CX ’15 Preview #1: Van Dessel Aloominator

Smell that? That’s right… ‘cross is coming*. And if you don’t know what to smell for, it’s the scent of crisp fall air, mud, french fries (a.k.a. frites), tubular glue, embrocation, and post-race Belgian beer. While most of us may feel like summer just got here, many riders are already looking forward to crisp autumn days when they can ride their bikes around a muddy field while people ring cowbells and yell at them.

*If you’re not sure what cyclocross is or what all the fuss is about, check out our article here.

And to help get you even more pumped, we’ll be giving you some previews of the hottest new cyclocross bikes and technology for this upcoming season. Everything from Van Dessels that were handmade in Portland, Oregon U.S.A., to SRAM CX 1, to the newest high-tech Ridleys fresh in from Flanders.

van_dessel_aloominator

First up, we’re taking a look at the Van Dessel Aloominator.

Van Dessel is a small operation out of New Jersey, run by former racer (and real life Belgian) Edwin Bull. Like most guys who raced in Belgium, Edwin developed an undying love for cyclocross, which has seen him spend the last decade or so pursuing the ultimate CX machine. His earlier Gin and Trombones and Full Tilt Boogie bikes quickly become ‘cross classics, and to ride one was to experience ultimate performance.

The essence of what sets the Aloominator apart is the frame. Each and every Aloominator is made in Portland, Oregon—arguably the homeland of American cyclocross. Finding a production frame that’s made in the U.S. is a rarity these days, but it’s something that Van Dessel felt was important, and they’ve worked hard to make something special that performs well under the worst conditions, and that’s also affordable.

The Aloominator has a durable powdercoat finish so you don’t have to worry about chipping the paint, and comes equipped with an Easton EC90XD disc-brake fork. Of course it would be a shame to build up a Made in the U.S. of A. frame anything but the best parts, which is why the Aloominator comes equipped with FSA SL-K stem and seatpost, FSA Energy handlebar, FSA SL-K CX crankset, Prologo Scratch Pro saddle, and Shimano Ultegra 11-speed components.

Check out more in our gallery below, and check back soon to see more CX ’15 product previews.

Women’s Pro Cycling: La Course by Le Tour de France

la_course_by_le_tour_de_france_header

La Course by Le Tour de France

The upcoming La Course by Le Tour de France race is going to shine a spotlight on women’s pro cycling, as top women’s teams will be competing on the same finishing circuit in Paris just hours before the final stage of the men’s Tour de France, including the famous finish on the Champs Elysees. While this 90km race is not the same as having a full 3 week Grand Tour, holding it on the same day and location as the final stage of the men’s race means that it will get coverage for an elite women’s race unlike anything that’s happened before. We are excited to watch a great race and see an emphasis on women’s pro cycling – especially the Optum Pro Cycling presented by Kelly Benefit Strategies team racing on their Diamondback bikes!

Equal pay for equal pain

A few weeks ago we got the opportunity to see some of these pro cyclists in action at the Philly Cycling Classic, one of the toughest one day races on the women’s cycling calendar. The slogan of the race was “equal pay for equal pain”, as the men’s and women’s races featured equal prize money. The race was a fantastic showcase for women’s cycling, with a closely fought competition only settled on the last climb of the Manayunk Wall, when Evelyn Stevens pulled out victory in a ferocious sprint.

Q+A session with top female pros at the Philly Cycling Classic

Q+A session with top female pros at the Philly Cycling Classic

Importance of sponsoring women’s pro cycling

One of the most interesting parts of the weekend was the chance to hear directly from the pros at a question and answer session before the race. Before the cyclists spoke, Karen Bliss, Vice President of Marketing for Fuji, talked about how important it was for Fuji to sponsor riders and teams – for product development, brand recognition, and authority in the cycling world. Fuji puts a special focus on supporting and developing women’s teams because they see the potential for growth – Karen is an accomplished former professional rider herself, a seven-time national champion on the road and track, and sits on the UCI women’s cycling commission. Also speaking was Lisa Nutter, the wife of the Mayor of Philadelphia – she is an avid cyclist and a huge advocate for cycling in Philadelphia. Mrs. Sutter got back into cycling in her 40s, and now seriously competes on the track and the road – she was a big influence on the “equal pay for equal pain” idea.

 Can we compete with the men? We’d like to find out!

As the pros got the chance to answer questions, it became clear that they are just as dedicated, motivated and competitive as the male pros, but their opportunities for exposure and financial success were not the same. Alison Powers, the current US national road, criterium and time trial champion, spoke about there needed to be a change of mindset for cycling fans, promoters, and her fellow female pros – they needed to create an expectation for better treatment and improved exposure. This would lead to better teams, races, and opportunities to grow the sport. Her fellow pros train as much as the men, 8-20 hours a week, but they don’t train for the same distance since the UCI limits their races to 140km. When asked if female pros could compete in a men’s race, Powers and other replied that if they did train for the same distance as the men, they could probably hang in the race – maybe not to the end, but they’d like the chance to find out!

