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Ask Performance Answers – 10/4/13

Last week on the Performance Bike Facebook page we asked folks to post questions about bikes or cycling that they wanted an answer to, in a segment we called #AskPerformance. Today we’re going to answer some of your questions below, but if you’ve got other vexing cycling queries, please post them in the comments below and we’ll do our best to find you an answer!

Ron S.: Is it too much to have more than 5 bikes? ;-) #AskPerformance

Ah, the age-old question – the most quoted saying is that the “correct number of bikes to own is ‘n+1′, where ‘n’ is the number of bikes currently owned”. Of course there is an important corollary to this rule, which is ‘s-1′, “where ‘s’ is the number of bikes owned that would result in separation from your significant other”.

Michael S.: #AskPerformance Has the industry established a lifespan projection for carbon fiber frames and components?

There is no standardized lifespan for carbon fiber, as it will depend on how the frame or component is used. That said, there’s no reason carbon fiber can’t last for a very long time – the key is to take care of it properly, only tighten bolts to their recommended torque settings, and inspect it for wear or damage from time to time. We’ve got a great article of tips on our Learning Center: http://learn.performancebike.com/bikes/advice/how-to-guides/bikes-and-frames/taking-good-care-of-your-carbon-bike-frame

scattante_cfr_black_rearDarrell M.: When you shift gears, and the chain moves more than one gear, what is the typical cause and solution?

One main culprit could be a rear derailleur hanger that has come out of alignment – if that is bent (say from setting the bike down on its drive side), then no amount of derailleur adjustment will result in perfect shifting. Another issue could be incorrect routing of the cable to the derailleur bolt – if you’ve changed your cable lately take a look at the instructions for your derailleur to make sure you’ve got that right. If you’ve ruled out a bent hanger and poor cable routing, then you should next take a look at your rear derailleur itself – we’ve got a video in our Learning Center that covers adjusting your rear derailleur: http://learn.performancebike.com/bikes/advice/how-to-guides/bike-parts-and-components/how-to-adjust-a-rear-derailleur

Daisy L.: How many miles before a chain needs to be replaced??

A good rule of thumb is somewhere around 1,500 to 2,000 miles for a road bike, and somewhere around 5-6 months for a mountain bike (assuming that you are riding a fair amount). But these are just general guidelines – to really understand when you should replace your chain you’ll need to measure chain stretch. Chains may be metal, but over time they can actually stretch out quite a bit – we’ve got a handy video that gives you the details of what to look for: http://learn.performancebike.com/bikes/advice/how-to-guides/bike-parts-and-components/how-to-measure-bike-chain-wear

Lidia L.: What is the best way to clean your cogs ? And with what would u clean them with ? Thx ‘s

Cleaning your whole bike is one of the most important things that you can do to prolong the life of your bike and keep it running in tip-top condition (just ask any pro team mechanic). Luckily it’s not that difficult if you follow the how-to on our Learning Center, which covers everything from cleaning your rear cassette to lubing your shifters and brake levers: http://learn.performancebike.com/bikes/advice/how-to-guides/bikes-and-frames/basic-maintenance-how-to-clean-your-bike For the rear cassette, the basic technique is to spray some degreaser onto a cog brush, then wipe down each of the cogs to get the gunk off.

Howard H.: How often should I rotate my tires?

Rotating your tires front to rear is a great idea to increase the longevity of the pair, but keep in mind that most steering control, both off-road and on, comes from the front tire, while more tire wear happens with the drive forces on the rear.  So putting a road tire worn flat or a MTB tire with worn lugs on the front will lessen traction when cornering hard. To prolong the life of your tires, save some money and keep high performance traction, ride your tires until the rear is worn out, move the front tire to the rear, and put a grippy new tire on the front. Need some tips on changing tires? We can help with that: http://learn.performancebike.com/bikes/advice/how-to-guides/tires-tubes-and-wheels/how-to-change-a-road-bike-tire

_131008_dressing_for_coldEnrique L.: Just started riding my bike again like a month ago. but now that the cold weather is upon us what is the best gear for weather of around 40° which is probably the average temp he in the bay area.

