racing, fast road riding, and having plenty of wheel options, then it might be best to stick with rim brakes for the time being.

If you’re just looking for a road bike to ride for the love of riding, like to explore gravel roads, bomb big descents, ride in an area that experiences frequent bad weather, or even for racers looking for a second road bike for training and base miles, then disc brakes are probably the better option.

Without question though, disc brakes are the way forward—so love them or hate them, odds are in the next 5 years, most road bikes will be equipped with them.

So tell us your thoughts. What do you think about using disc brakes on road bikes?

2014 Year In Review

While we’re already looking ahead at 2015, but as we close out 2014 we wanted to take a moment to look back at the 10 best stories and posts that we’ve shared throughout the year – we’ve got even more planned for the coming year, so stay tuned!

1. Real Advice: How To Properly Clean Your Water Bottle

how_to_clean_your_water_bottle_1

Apparently a lot of you were curious about how to get more mileage out of your water bottles. Real Advice: How To Properly Clean Your Water Bottle was our top post of the year.

 

2. Throw Down: Electronic vs. Mechanical Shifting

mech-vs-elec

This one struck a chord with a lot of people out there. Love it or leave it, electronic shifting is finding it’s way on to more an more bikes, so we weighed the pro’s and con’s of each.

 

3. Ridden and Reviewed: Diamondback Century Sport Disc

dback_century_sport_disc_9

For those of you who always wonder how the bikes stay upright in our photos….here’s a small hint. :)

 

We test rode a lot of bikes this year, and this was one of our favorites. As the disc road movement gained more momentum this year, the Diamondback Century Sport Disc no longer seemed so much a fish-out-of-water as a bike ahead of the curve.

 

4. Ridden and Reviewed: Ridley Helium

ridley_helium_01This year we were super excited to introduce Ridley Bikes to Performance. Among the most popular was the Ridley Helium. We got to test ride this bike at the source: in Hasselt, Belgium and man, were we impressed.

 

5. Choosing The Right Chain Lube

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Wet or dry…or something else entirely? This one got a lot of discussion, and a lot of you shared some helpful tips about how you take care of your chains.

 

6. Ridden and Reviewed: Ridley Fenix

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The Ridley Fenix was probably one of the most versatile bikes we rode this year. From the cobbles of Belgium to the roads around our home offices, this bike was as popular with us as it was with you.

 

7. 5 Ways To Stay Warm On Cold Rides

hot bidon

Polar Vortex 8 hit a little earlier this year, which left a good number of cyclists all across the country scrambling to figure out how to get rides in. We shared our favorite tips to help you stay warm when the temps drop.

 

8. Ridden and Reviewed: Diamondback Interval Carbon

diamondback_interval_carbon_002

Probably one of the most unique and coolest bikes we saw this year, the Diamondback Interval Carbon was a sleeper hit, both in the stores and here on the blog. With a high performance carbon frame and all-day comfort, it’s not hard to see why.

 

9. Alternative Road Bikes: The Only Bike You Need?

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2014 saw a lot of changes in direction for the cycling industry, and perhaps the biggest one was a move towards alternatives to traditional racing bikes. Alternative road bikes with bigger tire clearance, non-UCI compliant geometry, and disc brakes are becoming more commonplace, and more popular.

 

10. Ridden and Reviewed: Charge Cooker Maxi Fat Bike

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2014 saw fat bikes explode in popularity. When Polar Vortex 6 hit North Carolina, we got a chance to take one out and give it a spin, proving (to us at least) that the performance matches the hype.

 

So there it is. The Top 10 of 2014.

What was your favorite post of 2014? Let us know in the comments.

And don’t forget to check back next year for tons of new commentary, reviews, how-to’s and more.

 

 

Real Advice: Achieve Your Cycling Goals in 2015

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A few years ago my wife and I decided to stop making New Years Resolutions, and start making New Years Goals. This might sound like an eye-rolling game of word play, but bear with me a minute.