So the biggest difference between the men and women pro riders was in the opportunities they had to succeed. When asked if they also worked full time in addition to their racing, almost every pro in attendance raised her hand to say that they had to work another job – this might be expected at a lower level men’s team, but these were some of the top women’s teams in the world. That’s why the opportunity to showcase their talent at a showcase as big as La Course by Le Tour de France is such a big deal. We hope that it opens some doors, and some eyes, for just how entertaining women’s pro cycling can be.

What do you think would improve the acceptance of women’s pro cycling?

Ridley In Yellow

Tony Gallopin's custom painted Ridley Helium SL celebrates his wearing of the Yellow Leaders Jersey

Tony Gallopin’s custom painted Ridley Helium SL celebrates his wearing of the Yellow Leaders Jersey

On behalf of Performance Bicycle, we’d like to congratulate Tony Gallopin and the entire Lotto-Belisol team for capturing the Yellow Jersey at the Tour de France yesterday. After a hard day of riding, Gallopin was able to take the overall lead of the race from Vincenzo Nibali (Astana). Few professional riders will ever have the honor to earn the Yellow leader’s jersey at The Tour, and Gallopin definitely earned it with an amazing ride that saw him finish over 8 minutes ahead of most of the other riders.

It’s a huge accomplishment, and a career-defining moment for Gallopin.

To honor the occasion, Ridley painted up a special bike for Tony. Joachim Aerts, founder and CEO of Ridley, came into the office late on Sunday to personally select, prep, and paint a Ridley Helium SL in Ridley‘s new “retro” paint scheme.. They worked fast, and managed to hand-deliver the bike to the team to be built up for the start of the next stage of the race today (Monday, 14 July).

Check out his new bike below.

Shop for Bikes of the Tour

Shop for Bikes of the Tour

Want to learn more? Check out our articles below.

Ridden and Reviewed: Lazer Sports Z1 Helmet

The Z1 in action in Belgium

Testing the Z1 in Belgium

Back in April we got a chance to visit Lazer Sports at their headquarters in Antwerp, Belgium to check out their Lazer Z1 helmet. This brand-new helmet is designed to improve performance, enhance safety, and keep the rider cooler.

We first got a chance to try it out during the Ronde van Vlaanderen Sportif, and have been giving it a longer term test drive over the last few months in a variety of conditions.

About The Z1

When designing the Z1, Lazer created a whole new line of helmets, instead of just improving on previous models. While the helmet retains Lazer’s signature look and the Roll-Sys basket suspension system, it goes in a wholly new direction from previous helmets. Lazer has traditionally focused on making very lightweight helmets, but with the Z1 they looked at ways they could improve on safety and aerodynamics, while still retaining their fabled lightweight.

The biggest safety improvement is the T-Pro design. The T-Pro is an area of the front of the helmet that comes down further to better protect the temples in the event of a fall, and offer better side impact protection. In studying how cyclists fall when they crash, Lazer’s designers realized that the temples, one of the most vulnerable parts of the head, were under-protected by existing helmet designs.

The Z1 also has a redesigned vent layout that helps channel around the head to keep you cool, the Advanced Roll-Sys adjustment system, and an integrated airfoil wing to improve aerodynamics. The back of the helmet also functions as a “glasses garage” for Lazer-brand sunglasses.

The buckle is also compatible with Lazer’s Café Lock, which lets you use your helmet as a (very) temporary bike lock when you make your coffee stop.

 

Out Of The Box

The Z1 comes in three sizes (S, M, and L), and includes a removable aeroshell covering, which snaps on to cover the vents, offering better protection from the cold and rain, and improving aerodynamics. It also comes with a small plastic piece that inserts into the top of the helmet and protects the Roll-Sys adjustment mechanism from mud and grit—an essential for cyclocross season.

 

The Z1 is the lastest evolution in Lazer's line of helmets

The Z1 is the lastest evolution in Lazer’s line of helmets

The Fit

The Lazer Z1 helmet definitely has a more comfortable fit than previous Lazer helmets, and the new Advanced Roll-Sys adjustment system makes it incredibly easy to fine tune and adjust the helmet. Like previous Lazer helmets, however, the fit isn’t for everyone. The shape of the helmet is similar to Giro or Specialized, which means it should fit those with a slightly rounder head a little better. If you have a more oval-shaped head, you might want to look at a different model of helmet.

Lazer's designers hand sculpted the original helmet mold to ensure the perfect fit

Lazer’s designers hand sculpted the original helmet mold to ensure the perfect fit

The Ride

We initially used the Z1 in Belgium, but have also been able to test it here at our offices in North Carolina. Our first impression is that it’s probably one of the lightest helmets we’ve ever used. For the past few years we’ve been riding the Giro Aeon—one of the lightest helmets around, and the Lazer Z1 helmet feels about comparable on the head. It is also noticeably cooler than previous Lazer helmets we’ve tried, with excellent airflow even on the hottest summer days we’ve encountered yet. Sometimes even the lightest helmets can still feel suffocating on really hot, humid days, but the Z1 has the nice combination of being lightweight and having huge vents, which we find provide excellent cooling options.