The key to riding in changeable fall and winter riding conditions is dressing in layers. You want to keep your core and extremities warm when you get started, but then have the ability to remove and change layers s you get warmed up or if the temperature changes. We call this the 15 minute rule… if after 15 minutes of riding, if you’re still cold, you need more layers or warmer clothing. If you’re uncomfortably hot after 15 minutes, remove layers or wear cooler clothing. We recommend: a medium weight short sleeve base layer, bib shorts, long sleeve jersey, leg warmers, a windproof vest or jacket, windproof full-finger gloves, an ear band or beanie, and toe warmers. You can find all of our cold-weather recommendations here: http://learn.performancebike.com/bikes/advice/how-to-guides/cycling-clothing/dressing-for-the-season-essential-cycling-layering-tips

Maureen K.: A few yrs ago, I switched from riding a hybrid bike to a road bike. On the hybrid, had no problem standing up,out of saddle to get up hills. I’ve had bike fit done on road bike – it fits me sooo much better now, but I am still not comfortable standing to climb up a hill – it’s too scary for some reason! What else should I be doing to get more comfortable standing to pedal up a hill?? Thanks for any suggestions

It is quite a change going from a flat-bar road bike to a drop-bar racing bike – losing the control and leverage you got from keeping your hands in the same position on the handlebars can be disconcerting. But when you stand up to climb on a drop bar road bike, you’ll need to move your hands to your brake hoods to have the most amount of control. Once you practice riding in this position and then smoothly getting up from your saddle, you’ll become more comfortable when you really need it. If you’re looking for other tips on climbing, our Real Advice column has you covered:  http://blog.performancebike.com/2013/07/11/real-advice-an-intro-to-climbing/

Reuben C: Is there a recommended pressure for a tire(as in replacing my 120psi) with the weight of the rider and load in mind. Or are there other factors such as wheel height/length? Sorry im new to riding and it feels like i am running low on psi after bumps or a day of riding (30 miles)

Road tire pressure is definitely critical to a safe and comfortable ride – almost every tire will have a range of recommended tire pressures noted directly on its sidewall. You have flexibility within this range of pressures, so if you feel like the tire is ‘bottoming out’, or compressing so much that it hits the rim, definitely put more air in if it is within the recommendations of the manufacturer. If you are still having issues, you may need to move up to a slightly wider tire (assuming that it fits within your bike’s frame), as this will help give your ride more stability. Or you could install puncture resistant tubes to reduce the chance of pinch flats and slightly increase the load capacity of the bike. If you need help finding the tire inflation range, check out this video: http://learn.performancebike.com/bikes/advice/how-to-guides/tires-tubes-and-wheels/the-right-tire-pressure-for-a-road-bike

Donald H: Help! I tried replacing the cleats on my shoes yesterday. One bolt came out fine, but the other one ended up with the head rounded out to the point the hex wrench has nothing to grip. Any suggestions?

If you are not handy with tools, your best bet is to take the shoe to your local Performance Bicycle to have a mechanic take a look at it. If you want to try yourself (with the caveat that you might damage the sole of your shoe if you aren’t careful) use a Dremel tool with a cut-off wheel to cut a slot in the top of the cleat bolt and used a slotted-head screwdriver to remove the bolt. Be careful not to cut so deep that the bolt head breaks off. It also helps if the shaft of the screwdriver is hex-shaped, so that you can use a wrench to apply more torque to the screwdriver when removing the cleat bolt. And remember to grease your cleat bolts before installing them next time :)

Boone_Road-878Eric Q: #AskPerformance How does one determine how tight/loose to adjust one’s threadless-steerer headset?