We realized that we seldom (never) stayed with our resolutions for long, because by saying vague things like “I’m going to bike commute to work more”, “I’m going to wake up early to train”, or “this year I’m going to get back into racing”, you’re not laying yourself any pathway for success. You’re just saying things you’d like to do, but they’re not goal oriented, and there’s no real way to chart your progress.

Once we started making Goals, things got off to a different start, because behind each Goal was a plan with clear, actionable steps.

Here is our guide to help you make 2015 your year to finally achieve those cycling goals.

Step 1: Set a Goal

Pick something that’s important to you, and be as specific as you can. Set specific monthly mileage, pick out a target goal event, etc… Make it challenging, but also rewarding.

If it’s an event, then pick out a time you want to be able to complete it in (i.e. ride a century in under 6 hours). If it’s mileage, then pick something that’s far above what you’re already doing (i.e. go from 75 miles a week to 200 miles a week).

Eddie MTB 2

Signing up for a goal event, like Eddie did with Shenandoah, is a great way to ensure you stay on track

Looking for a goal? Try a local charity rides, or a gran fondo or mountain bike race.

 
 

Step 2: Is this a goal you’ve set before?

Did you achieve it? Were you happy with the result? Why didn’t you achieve it, or how can you do better next year? This gives you a chance to do an after-action review on previous goals and examine what you can do differently this year.

An example: my goal for 2015 was the Alpine Loop Gran Fondo. While I finished, I wasn’t super happy with how I rode. Here’s my assessment why:

-Too few long distance build-up events

-Too little time spent in the mountains

-Inadequate fueling/hydrating in the first half of the event

-Carried too much clothing and repair supplies

-Bike was overbuilt for durability, and ended up being heavier than I would have liked

Brian's titanium Scattante frame should be the right tool for the job

Look back on previous goals, and see how you can improve on them

Having trouble getting over hills? Check out our How-To Article to make it easier.

 
 

Step 3: Start Planning

Get out a calendar, a notebook, and a pencil and start planning how you’ll achieve your goal. Look at what you wrote down for Step 2, and think about what might need to do differently this year to be more successful.

Some tips:

Set mini-goals for every week and every month that can help you chart your progress

If your goal is an event, mark the date on the calendar and work backwards from there

Look for secondary goals you can set through the year that can help you build fitness (smaller events, local group rides, etc…)

You don’t want to get down into the nitty gritty of what you’ll be doing on every day months in advance—part of making a plan successful is making it flexible and allowing for life to happen—but you should have a weekly idea of what needs to happen.

Remember you have a whole year to work with, and you don’t have to do it all at once.

Testing the Ultra kit on cobbles

Planning out challenging rides in advance can help keep you motivated and on track

Looking for a new challenge to help you prepare? How about a Group Ride?

 
 

Step 4: Is This Goal Realistic?

This is where you need to be really, brutally honest with yourself. You need to decide if this is a goal that is either too hard or too easy, and if it’s a plan you can realistically stick to. Look for challenges you need to take into account (i.e. kids, family time, work commitments, etc…). Once you’ve done this, think of ways to get around the challenges.

Example:

If you’re someone who struggles to get going in the morning, making waking up a 5:00 AM to ride a part of your plan isn’t something you’re likely to stick to for long.

Instead, you might want to start by trying to wake up just 30 minutes earlier than normal and getting in a ride on the trainer instead.

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Make your plan realistic, and look for ways around challenges. If you can’t make it out the door at 5:00AM, trying waking up just 30 minutes earlier than normal for a trainer session

Need an indoor workout? Try Riding On Rollers.

 
 

Step 5: Track Your Progress

At the end of every week do an assessment of your progress. Are you following your plan and getting closer to achieving your goal?

If not, take a close look at why you aren’t and what’s happening. Talking with friends or family can be really important for helping you identify things that might be going wrong (even if you don’t want to hear them) and figuring out how to get back on track.

Using social media can also be a giant help in keeping you accountable and getting support. Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are incredibly useful to keep track of your progress, update your friends and family, and help keep you motivated.

philadelphia_cycling_with_fuji_22

Remember, big achievements happen through a series of small steps. Keep your eye on the prize, Tiger.