Fortunately we haven’t had a chance to test the improved safety features of the Z1 yet, but on the head it definitely feels more secure, and like it provides much more coverage. Just looking at the helmet in the mirror, we can see that it covers more parts of the head, especially on the side, which gives us a lot of confidence in it’s ability to protect if the worst should happen. It actually comes down far enough that you can see parts of the helmet in your peripheral vision, which took a little bit of getting used to.

The Aeroshell definitely helped us stay warm in Belgium

The Aeroshell definitely helped us stay warm in Belgium

The removable aeroshell is a nice addition too, since it turns the Z1 into a four-season helmet. On some shorter, faster group rides where overheating hasn’t been much of an issue, we simply snap the shell on to close off the vents and get some free speed. The aeroshell also provided excellent protection in the colder, windier, rainier climes of Belgium, where it  helped keep our heads warm and dry. We’ll definitely be using it over the off-season. Be forewarned though, with the aeroshell covering on, there is basically no airflow through the helmet, and it heats up quickly. If it’s hot out, we’d recommend leaving it at home.

One very small niggle one of our testers did have with the helmet was glasses storage. He likes to take his glasses off while climbing or when it’s really hot, and in other helmets he’s usually able to tuck them neatly into the helmet vents for storage. The Z1 vents though are only designed to hold Lazer-brand sunglasses, so his shades won’t stay in the helmet.

 

The Verdict

The Lazer Z1  is one of our favorite new helmets that we’ve gotten to test, and certainly the most versatile. The improved comfort and safety features alone make it well worth it. The included aeroshell and Roll-Sys protection plate also really add to the value of the helmet by making it much more versatile. In one package you essentially get four different helmets: a lightweight summer/climbing helmet, an aero helmet, a winter helmet, and a ‘cross/MTB helmet. It’s an incredible value for the money, and we highly recommend it.

We saw this at Lazer's headquarters. No idea what it is, but we thought we should share it with the world.

This isn’t the Z1– in fact we have no idea what it is, but we thought we should share it with the world.

A Cycling Tour of Philadelphia with Fuji Bikes

philadelphia_cycling_with_fuji_23

Cycling on the Schuylkill River Trail in downtown Philly

A few weeks ago we got to visit Fuji Bikes in their hometown of Philadelphia, PA, and one of the most interesting parts of our trip, other than riding up the infamously challenging Manayunk Wall, was seeing what the City of Brotherly Love has done to welcome cyclists as a part of the city. We got to ride all over the city with our hosts from Fuji Bikes, and we were constantly impressed by how cycling was incorporated into the fabric of the neighborhoods – no doubt one of the main reasons that Philadelphia was recently ranked the 6th most bikeable city in the US.

philadelphia_cycling_with_fuji_24

Cycling sharrows were prominent on city streets

In the downtown areas of the city, we hardly ever rode on streets that did not have bike lanes or prominent sharrows to indicate that cyclists had the right of way. And folks on bikes definitely took advantage of this infrastructure, with commuters, transportation riders, and recreational cyclists out in force on the city streets. The city government is a big supporter of bike riders, even closing down a stretch of Martin Luther King, Jr Drive to car traffic (along the Schuylkill River) on summer weekends so that cyclists have priority to ride and race.

And speaking of recreation, the bi-directional Schuylkill River Trail was packed with coexisting joggers, walkers and cyclists on most days – which is no wonder since it was such an idyllic spot and easily accessible from downtown. Running from the historic Center City, past the Philadelphia Museum of Art (home of the famous “Rocky Steps”), and historic Boathouse Row, and out along the Schuylkill River into the countryside past Valley Forge – the trail is a fantastic outlet for city riders who want to get away from busy city roads. One stop along the trail that shouldn’t be missed is the cycling-friendly Manayunk neighborhood, with its absurdly steep climbs and bicycle-friendly businesses – definitely stop for lunch at Winnie’s Le Bus Manayunk, where they will loan you a bike lock while you eat!

All in all we had a great time cycling around Philadelphia – it’s got more to offer than just the Liberty Bell and Independence Hall (although you should definitely check those out if you come to visit), with a vibrant cycling scene and easy access to scenic roads and trails from downtown. So next time that you visit the City of Brotherly Love, bring your bike and go for a ride!

Check out the gallery below for some views from our rides:

2014 Tour de France Guide

tour_2011_galibier_leaders

What It Is:

The Tour de France is considered the most prestigious bike race in the world. Over 100 years old, the race has been held every year, except during the World Wars. It is also considered to be the most difficult sporting event in the world. Even if you’re not particularly into racing or sports, it’s worth it to watch at least a few stages of The Tour every year (see below) to see the spectacle. There are few things in sports that can match the excitement of two riders battling it out on a high mountain pass or the drama of watching a lone rider try to hang on for a solo win. Despite past issues with doping and scandals, the sport has taken huge steps to clean up its act in recent years, and many say that the sport is now cleaner– and more exciting– than it ever has been in the past.