Threadless headsets are pretty easy to get set up once you get the hang of it – the key is to tighten the top cap so that you don’t feel any movement fore and aft at the junction of the headset and the head tube, but not so tight that it hinders your turning ability. Then you tighten down the stem pinch bolts to their recommended pressure to lock the stem in place. We’ve got a very clear video that walks you through each step: http://learn.performancebike.com/bikes/advice/how-to-guides/bike-parts-and-components/how-to-adjust-a-bicycle-headset

Greg C: I have my first race coming up next week. Should I shave my legs? Does it make a difference? Will I look like a FRED if I don’t shave?

Another dilemma – shaving your legs is an age-old tradition in the cycling community. Cyclists can give you a litany of rationalizations as to why they shave (such as shaved legs make cleaning up road rash easier and quicker and promote faster healing), but when it comes down to it, shaving your legs is mainly a way to identify yourself as part of the cycling club. Think of it as an initiation into the world of bike racing – you definitely don’t have to shave, but if you don’t, you’d better be fast! We’ve got tips for taking care of your skin here: http://learn.performancebike.com/bikes/advice/riding-tips/general-cycling-tips/basic-guide-skincare-for-cyclists

Chris D: The big question. … I am 6’2 and ride cross country, all mountain and a small amount of DH. 26, 27.5 or a 29er??? It seems so hard to choose a new size with my wide range of riding styles. What is the advantage of a 27.5 vrs a 29er? Also any 2014 recommendations? I hope #askperformance can help! Sincerely a #teamperformance member.

Wow, it sounds like you’re looking for that one bike that can do it all! As a taller guy, you can definitely handle a 29er, which will give you an improved angle of attack to roll over obstacles, and more momentum to smooth out any trail. But the new 27.5″ standard might also be a great option for you – these bikes have a bit more agility than a 29er, but still have a greater ability to roll over obstacles than a classic 26″ bike. We’re pretty excited about the 27.5″ format and think that it might be a great fit for what you want to ride – we’ll have great options soon from GT (the 130mm travel Sensor and 150mm travel Force) as well as Devinci (their all-new 140mm travel Troy). Check out our Learning Center for more info about 29ers: http://learn.performancebike.com/bikes/advice/buyers-guides/bikes-and-frames/basic-guide-to-29er-mountain-bikes and 27.5″ mountain bikes: http://learn.performancebike.com/bikes/advice/buyers-guides/bikes-and-frames/basic-guide-to-275-mountain-bikes

_131003_Boone_Rky_Knob_MTB-340Dawn G.: How do I stop squeaky disc brakes? I’ve cleaned and adjusted them and they still squeak.

There are 2 main things that might be going on if you’ve got everything adjusted right – when you first install new disc brake pads, it’s essential that you go through the ‘break-in’ period for the pads. This will help improve performance and lessen annoying noise – just follow our tips here: http://learn.performancebike.com/bikes/advice/how-to-guides/bike-parts-and-components/breaking-in-your-bike-disc-brakes Of course it could just be the case that the pads have become contaminated with oil or dirt – disc brakes pads a difficult to fully clean once this happens, so often the only alternative is simply to replace the pads all together: http://learn.performancebike.com/bikes/advice/how-to-guides/bike-parts-and-components/how-to-replace-disc-brake-pads

Greg E: I am very interested in getting into cyclocross racing. What is the best way to get started racing for a mature beginner ? I already have a fuji cyclocross bike.

We’re huge fans of cross racing here in the home office – you could even say that we’re obsessed! But really what’s not to love? It’s an all-out effort for 30 minutes to an hour through grass, mud, or sand, with some barriers thrown in just for kicks. Of course this means that some different skills are needed than a regular road ride – you’re already on the right track with a dedicated cyclocross bike, but your next step is to practice cross-specific skills like quick dismounts and remounts, proper technique to carry and run with your bike, and short, hard sprinting efforts to stay in the mix at a race. We’ve got some tips you can follow on our Learning Center, but your best option to learn more is to find a local cyclocross club or training group – cross racers are a friendly bunch, and they’re usually happy to show a beginner the ropes and get him or her just as addicted to cross racing as they are: http://learn.performancebike.com/bikes/advice/riding-tips/road-cycling/cyclocross-basics

If you’ve got a cycling question that you need an answer to right away, feel free to get in touch with our Spin Doctor product technical support team – they are our team of in-house technical experts with decades of combined industry experience, ready to get you the info you need.