 Here are some other helpful articles to help you reach your goals:

Avoid fatigue on long rides.

Weight Loss For Cyclists

Words of Wisdom for Novice Riders

Guide to Cycling Etiquette

5 Reasons to Join a Group Ride

6 Steps to Master The Paceline

6 Tips For Traveling With A Bike

Working Out At Work

Build a Home Gym For Under $250

4 Articles To Get You Through The Holidays

Happy Holidays from Performance Bicycle! We hope you’re enjoying the time with friends and family.

But like you, we’re starting to crave some bike time. Realistically though, that’s not going to happen for a few more days. So we went back through the blog and found some of our favorite articles that got us pumped to start get out and ride…or at least some motivation to avoid the cookie tray next time.

1. 5 Tips for Cold Weather Riding

No matter how cold it is, follow these tips and you’ll be able to enjoy a ride outside.

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2. Cyclists Guide To Surviving the Holidays—2015

Family time, food, and booze. Follow these tips to ensure you start the new year in (close to) good shape.

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3. Build a Home Gym On A Budget

Not feeling the outside riding? You can still get in a good work out, by building a complete home gym for as little as $250.

The foam roller is one of the best recovery tools available to any athlete

The foam roller is one of the best recovery tools available to any athlete

4. Alternative Road Bikes

Didn’t get the bike you wanted? Maybe this is your chance to get the bike you need. Today’s alternative road bikes are tough, faster, and more capable than ever.

The GT Grade is one of the most exciting gravel bikes yet

The GT Grade is one of the most exciting gravel bikes yet

5 Things We Can’t Wait For In 2015

2015

1. SRAM Electronic, New Drivetrain Players

Making a return from last year’s list: SRAM electronic drivetrains. This year we made the switch to electronic drivetrains on our personal bikes—with Campagnolo Record EPS and Shimano Ultegra Di2, respectively. We couldn’t be happier, but are increasingly intrigued by SRAM’s near-mythical wireless electronic shifting system. It’s said to be introduced in 2015, and we’re definitely looking forward to see how it stacks up against the more traditional wired systems.

2015 is also rumored to see the introduction of an FSA electronic drivetrain, and some sort of drivetrain from Rotor (fabled Spanish maker of aluminum cranks, power meters, and Q-Rings oval-shaped chainrings), although whether it will be mechanical or electronic is still unknown. This will give the drivetrain market its first real shake up since 2006 when SRAM introduced their Force groupset.

 

2. New Helmets From Performance

2015 will see a raft of new helmet brands and models hitting our proverbial and literal shelves. We can’t tell you exactly what they are yet, but we can say that they grace the heads of some today’s best professional racers. Also coming soon will be the Smith Overtake—which we’re super pumped about.

 

Here's a small hint...

Here’s a small hint…

 

3. Shimano XTR M9050 Di2

Di2 on a mountain bike? Sure, why not. Electronic shifting systems have already more than proved themselves on the road, so it’s about time that they made the switch to the trails. We got to take a quick peak at it at some of the trade shows and it looked mighty impressive. Shimano XTR is already arguably one of the finest mountain bike components groupsets available, so Di2 should only make it that much better.

The new XTR 9050 Di2 looks pretty amazing

The new XTR 9050 Di2 looks pretty amazing

 

4. Performance Custom Wheels

A long time ago, in another building far, far away, Performance was known as a one-stop shop for custom wheels. But while the wheel building machine in our warehouse has long since been shut down, we’ve never stopped thinking about the perfect hoops. So over the course of the past year we got to working on how we could start making the wheels we really want to ride, and providing them to customers at a great value.

In 2015 we’re excited to announce that we’ll be returning to the custom-built wheel game. We’ve curated a carefully selected wheel collection, and carefully matched up what we think are some perfect rim/hub/spoke combinations. The result are some unique and exciting wheels from Stan’s, Shimano, and Reynolds, custom-built only for Performance Bicycle.