When:

The Tour de France will start on July 5th, 2014, and ends on July 27th, 2014.

Where:

The Tour will start in Leeds, England. After a few days of racing in the UK, the race will move to France. The final stage will be held in Paris with the traditional finish on the Champs-Elysees.

How Long:

The Tour de France is a 21 day race—with each day of racing called a “stage”. There are two rest days. The stages are divided between “flat” stages, “mountain stages”, and one day with a time trial.

tour_2010_soulor_peloton

The high mountain climbs are some of the most exciting parts of the race to watch

Shop our selection of pro-level bikes

Must Watch Stages:

Stage 1: Saturday, July 5. Watch as The Tour gets off to its start in Leeds, England. All the drama will be focused on Mark Cavendish, who will hope to win the opening stage and wear the yellow jersey for a day on home turf.

Stage 5: Wednesday, July 9. Paris-Roubaix it ain’t, but this stage will feature cobbled roads on the Tour de France for the first time since 2010. Given the difficulty of riding on cobbles, this could be where early favorites get into serious trouble. Expect drama, crashes, and some epic heartbreak. This could be the stage that makes (or unmakes) the race.

Stage 10: Monday, July 14. This is going to be one of the toughest days of mountains that the Tour has seen in quite a while. The route will tackle two Category 3 climbs on the way to the La Planche des Belles Filles—a series of seven Category 1 &2 climbs that average around 8%. There is a chance that the race could be effectively decided on these climbs for both the GC and KOM battles.

Stage 14: Saturday, July 19. This one is going to hurt. As The Tour turns towards the French Alps, the climbs only get worse. This stage will feature the famous hors categorie Col du Izoard climb. After getting up the Col du Lautaret—a 34km long climb, the riders must then tackle the Izoard (19km, average grade 6%). Anyone having a bad day here will be out of the running for the win.

Stage 18: Thursday, July 24. This stage is relatively short, so expect to see some high speed racing in the Pyrenees Mountains, including the infamous Col du Tourmalet—the legendary climb that should see an epic battle between Froome and Contador, as well as anyone else brave enough to try and hang with them.  4° stage Lorient  Mûr-de-Bretagne

Want to look as good as the pro’s?

How It Works:

There are 5 prizes up for grabs in the Tour de France. The overall win, the points prize, the king of the mountains prize, the best young rider, and winning individual stages.

  • General Classification (GC, Yellow Jersey): This is the overall win for the race. The GC winner is the rider with the fastest overall time. The current winner of the race will wear a yellow jersey, which may change hands several times during the race.
  • Points (aka Sprinters Jersey): This is the award for the fastest sprinter in the race. The current points leader wears a green jersey. Unlike the GC contest, the points contest is awarded based on points. Each stage will feature an intermediate sprint in the middle, and a final sprint at the end. Points are awarded for the order in which riders cross.
  • King of the Mountains (aka KOM, Polka Dot Jersey): This goes to the fastest climber in the race. The current KOM leader wears a white and red polka dot jersey. Like the points jersey, the KOM award is based on points. Points are awarded based on the order in which riders make it up categorized climbs (mountains classified as: 5 (easiest), 4, 3, 2, 1, hors categorie (hardest), with the most points awarded for hors categorie finishes).
  • Young Rider: This award goes to the fastest rider under the age of twenty-five. The current leader wears a white jersey. The white jersey is awarded to the under-25 rider with the fastest time.
  • Stage Wins: Many teams will choose to forgo racing for the GC win and instead choose to win individual stages of the race. This is often seen as more prestigious than winning the green, polka dot, or white jersey. Teams may choose to adopt the strategy of “stage hunting” if they have no rider capable of genuinely challenging for the GC win, or to get more attention for the team and their sponsors.
fuji_visit_philly_race_netapp_16

Netapp-Endura (who ride Fuji bikes) are making their Tour de France debut, and are hoping to do something big to mark the occasion

Find great deals on pro-level components

Riders To Watch

GC Contenders:

Chris Froome (Kenya; 2013 winner)—Team Sky

Alberto Contador (Spain; sort-of kind-of former winner?)—Tinkoff-Saxo

Vincenzo Nibali (Italy)– Astana

Alejandro Valverde (Spain)—Movistar

Outside Contenders:

Tejay Van Garderen (USA)—BMC

Andrew Talanksy (USA)—Garmin Sharp

Romain Bardet (France)—AG2r-La Mondiale

Rui Costa (Portugal; current World Champion)—Lampre-Merida

Jurgen Van Den Broeck (Belgium)—Lotto-Belisol

Points:

Peter Sagan (Slovakia;  2012, 2013 points winner)—Cannondale

Mark Canvendish (UK; 2011 points winner)—Omega-Pharma-Quick Step

Marcel Kittel (Germany)—Giant-

Shimano Andre Greipel (Germany)—Lotto-Belisol

KOM:

