Real Advice: Setting Up Your Trainer Room

trainer-image

1. Pick the Room

Even trainers that claim to be “ultra-quiet” are still going to generate enough noise to annoy someone in an adjacent room. Pick a room that’s separated from others in the house, such as a basement, garage, or spare bedroom. Make sure you have room to set up the trainer and angle it toward your entertainment of choice. And remember folks—make sure that floor is level-ish. An uneven floor can make the trainer rock, putting a ton of stress on your hips (no good) and the bike frame (really no good).

 

2. Sweat Catching

Since you’re not going to be riding anywhere, there will be no air moving on you. That means you’re going to sweat more. To avoid ruining the carpet or hardwood, set up a trainer mat or towel underneath your bike. To avoid ruining your bike (specifically the headset and BB bearings), use a sweat catcher or hang a towel over your bike.

Using a sweat net or towel can help preserve the life of your compoents

Using a sweat net or towel can help preserve the life of your compoents

3. Cooling

Since riding the trainer gets super-hot, it’s a good idea to set up a fan to keep from overheating. Even a cheap mini tabletop fan can make a world of difference. Using a fan doesn’t preclude following Step 2—you’re still going to sweat like a demon.

 

Not sure what kind of trainer to get? Check out our guide.

 

4. Entertainment

Riding the trainer with nothing to do can get really, really boring really, really fast. Make sure you have a TV, tablet, or computer to watch a movie or do a structured work out.

PRO TIP: Since there trainer is loud and you’ll have a fan running, if you’re in a domestic living situation or have housemates, it is generally considered polite to invest a couple of bucks in a headphone extension cord or some wireless headphones so you’re not tempted to crank the TV volume.

Using headphones can help maintain domestic harmony

Using headphones can help maintain domestic harmony

5. At Hand

Set up a stool or some medium height shelves next to your bike. It should be at about a height where you can reach it comfortable while seated in the saddle. This will ensure that your remotes, computer mouse, gels, spare water bottle, spare towel, etc… are all easily at hand.

 

6. Be Prepared

The trainer is usually more demanding than an outdoor workout. Not only do you have the increased resistance of the unit itself, but heat buildup and a tough structured workout can really take it out of you. For an hour long trainer session, you should have 3 water bottles (2 of them filled a hydration drink) and some gels to keep your energy levels up and avoid dehydration.

 

Winter Cross

Some days, you just have to ride. This past weekend, Performance employees David, Chris and Devlin outfitted their Scattante XRL Cross and Scattante Titanium Cross bikes with metal-studded tires (why not) and hit the trails for their “Worst Day of the Year” ride.

Read more of this post

Spin Doctor Tech Tip – Winter Commuting

This is our second installment about winter riding, The Commute.

Chris' commuter bike

So what’s happened to your New Years resolution, “No more winter blob and blahs for me”?  Yes, you promised yourself to start riding earlier this year… and you even rode on New Years day!

But then the excuses started:

It’s cold! It’s dark!

There’s snow and ice on the roads!

There isn’t enough daylight!

I’ve got too much work to do!

There’s an “I Dream of Jeannie” marathon on TV!

That extra 15lbs makes me look cuddly!

We have a simple solution to all of these laments: bicycle commute to work! Read more of this post

Spin Doctor Tech Tip – The Cold, Hard Truth About the Cold

Face it. Summer is gone. The colder temperatures of fall are moving in, daylight savings is lurking just around the corner, and, if you’re like me, stepping out of a warm bed and into the cold morning is not the ideal way to wake up. All drama aside, riding my bike is simply too much fun to have to give it up for months at a time. So, what’s the best way to keep riding? Personally, it comes down to simply making the time to get on the bike, even if it’s only for a quick 45 minutes on the trail. Sure, I’d love to spend 2-3 hours out there, but I find that a little time on the bike beats no time on the bike, hands down.

Here at the Performance Bike office, we have an ideal situation for cyclists where riding during the lunch hour is encouraged and supported. We’ve got lockers, showers, tools, and even bike stands in the office.  It’s a great culture, but, sadly, one that does not really exist outside of the bike industry. Finding the time to ride is half the battle, and that’s ultimately going to depend on your schedule. Read more of this post

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