Call: 800-553-TECH (8324)
Email: spindoctor@performanceinc.com
Chat: Live Help at PerformanceBike.com

Real Advice: Bicycle Lights

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It’s getting to be about that time of year again, and the days are getting shorter. Believe us, we’re none too happy about it either. But just because daylight is in limited supply doesn’t mean you can’t get some riding in while the gettin’ is good. All you really need is some lights to help you see a little better and be more visible to cars and traffic. With the right lights, riding at night can add an exhilarating new dimension to familiar trails, help you extend your riding hours during the dark months, or make you feel safer on the roads.

Here’s some of their Real Advice when it comes to bike lights, courtesy of a daily commuter, a mountain biker with a fondness for night riding, and couple of roadies.

To learn more about the different types of lights, click here.

The Commuter:

One of our coworkers commutes about 12 miles on dark, unlit rural roads. There aren’t any street lamps along her route, so in addition to hi-viz, reflective clothing, she uses as many lights as possible to light her way and make herself visible.

  • Blackburn Flea 2.0 USB taillight: this rear light is very compact, lightweight, and incredibly bright with multiple flash modes. Plus, I can recharge them at my computer at work.

The Blackburn Flea 2.0 USB packs a big brightness to weight punch

  • Blackburn Mars 3 taillight: this is a very bright tail light. It has a different flash pattern than my Flea 2.0 taillight, which helps grab more motorists attention

The Mars 3 taillight is weatherproof, bright, and easy to install

  • CygoLite HotShot 2 Watt USB taillight: I have this light attached to the rear of my helmet, and I use it on its steady pattern instead of flash. The steady, high up light helps cars see me, even if their view may be partially obscured by the traffic in front of them. Like the Flea, this can be recharged on my computer at work.

The CygoLight HotShot 2 is ideal for all types of commuting

  • Blackburn Flea 2.0 USB headlight: I mount this lightweight, compact light on my left fork arm. It’s incredibly bright and has a very distinctive flash mode. Plus, I can recharge them at my computer at work.

The Blackburn Flea 2.0 can be recharged via USB and is incredibly bright

  • Axiom Flare 5 LED headlight: I mount this commuter headlight on my handlebars. It’s pretty bright, and has a great flash mode that augments the Flea 2.0. Plus, in a pinch it’s about bright enough to light my way if my headlamp battery dies.

The Axiom 5 is ideal for urban commuters, or as a secondary light on more rural roads

  • NiteRider Pro 1800 Race LED headlight: Without streetlights, you’d be surprised how dark the night can get. I use this light to illuminate the road in front of me. It has the added advantage of being as bright, if not brighter than, a car’s headlights—so it makes you pretty much unmistakable on the road. It has multiple settings, so you don’t burn through the battery or blind any motorists.

The NiteRider Pro 1800 Race puts out 1800 lumens, has multiple modes, and is ideal for rural commuting or mountain biking

The Mountain Biker:

Mountain biking is pretty big here near our offices, and hitting the trails at night is a favorite fall and winter past time. We asked one of the trail regulars at our offices what lights he uses on the technical, twisting trails in North Carolina to avoid accidents and safely navigate the trails.

  • Light and Motion Seca 750 Sport LED headlight: this light has a really nice, broad, diffuse beam pattern that gives some ambient light to the trail so you can see where you’re going. I mount this one on my handlebars so I can see where the bike is pointed.

The Seca 750 is ideal for night time mountain biking or commuting

  • NiteRider Pro 1800 headlight: This bad boy gets mounted on my helmet so I can see exactly where I’m looking. The tight, focused beam makes this light more like a spotlight that lets me look down the turns in the trails even if my bike isn’t pointed that way.