Joachim Rodriguez (Spain)—Katusha

Pierre Rolland (France)—Europcar

Mikel Nieve (Spain)—Team Sky

Christophe Riblon (France)—AG2r-La Mondiale

Young Rider:

Andrew Talanksy (USA)—Garmin Sharp

Romain Bardet (France)—AG2r-La Mondiale

Michal Kwiatkowski (Poland)—Omega-Pharma-Quick Step

Tejay Van Garderen (USA; 2012 young rider winner) —BMC

Lotto Belisol Skoda team car

Riders are supported by team cars, who supply everything from drinks and snacks to spare wheels,new bikes, and mechanical help

Shop our selection of pro-level bikes

Teams:

The Tour de France will be contested by 22 teams. Each team will usually consist of a GC rider—usually the best all-around rider on the team—who will in theory try to win the entire Tour, though really only a few riders are capable of doing this. He is supported by eight “domestiques”, who will allow the GC rider to draft off of them, keep him away from dangerous riders, get him water and food, and even surrender their bikes or wheels if needed. Teams may also feature sprinters, climbers, rolleurs, and other types of riders who may try to contest for individual stage wins in the sprints or the mountains, if their team decides they no longer need to support their GC rider on that day. The teams for the 2014 Tour de France are:

  • AG2r-La Mondiale (France)            Leader: Romain Bardet (France)
  • Astana (Kazakhstan)                            Leader: Vincenzo Nibali (Italy)
  • Belkin Cycling (Netherlands)        Leader: Bauke Mollema (Netherlands)
  • BMC Racing (USA)                                  Leader: Tejay Van Garderen (USA)
  • Cannondale (Italy)                                Leader: Peter Sagan (Slovakia)
  • FDJ.FR (France)                                       Leader: Thibau Pinot (France)
  • Garmin Sharp (USA)                             Leader: Andrew Talansky (USA)
  • IAM Cycling (Switzerland)              Leader: Sylvan Chavanel (France)
  • Katusha (Russian Federation)      Leader: Joachim Rodriguez (Spain)
  • Lampre-Merida (Italy)                       Leader: Rui Costa (Portugal)
  • Lotto-Belisol (Belgium)                     Leader: Jurgen Van Den Broeck (Belgium)
  • Movistar Team (Spain)                       Leader: Alejandro Valverde (Spain)
  • Omega-Pharma-Quick Step (Netherlands) Leader: Mark Cavendish (UK)
  • Orica Greenedge (Australia)           Leader: Simon Gerrans (Australia)
  • Team Sky (United Kingdom)          Leader: Chris Froome (Kenya)
  • Giant Shimano (Netherlands)       Leader: Marcel Kittel (Germany)
  • Europcar (France)                                 Leader: Pierre Rolland (France)
  • Tinkoff-Saxo (Russian Federation) Leader: Alberto Contador (Spain)
  • Trek Factory Racing (USA)             Leader: Fabian Cancellara (Switzerland)
  • Cofidis (France)                                      Leader: Rein Taaramäe (Latvia)
  • Bretagne Seche Environment (France) Leader: Brice Feillu (France)
  • Netapp-Endura (Germany)            Leader: Leopold Koenig (Czech Republic)

 

Keep an eye out for this legendary fan...

Keep an eye out for this legendary fan…

Throw Down: Lycra or No Lycra

To wear or not to wear, that is the question. Few things seem to divide cycling tribes quite as much as lycra clothing. While for some, a pair of padded bike shorts and a zip up jersey are necessities, for others they are an eye sore that carries certain connotations with it. To be certain, lycra isn’t for everyone—and choosing to wear it or not to wear it is a personal choice.

As with most debates, neither side is right or wrong, necessarily. For the sake of argument though, let’s take a look at some of the pro’s and con’s of lycra.

Lycra is something most riders find a lot of benefit in...but not everyone

Lycra is something most riders find a lot of benefit in…but not everyone

Pro’s:

  • Super Comfortable: There’s no two ways about it, properly fitting lycra shorts and a good jersey are some of the most comfortable clothing you’ll ever wear
  • Feeling Fast: Wearing lycra can make you feel fast, no matter what the reality might be
  • Cushioning: Finding the right pair of padded bike shorts can be a revelation in comfort. The pad helps take the sting out of long days in the saddle, and when you find the brand of shorts that work for you, you’ll never want to ride without them
  • Staying cooler: most cycling clothing now is designed to wick away sweat and is made with fabrics that help you stay cooler
  • More Aero: Wearing cycling jerseys can really cut down on wind drag, since even a club fit jersey will fit more closely than a t-shirt. This might not seem important to the everyday cyclist, but it actually does make a huge difference
  • Part Of The Club: Let’s face it, in certain cycling circles—we’re looking at you roadies—it’s just expected that you’ll wear it
Lycra can make a big day in the saddle a lot easier

Lycra can make a big day in the saddle a lot easier

Con’s:

