4 Money Saving Bike Tips

1. Patch Your Tubes

When you get a flat, don’t just throw the tube away. Hang on to it and patch it when you get home. Patches are fairly inexpensive and can give your tube new life.

If you’re having trouble finding where the puncture is, inflate the tube and place it in a bathtub with water. The air will bubble out of the hole, allowing you to find the puncture.

We tend to pile up punctured tubes in a box, and save patching for a rainy day.

Shop here for tube patches

Click here to learn how to fix a flat

Saving and patching tubes is a good way to save money and reduce waste

Saving and patching tubes is a good way to save money and reduce waste

2. Clean Your Bike Regularly

Dirty bike parts will wear out faster, requiring more frequent replacements. It’s easier, and cheaper, to take a few minutes now and again to maintain your bike to slow part wear and improve performance.

-Never put away a dirty bike. Wipe down the frame, rims and tires after every ride

-Clean and relube your chain every 100 miles

-Do a full bike clean every other month

Click here to learn how to clean your bike

Regular cleaning can help prolong the life of components

Regular cleaning can help prolong the life of components

 

3. Learn To Do Your Own Maintenance

Full overhauls are still best done by the shop, but minor things like stem installations, brake and derailleur adjustments, and fixing a flat tire are easy to learn to do yourself.

Click here for maintenance how-to’s

Fixing small issues on your own bike is easier than you think

Fixing small issues on your own bike is easier than you think

4. Upgrade Wisely

Who doesn’t love new bike day? But sometimes you can get bigger performance gains by upgrading what you already have. New wheels or a stiffer crankset can vastly change how a bike rides and improve performance.

Click here to shop for components, click here for wheels

Click here for wheel buyer’s guide

Sometimes upgrading the bike you already have is a more cost-effective way to improve performance

Sometimes upgrading the bike you already have is a more cost-effective way to improve performance

Quick Fix: An Easy Way To Deal With Chain Slap

Mountain bikers and cyclocross riders alike will understand the difficulty of discovering chain slap marks on your beautiful new bicycle. Chain slap just happens. Especially in a sport like cyclocross where you’re tearing around dirt roads and through fields with no suspension to absorb the trail chatter. Here’s a quick fix to deal with chain slap.

Follow this quick and easy guide to get your bike all-ready to go off-road.

Note the slight grease marks on the chainstay. This is an indicator that the chain has come in contact with the stay and will eventually chip the paint off and possibly even damage the frame given enough time.

Note the slight grease marks on the chainstay. This is an indicator that the chain has come in contact with the stay and will eventually chip the paint off and possibly even damage the frame given enough time.

Step 1: find an old tube. We tend to keep a flat road tube or two around for this reason. If you don’t have one, ask around. Surely one of your riding partners has recently flatted.

Step 1: find an old tube. We tend to keep a flat road tube or two around for this reason. If you don’t have one, ask around. Surely one of your riding partners has recently flatted.

quick_fix_chainstay_03

Starting next to the valve stem, cut the tube.

Measure a length of tube about twice the length of the area of the chainstay you’re looking to protect.

Measure a length of tube about twice the length of the area of the chainstay you’re looking to protect.

Cut the tube again so now you have a piece of tube twice the length of the stay.

Cut the tube again so now you have a piece of tube twice the length of the stay.

Start by holding the tube onto the chainstay about an inch behind where you think the chain slap will start.

Start by holding the tube onto the chainstay about an inch behind where you think the chain slap will start.

Next, pass the tube around the stay (just like wrapping a drop handlebar) keeping tension on the tube.

Next, pass the tube around the stay (just like wrapping a drop handlebar) keeping tension on the tube.

quick_fix_chainstay_08

Keep tension on the tube as you pass it around the stay over and over so the tube just overlaps itself.

Keep going until you’re just short of the front derailleur cage, or just beyond where you think the chain will be impacting the stay.

Keep going until you’re just short of the front derailleur cage, or just beyond where you think the chain will be impacting the stay.

Back up just a hair and cut the tube at an angle.

Back up just a hair and cut the tube at an angle.

Finish it off with a little black electrical tape for a nice clean look.

Finish it off with a little black electrical tape for a nice clean look.

Ta-da! Now your chain is protected and you can feel good about recycling that old flat tube.

Ta-da! Now your chain is protected and you can feel good about recycling that old flat tube.

If this is just too much work for you or you don’t have access to any flat tubes, Lizard Skins makes a great ready-to-go chainstay wrap.

Is there anything else you’d like to see a quick and easy fix for? Ask us in the comments section below and we’ll add it to the list. Thanks!

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