The NiteRider Pro 1800 Race makes an ideal spotlight when hitting the trails at night

The Roadies:

When heading out for some weekend road riding, it’s usually a good idea to bring a set of safety lights, even if you think you’ll be back before dark. They’re small, lightweight, and take just a few seconds to install. If they’re really heading out as it’s getting dark, they’ll usually opt for a setup similar to Mrs. Commuter.

Mr. Campagnolo:

  • Blackburn Click front and rear light: I really like these lights from Blackburn. They’re still small, but they are a little bulkier than most safety lights. But they make up for it by being much brighter than most. Plus, I like the attachment for the rear light since it faces directly backwards on the seatpost and doesn’t rub against my leg while pedaling.

The Blackburn Click fits easily a jersey pocket

Mr. SRAM:

The Axiom Zap fits easily into a pocket and is easy to install

Bike Commuting Stories

On our prior Real Advice: Commuting by Bike post, we asked readers to share their advice and stories about commuting by bike – we got such great replies that we had to share our favorite responses. Read on below to find out why folks just like you saddle up to hit the road by bike every morning, some adventures they’ve had along the way, and some hard-earned advice they learned along the way. We hope that you’ll be as inspired as we are to try riding your bike to work!

Boone_Urban

Commuter shot from our last photo shoot

From Steve H.:

When I ride a bicycle to work, I am “ready”. By car and bus my commute is 35 minutes for 9 miles, but by bicycle it takes that or less. The bike ride then becomes a challenge to beat the clock, while obeying all traffic signals. During the ride, there is little to no traffic since I leave an hour earlier than my normal commute time. Less car traffic eliminates risk, at least that is what I try to accomplish. When I get to work I am energized, focused, feel like I accomplished something, and its a conversation starter with coworkers. As a data geek, I track the route/time with MapMyRide, post it to Facebook, and review my stats (speed, time, personal records, etc….). Fun way to start the day. The afternoon flies by as I have my commute home to waiting for me. On the bike my mind drifts to work tasks, grocery list, dinner cravings, connecting with nature, watching construction progress in neighborhoods not on my normal car commute, greeting fellow bike trail riders, breathing clean air, driving the pedals up hills so I can fly through the next flat, greeting my smiling daughter upon my arrival home and answering all her questions about the ride. Life is better on a bicycle.

From Echo:

It was my first time commuting (by bike) to downtown Chicago.

I had heard rumors of Chicago becoming a bike-friendly city, but the infrastructure improvements had yet to reach my neck of the woods. So, for once, I was enjoying protected bike lanes, visible bike lane paint, and smooth roads. Sure, the typical frustrations existed here: car exhaust, drivers passing too closely, sweat pouring down my face. But, I had pedaled myself all the way downtown.

Me. My legs. My bike. While reflecting on this, empowered doesn’t even begin to describe how I felt.

Then, on the way home, I started getting tired. Doubting myself, I wondered if I had the strength to make it home. Did I make a mistake? Was it too soon? Too far beyond my abilities?

Just then, as if to confirm my fears, a truck began to turn left… On a one way… Headed right toward me. I was frozen and stared at the driver in horror. Eye contact, a turn of his wheel, and — much to my relief — he caught his mistake and didn’t run me over.

Still shaken, but relieved, I glanced to my left. A pedestrian stood at the crosswalk, with a similar look on her face. We laughed together, and she exclaimed “I was so scared!! I started waving, like ‘NO!’” while demonstrably waving her arms in the air.

Connecting with another person during a commute? Positively? That never happened while driving in my car.

I made it home just fine.

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View of Pike’s Peak and the Garden of the Gods

From Lisa P.:

How can you go wrong with a 10 mile commute to work when you know 3 miles into it you look to your left and see the magnificent Pikes Peak surrounded by the Garden of the Gods?