  • The Confidence Factor: It takes a certain amount of confidence to wear lycra in public, and some people don’t feel comfortable in it
  • Limited Wear Occasions: In lycra, it’s not like you can just step off the bike and go sit at your desk at the start of the work day
  • What It Means: For many, lycra has become a symbol of exclusivity and elitism in the cycling community, and some see the perceived requirement of wearing lycra as an obstacle to getting more people on bikes
For many riders, especially in urban areas, lycra isn't as important

For many riders, especially in urban areas, lycra isn’t as important

A Personal Choice

At the end of the day riding a bike should be fun, regardless of what clothing you choose to wear while doing it. If you do choose to wear lycra, it doesn’t mean you have to limit yourself to the body-hugging race-fit stuff you see on TV. There are many different fit levels available, from straight up t-shirts made of technical fabrics to roomier “club fit” clothing that isn’t as form fitting. And nobody says (well…some people do) that you can’t wear mountain bike baggies on the road if you want to.

And if you choose not to wear lycra, that’s ok too. It’s not for everyone. There are plenty of other clothing options out there that offer bike-friendly features in more casual clothing. Jeans and shirts from Club Ride, Zoic, Performance, and others offer features like reinforced seats, articulated knees, and specially designed pockets to facilitate your non-lycra bike life.

Types of Riders and Their Relationship to Lycra:

The Roadie:

Lycra Love: 10/10

Perhaps no other cycling clan takes their super hero costumes so seriously as the serious road rider. This is usually the guy who shaves his legs and has a bike more expensive than his car. Just wearing lycra isn’t enough. It has to be worn well. Usually the shorts and jersey (collectively called a “kit”) must match in color and brand, and will preferably be a matching set. Wearing pro team clothing when not paid to do so is highly discouraged in this circle, though wearing one’s club kit is acceptable. The kit will usually be color coordinated with the helmet, socks, shoes, gloves, and for the truly dedicated, the bike. Additional rules regarding sock height, short length, and jersey fit may apply.

These roadies find the lunch ride is perfect for matching Performance Ultra kits. Zach gets bonus points for matching socks and helmet

These roadies find the lunch ride is perfect for matching Performance Ultra kits. Zach recieved bonus points for color coordinating his socks and helmet

The Weekend Warrior:

Lycra Love: 7/10

The Weekend Warrior takes a more casual approach to lycra. Sure, they might like things to match, and who doesn’t like some cool socks? But the important thing is comfort and functionality. Shorts add comfort on a long weekend ride, and the jersey provides plenty of cooling and pocket storage as they rack up the miles. It’s not necessarily about fitting in or looking “pro”, so much as it is recognizing the benefits that lycra offers on long, high mileage rides. Lycra clothing is a functional item, but having mismatched kit won’t get in the way of enjoying the ride.

For many riders, wearing lycra is more about comfort and functionality than anything

For many riders, wearing lycra is more about comfort and functionality than anything

The Urban Rider:

Lycra Love: 0/10

Lycra is usually anathema to the urban rider, and not without practical reasons. The urban rider uses the bike primarily for transportation and getting around—which means they ride their bike to get somewhere. While they may wear bike specific clothing, it’s usually more along the lines of Club Ride, which incorporates bike-friendly features into everyday clothing. Urban riders usually also view the association of lycra with bikes as an impediment to getting more people on bikes—a thought that might not necessarily be wrong.

For many riders, cycling clothes don't have to be skin tight, thanks to more casual-- yet functional-- options

For many riders, cycling clothes don’t have to be skin tight, thanks to more casual– yet functional– options

The Mountain Biker:

Lycra Love: 5/10

Ah…the sneaky lycra wearer. While most mountain bikers may outwardly deride road bikers for wearing lycra, the truth is that most mountain bikers secretly wear it. Sure, they might look super casual in their technical t-shirts and baggy shorts, but underneath it all is a pair of padded lycra shorts. And in truth, lately some XC riders have even dispensed with the pretense and started emulating their road biking cousins.

Don't be fooled...underneath those baggy shorts are some padded lycra shorts

Don’t be fooled…underneath those baggy shorts are some padded lycra shorts

If you’re looking for a new suit of clothes, check out our reviews of some of our favorite kits here:

Ridden and Reviewed: Sugoi Ice RP Jersey and Bib Shorts

Ridden and Reviewed: Performance Ultra SL Jersey and Bib Shorts

To learn more about what to look for in a pair of shorts or a jersey, check out our buyer’s guides below:

Learn more about cycling shorts

Learn more about cycling jerseys

Team NetApp Endura Visits Fuji’s Home Office

A few weeks ago we were lucky enough to visit the biggest one day bike race in the US, the Philly Cycling Classic, thanks to an invite from our friends at Fuji Bikes. We had a great time checking out the excitement of the race (especially the finish up the famed Manayunk Wall), but the highlight of the trip was a chance to visit the home office of Fuji Bikes (and their sister brands in the Advanced Sports International or ASI family: Kestrel, Breezer and SE Bikes) with the members of the NetApp team, after the race.