 

New custom-built wheels, like these Shimano Ultegra hubs to Mavic Open Pro rims, will be arriving throughout 2015

New custom-built wheels, like these Shimano Ultegra hubs to Mavic Open Pro rims, will be arriving throughout 2015

 

5. New Clothing Offerings

It’s not just wheels that we gave some serious thought to this year. Clothing was also high on our agenda—more specifically clothes for those rides that are more about the destination than the ride itself (think riding around town, touring, bike camping, etc…).

We’ve been hard at work designing, picking out fabrics, and testing and are pretty pleased with what we came up with. We can’t show them to you just yet, but keep an eye out around February.

We can't show you too much...but here's a sneak peak of some new clothes in the works

We can’t show you too much…but here’s a sneak peak of some new clothes in the works

2015 Holiday Gift Inspiration

Looking for a gift for the cyclist in your life? Maybe you’re a cyclist looking for a few goodies to add to your wishlist or a “Happy Holidays to Me” package. We’ve got you covered. Our website has thousands of bike parts, clothing, and bikes to choose from. But sifting through that stuff can be a little daunting. So we’ve picked out some of our favorite stuff.

Back again this year is the 2015 Holiday Inspiration list. We polled riders around our office for the stuff that they want for the holidays.

If you’re still wondering if there’s time to get that last minute gift, don’t worry! Orders placed by 12/22 with 2nd Business Day shipping, or order placed by 12/23 with Overnight shipping will still arrive in plenty of time.

And of course our retail stores will remain open until 12/24.

 

 

Sarah

Marketing department

Triathlete, aspiring mountain biker, weeknight concert goer

  1. Garmin Forerunner 910 XT GPS watch with Premium Heart Rate Monitor
  2. Giro Women’s Feather Mountain Bike Helmet
  3. Performance Women’s Thermal II Tights
  4. Performance Cabot Softshell Gloves
  5. Performance Women’s Tone Henley Long Sleeve Jersey

DREAM GIFT: Grand Canyon Connector Bike Trip– Cedar City, UT to Tempe, AZ. Hits Zion National Park and the Grand Canyon

sarah

Eddie 

Accessories Buyer

Mountain biker, CX up-and-comer, one-time pig owner

  1. Bell Super 2 MTB Helmet
  2. Giro Terraduro MTB Shoes
  3. CamelBak M.U.L.E. NV Hydration Pack
  4. Kuat NV 2-Bike Hitch Rack
  5. Schwalbe Hans Dampf Tires

DREAM GIFT: Week-long trip to Whistler, BC

Eddie

Brian

Social Media Team

Roadie, unrepentant Italophile, coffee enthusiast

  1. Castelli Gabba Convertible Jacket
  2. Bell Star Pro Helmet
  3. Smith Pivlock Overdrive Sunglasses
  4. Louis Garneau Course Thermal Bib Shorts
  5. Skratch Labs Apples and Cinnamon Hydration Mix

DREAM GIFT: Trip to the Pinarello Gran Fondo in Trentino, Italy

 Brian

Holiday Hack: DIY Bike Wheel Wreath and Ornaments

With the holidays coming up, it’s time to start digging through your spare parts bin to create some Christmas decor that shows off your cycling spirit. It only takes a few minutes to pull off these bike-inspired designs – and you’ll end up with the coolest decorations on the block!

5 Steps to Create a Bicycle Wheel Wreath

Christmas Bike Wheel WreathThis twist on the classic wreath couldn’t be more simple to put together. All that you need to make it happen is an old wheel, some decorative garland, a string of christmas lights, some zip ties, and a big red bow or a few ornaments. Click on the images below to view the step-by-step instructions:

2 Easy Chain Link Ornaments

christmas_bike_decor_025

Here’s a quick and easy way to make some cool little ornaments out of those leftover bits of chain that you always end up with after installing a new one. Click on the images below to view the step-by-step instructions:

Cassette Tree Topper and Ornaments

Do you have a pile of old cassettes gathering dust in the corner? Stack them on top of the tree to make an unusual tree topper, or just pull out individual cogs and hang them up as ornaments. Just make sure to clean them off first! Click on the images below to view more:

Post your cycling holiday decoration ideas in the comments!

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