I feel that same guilty pleasure every time I ride that no one I work with can truly understand. I have just pedaled my way to work, gained strength, clarity, and beautiful scenery. I know my day will rock no matter what gets thrown at me. And what’s even better? I get to look forward to that same beautiful scenery, strength and clarity all the way 10 miles back home. Riding to work will clear the mind and soul, not to mention save on gas while burning some fat! It’s a shrink and a personal trainer wrapped into one awesome ride!

From Marcelo:

I would advise to use a rear carrier , panel or basket to carry your bag. I love recycling and saving money at the same time so I installed a plastic fruit case I found on a supermarket bin as a rear basket. That makes my ride easy as my back is free and doesn’t sweat.

I try to go faster and reduce the time every day, with the help of an app on my phone that tells me how I’m doing during the cycling , pace , time, speed, etc . Luckily I have shower facility at work so I can take a nice shower as soon as I arrive there. When I see my colleagues already working on their desks with their grey faces and sleepy eyes I feel like Iron Man, fresh as a lettuce and ready for action.

The common sense tells me that you have to be visible for the cars , especially in the morning when the drivers are trying to wake themselves up, so it’s extremely important to wear a reflective jacket, preferably a yellow one. Gears such as gloves and glasses are recommended too.

I hope that one day more people will realize the benefits of cycling and leave their cars for long journeys only.

northcarolinamuseumofart

Riding through the NC Museum of Art

From Joe B.:

My “real advice”, here goes, somewhat a list of do’s and don’ts: Don’t be afraid to take the long way and learn to ride fast and smart. Do leave early both ways. If your commute is in or near the suburbs, do try NOT to ride at 5pm or shortly after. There is a different energy around then which makes drivers more aggressive. Do find a park to cut through on your way home because 1) you’ll escape cars and 2) melt away any stress.

Here’s my story, in one big paragraph: I am very lucky. I have a seventeen miler one way. Only one mile of which can be fairly existential. Getting to the back side of Lake Crabtree is pretty awesome and quite a relief. Along the route I get to sprint up the dam and make the turn at the top. Still hoping to one day make it no hands. Then fly through Umstead, braking at the water fountain before heading down hill and up Reedy Creek on past the horse farms. Marking off a couple of sections to sprint. Taking a turn and going below the road through a tunnel, coming out and rounding the corner in full sprint, suddenly braking hard for spazzed bunnies. I’m now headed toward the Art Museum, riding no hands into the wind up a gentle hill. Eyeing the light and cars to make sure I’m not a jerk because I know they won’t see me for the brief moment it’s green. Then having to wait while the sun bakes and sweat drips. Finally crossing through the museum, taking the steep hill because it’s there, and then another because I have no choice. Over a humongous bridge across the freeway, down and under another tunnel. Phew, last big hill coming up. Before I know it, I’m crossing at Hillsborough and then skirting the Rose Garden, up a little hill, turning at the water tower and waiting at the bank light. Then it’s down my street, eyeing cars that pull out before looking, hoping the curb and dismounting. The best part might be saying Hi to my neighbors because I’m in a really good mood as my girl greets me at the door.

Performance Better Bicycling Community Grant: Cascade Bicycle Club

It’s been nearly a year since we identified 10 worthy organizations to receive one of the $3,000 Better Bicycling Community Grants, in honor of our 30th anniversary, so we thought that it was time to catch up with these groups to see how they’ve used the grants to make a difference in their local communities. Cascade Bicycle Club, a non-profit organization based in Seattle, Washington, used their grant to help fund Cascade’s Advocacy Leadership Institute, a group that is building the grassroots power of the bicycle movement. We asked Tarrell Wright, of Cascade Bicycle Club, to write a few words about what ALI is all about:

Cascade-Bicycle-Club“Our Better Bicycling Community Grant has enabled us to bring power to the bicycling movement by harnessing the enthusiasm of community members. With the skills and training they’ve gained through the Advocacy Leadership Institute, our first crop of Community Bicycle Advocates have gone on to testify at public hearings and start advocacy groups of their own. They’ve already become an invaluable asset to Cascade as we work toward safer, more connected communities where people of all ages and abilities can comfortably bike where they need to go.