Members of Team NetApp posed for a photo with the Fuji Bikes team

Members of Team NetApp posed for a photo with the Fuji Bikes team, including CEO Pat Cunnane (on the right)

ASI moved to their current headquarters in northern Philadelphia, from New Jersey, in 2004 so that they could triple the size of their warehouse.We followed along as the members of Team NetApp got a chance to meet everyone at the ASI offices, especially the bike design team. We learned more about the product development process, from assessing the market and looking at past sales, to talking to customers, attending trade shows, talking to dealers – even reading every bicycle magazine and good old-fashioned research on the internet. It’s definitely an in-depth process! Just the design process for a new bike can take over a year, and it’s not uncommon for a bike to go from concept to delivery to market in 18 months to 2 years.

We also got to learn more about the ASI/Fuji culture – needless to say they are really into bikes! There is a full Fuji demo fleet in their warehouse so that any employee can check out any type of bike for a month. Even though they are located in Philadelphia, they’re also building a full cyclocross course on the grounds near their warehouse, along with some mountain bike trails. And remember the Norcom Straight triathlon/time trial bike? Norcom Road is a favorite stretch of test road just a short ride from their offices. Fuji is also a huge presence in the local cycling community, with one of their main focuses being the Cadence Cycling Foundation – a group that engages youth through the sport of cycling to help them grow into healthy, responsible, and confident adults.

One of the highlights of the tour was the chance for everyone at ASI to have lunch and chat with the members of the NetApp team, all-rounder Blaz Jarc from Slovenia, classics rider Ralf Matzka from Germany, Jonathan McEvoy from the UK (11th place finisher in Philly),  all-rounder Erick Rowsell from the UK, mountain specialist Frantisek Padour from the Czech Republic (who finished 12th in Philly), and Director Sportif Christian Pomer from Austria (a former pro cyclist himself). Fuji associates got the chance to pepper the members of Team NetApp with questions.

They described their Altamira racing bikes as a good quality all-around bike – light, stiff, and with good handling. The hardest race they’d ever done? Without a doubt, Paris Roubaix – they made it to the end, but the Arenberg cobble section was just super hard, since you go straight into it at a really high speed. They also compared Philly Cycling Classic to Europe and said that it was a different style. At Philly the racing was a lot more aggressive, and they were always fighting for position as it never settled down. In Europe, the racing starts hard, but then a break goes, it settles down, and it only gets really hard again at the end. But they loved the atmosphere on the Manayunk Wall (where they may, or may not, have received beer handups at the end of the race).

The team even talked a bit about how they got started in bike racing – most started in their early teens riding for development programs. In England, their academy system finds kids in grade schools and progresses them through their national Olympic training program – they were full time riders from an early age, but not pro until a few years ago.  They also spoke about the stagiare program – wherein a professional team takes on ‘cycling interns’ starting in August. Young riders are released from their U23 team and get what amounts to a try out for a pro team, for free. It’s a big step up from the lower level, and the riders are under a huge amount of pressure to make a good impression in a few months. They even spoke about what they do in their off time – other than ride bikes, they just like to take a few weeks off the bike and not think about racing at all!

It was a great visit with the ASI/Fuji team, and with Team NetApp – we’re excited to cheer for the team as they compete in the Tour de France in July! To get a little sense of what pro racing is like from inside the peloton, check out this video we put together from the Manayunk Wall at the Philly Cycling Classic:

Rep. David Price Visits Performance

U.S. Representative David Price (NC) visited our offices a few weeks ago

U.S. Representative David Price (NC) visited our offices a few weeks ago

A few weeks ago U.S. Representative David Price (NC) was kind enough to take time from his busy schedule to visit our offices in Chapel Hill and meet with some of our employees. After giving him a tour of our offices and telling him a bit about what we do, we had the opportunity to ask him some questions about the role of the bicycle in American transportation, what’s on the horizon with transportation legislation, and what’s up with those Tiger Grants?

U.S. Rep David Price and our CEO tour the Performance offices

U.S. Rep David Price and our CEO tour the Performance offices

Rep. Price touring our warehouse

Rep. Price touring our warehouse

He answered all of our staff’s questions, and shed a lot of light on what is happening in America right now with transportation policy.

Round table discussion with Rep. David Price

Round table discussion with Rep. David Price

The big things that he stressed were:

  1. Transportation policy will depend on people who care about transportation policy, individual health, wellbeing, the environment and livable spaces taking a more active role in government decision making, at the local, state and federal level
  2. Transportation policy isn’t just about paving more roads, it’s about “transportation enhancements” that include rail, transit alternatives, pedestrians and cyclists
  3. On a local level, the more specific we can be with infrastructure improvement plans the better our chances of getting the plans implemented.
Rep. Price also met with many of our warehouse staff

Rep. Price also met with many of our warehouse staff

In short, he highlighted the fact that we need to fight for better transportation alternatives, and for bikes to have a place, and encouraged us all– and you– to keep your representatives at the local, state and national level accountable when it comes to legislation that affects us as cyclists.