cascade_bike_to_work“Since completing the inaugural eight-week session of our new Advocacy Leadership Institute (ALI) in July 2012, several of our first 18 Community Bicycle Advocates have gone on to lead their own campaigns, including Don Brubeck of West Seattle Bike Connections and Janet Shull of WaBiBurien. Four graduates testified in support of funding for bicycling at the City of Seattle budget hearing last October. Shannon Koller was featured in the Al Jazeera piece on bicycling in Seattle and across the nation, and Merlin Rainwater has spearheaded an initiative called Safe Routes to Health focused on engaging health care facilities and hospitals in making sure patients, visitors and staff can safely and easily walk, bike and take transit to those facilities. Glen Buhlmann started Kirkland Greenways, the first Seattle Neighborhood Greenways affiliate based outside of the city. We’ve been providing ongoing support to these advocates as they’ve continued working toward better bicycling in their communities, thanks in part to funding through this Performance Better Bicycling Community Grant.

“It’s a bit early to gauge increases in bicycling as a result of our January 2013 session, as it has only just begun. However, we succeeded in gathering more than 1,000 petition signatures for a bold and visionary Seattle Bicycle Master Plan update, and more than 5,000 people have responded to our electronic calls to action. The draft network plan includes 523 miles of bicycle facilities to be built or upgraded over the next 20 years – including cycle tracks, bike lanes, trails and family-friendly neighborhood greenways. Several ALI participants have created their own grassroots advocacy groups, engaging more than 250 community members.”

Here at Performance Bicycle, we are proud to support the work of the Cascade Bicycle Club Advocacy Leadership Institute as they continue to grow this valuable and influential program, and make a real difference to cyclists in the Seattle area.

Cycling Magazine Roundup

Can’t get enough of cycling when you’re off the bike? We know the feeling, so every month we can’t wait to check out what’s going on in the world of cycling journalism. This month we thought we’d share a few of the great stories that you might have missed in the latest cycling magazines – including ones that you can only find in print, but are worth the price of admission.

First up is a fascinating story about the Bordeaux-Paris race from 1963, won by Tom Simpson. Culled from the archives of their sister publication Cycling Weekly, the story is full of amazing race day photos  that tell the tale of this 500km long former Classic race. Riders started the race at 2am, and stopped partway through to change into their race kits on the side of the road! The strangest part of the race was that for the last 250km, the riders were paced by motorized “dernys” (gas powered scooters) – a bit like a track race out on the open road!

Next up, from the latest Bicycling magazine, is a story of a quest to get an interview with the legendary Eddy Merkcx. Apparently Merckx is still tough to catch up to, just like he was in his racing days, but this profile about the present-day Merckx reveals a man that is supremely comfortable in his role as cycling legend, yet who rarely looks back at his racing career or seeks out acclaim for his accomplishments.

In the November issue of Velo magazine, there’s a great interview with everyone’s favorite hardman cyclist, Jens Voigt, but the article that caught our eye was the ranking of the top 10 hardmen of the post-wart era (I guess you have to rule out those early cyclists who rode unpaved roads with no derailleurs – by default they would probably win any hardman contest). Our favorite tale of adversity overcome is about Fiorenzo Magni, who broke his collarbone in the middle of the 1956 Giro d’Italia (the final race of his career), yet who refused to give up even though he had to have a strip of innertube attached to his stem to stabilize his bike – the other end of which he held with his teeth!

Finally, for our fellow mountain bike riders out there, we dug the short story, “The Picashaw Pedaler”, in issue #159 of Dirt Rag magazine. The winner of their Literature Contest, this spooky tale of a sleep-deprived 24-hour racer who starts seeing a figure in the woods strikes home for anyone who’s ridden all out through the night.  Was it just a hallucination.. or was it something else?

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