 

Ridden and Reviewed: Sugoi RP Ice Jersey and Sugoi RP Bib Shorts

The Sugoi RS Ice jersey and RP bib shorts are excellent for hot days

The Sugoi RP Ice jersey and RP bib shorts are excellent for hot days

With a Southern summer in full swing around our offices in North Carolina, we’re always looking for new ways to stay cool on our lunch rides. Riding in the heat of the day, when June temps can reach 95 with 90% humidity can really take it out of you, especially if you wear the wrong clothes.

While some of the new mesh climbing jerseys are great, on really sunny days we still want something that will keep us from getting a sunburn. So when the clothing guys showed us our new Sugoi RP Ice jersey and RP bib shorts– available exclusively from Performance Bicycle– we figured we’d test it out to see if it actually works.

The racy pro-fit provides plenty of compression mixed with all-day comfort

The racy pro-fit provides plenty of compression mixed with all-day comfort

 The Jersey

The RS Ice jersey uses Icefil technology to reflect infared light and keep you cooler

The RP Ice jersey uses Icefil technology to reflect infared light and keep you cooler

The idea behind the jersey is that it uses Icefil technology that helps block thermal infared light (the kind that makes you feel hot) and wicks away sweat to speed evaporative cooling. It also has a Xylitol fabric treatment that generates a cooling effect when it comes into contact with moisture, helping to draw away some heat. Sugoi claims that it will keep you cooler, even though the jersey has significantly fewer mesh panels than comparable hot-weather jerseys.

The big thing we noticed about the jersey is how remarkably light it feels. In fact, it feels about as light as some breezy, sunburn-prone mesh jerseys we have. The light feeling goes a long way towards how cool the jersey feels on a hot day.

The day we took the jersey out was about 96 F with 89% humidity. It was the kind of day when you start feeling like an egg on a skillet the minute you walk outside. The RP Ice jersey was more than equal to the ride though. The first thing we noticed immediately was that the fabric didn’t feel like it was soaking up heat in the sun. Normally you can just feel a jersey getting hot, but the jersey felt fairly cool while just sitting in the sun waiting for everyone else in the ride to show up.

Active vent side panels help shed body heat that builds up inside the jersey

Where we really noticed the cooling effect was while riding. Usually our test day would have been an open-jersey ride, but we stayed pretty much zipped up during most of the ride (except for the long climb) without feeling like we were overheating or suffocating. While we did kind of miss feeling of airflow you get from some thinner jerseys, we found we didn’t really need it. The Sugoi jersey was plenty breathable, and wicked away sweat really well and dried very fast, so we didn’t get that wet towel feeling.

The jersey has a locking zipper, and back pockets that give you plenty of room to store tubes, tools, food and a phone.

The RP Ice jersey also features a pro-fit, which means it will be a tight, aerodynamic cut. Our tester found he probably could have gone down a jersey size as well, but that could vary depending on your body type. The body-hugging, contoured fit actually felt really nice, without the cloying, clingy feeling you sometimes get from jerseys that fit like this.

A big reflective stripe on the back helps you stay visible

A big reflective stripe on the back helps you stay visible

The Shorts

As great as jersey’s are, it’s the shorts that can really make or break a kit, since that’s the part actually contacting the saddle. The Sugoi RP shorts feature an excellent molded, multi-density chamois pad, which is perfect for longer rider with plenty of padding. It provided plenty of padding in all the right places, especially on the sit bones, which can sometimes be an issue—given our tester’s preference for minimally padded saddles.

The Sugoi RP shorts provide plenty of comfort and support during hard efforts and long days

The Sugoi RP shorts provide plenty of comfort and support during hard efforts and long days

The lycra is a little bit heavier than we were expecting, but actually breathes quite well. The material also provided plenty of compression, without feeling overly constrictive—it felt like it was giving our muscles support, which actually felt really great toward the end of our ride when we started to feel a little fatigued. The leg gripper has a really solid feel, and stayed in place no matter how much we sweated, even when our sunscreen started to run off.

The Verdict

The Sugoi RP Ice jersey and RP shorts are definitely a go-to summer combo.

The Sugoi RP jersey, as far as cooling goes, is right up there with some of the best summer-weight jersey’s we’ve tried, with the added bonus that it provides a lot more sun protection. It’s definitely one a good one for hot, sunny days, when not just overheating, but getting sunburned can be an issue.

The shorts are very comfortable, with a good mix of compression and support, and a pretty solid (not literally) chamois. We found them to be pretty ideal for rides of any length– be it a short hour-long hammer ride where the compression can help prevent fatigue, or a longer weekend ride where the chamois can prevent soreness and keep you comfortable.

The Sugoi jersey and shorts are also available in a women’s version, available here.

The Sugoi RS Ice jersey and RP shorts will help you perform you best on hot days

The Sugoi RP Ice jersey and RP shorts will help you perform you best on hot days

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 161 other followers

%d bloggers like this: