5 Ways To Stay Warm On Cold Rides

Here we go again…looks like the Polar Vortex decided to show up early this year. We don’t know about you, but we refuse to ride the trainer before Thanksgiving. So long as we don’t get one of our famous, downhome Carolina Ice Storms, we’ll keep riding outside.

Now, you wouldn’t think a bunch of Southerners would know much about riding in the cold, but most of us actually grew up riding, training and racing in places like Vermont, Chicago, Pennsylvania, and Portland (Oregon, not Maine– which is a whole other animal), so we’ve learned a few things over the years about riding in the wet, the cold, and the snow.

So here it is: 5 Ways To Stay Warm on Cold Rides.

1. Layer Up

Using layered cycling clothing can help you adjust your temperature to suit the ride and the conditions. You can pretty much layer every part of your clothing system as the conditions warrant, from your feet all the way to your head. Click here for our guide to layering.

PRO TIP #1: No matter how well you think you’ve layer up on top, always bring a wind jacket or vest with you in case conditions take a turn for the worse. #1B is to bring some knee warmers on super cold days– if your knees get cold you can put them on over (but preferably under) your tights for extra coverage.

PRO TIP #2: Spare arm warmers, spare gloves or liners, a spare hat, and base layer can pack up small in a plastic bag that fits easily into a jersey pocket. On long rides, it gives you the option of changing out sweaty, damp garments for warm, dry ones.

PRO TIP #3: Don’t use super thick cycling socks with your cycling shoes. Instead, layer your overshoes as needed, putting insulated ones closer to the foot, covered by wind/waterproof ones.

Layering up is a great way to make sure you can a stay warm, and adjust your core temperature as you go

Layering up is a great way to make sure you can a stay warm, and adjust your core temperature as you go

2. Hot Water Bottle

Using an insulated water bottle filled with some warm tea or Skratch Labs Apples and Cinnamon hydration mix (which is absolutely delicious, by the way) can take the edge off a very cold ride. This is a tip that the pro’s use during early season races like Milan-San Remo to stay warm (check out a video here)

Make like the pro's, and use some warm tea to hydrate on your winter rides

Make like the pro’s, and use some warm tea to hydrate on your winter rides (Orica-GreenEdge)

3. Eat Enough

In the winter, you burn more calories on the bike than during the summer. Not only are you using fuel to exercise, but also to stay warm. That means that during the winter you should fuel up with a healthy breakfast like oatmeal, and then bring plenty of bars, chews or gels to eat while riding. This will give you plenty of carbs to keep your body warm and prevent the dreaded bonk—which could mean serious trouble if you’re far from home on a cold winter’s day.

Eating a solid, healthy breakfast, and having plenty of food for the ride will help prevent you bonking

Eating a solid, healthy breakfast, and having plenty of food for the ride will help prevent you bonking

4. Mix In Intervals

If you’re really feeling the cold, trying mixing in some intervals to bring up your body temperature. You can either 1) pick a target a good distance away and ride as hard as you can until you reach it, or 2) go by time, and ride as hard as you can for about a minute. Just make sure you don’t go so hard that you start sweating a lot, which can just make the problem worse.

Riding a few hard intervals is a great way to get your body temperature back up

Riding a few hard intervals is a great way to get your body temperature back up

5. Take a Rest

We usually like to plan our long, meandering winter rides with a destination in mind—usually a restaurant or café with warm drinks and food. But it’s OK to take a break at any time if you’re feeling cold, chilled, or just tired. Stop at a gas station, coffee shop, café, whatever, warm up and take a breather.

Go in and get warm, grab some hot tea or coffee, and eat a cookie.

PRO TIP #1: If you’re feeling the chill from a damp clothing, you can use your rest stop to change into your spare base layer, spare gloves or liners, and hat. That way you can go back out into the cold feeling dry and warm.

PRO TIP #2: If your toes are feeling very cold on your ride, see if you can get some aluminum foil or a foil food wrapper, and wrap up your toes. It’s not the most comfortable thing, but it does provide some additional insulation.

PRO TIP #3: Ask if the coffee shop or restaurant can refill your water bottles with hot water.

When you start feeling cold or chilled, go ahead and head indoors to warm up

When you start feeling cold or chilled, go ahead and head indoors to warm up

Build A Fall Cycling Wardrobe

fall-clothing-essentials

The weather isn’t cold….yet. But it’s getting there. Which means that now is the time to get your cycling wardrobe ready for the change. After all, fall is probably the best time to ride, and you don’t want to be stuck inside on that first beautifully cool day because you don’t have the right clothes.

The key to riding in fall is versatility through layering. Since the day can start off cold but heat up later, layers of clothing allow you to start the ride warm, then shed the small, easily packable outerlayers as you ride.

 

Here are 7 Fall Clothing Essentials:

 

1. Arm and Leg Warmers

These are probably the most versatile items in the cyclist’s arsenal. Warmers can help extend the temperature range of your shorts and jerseys well down into the 50’s and 60’s…lower if you run hot. Pair them with a vest or jacket to get even more versatility.

 

Arm warmers may be the most versatile clothing option you have

Arm warmers may be the most versatile clothing option you have

2. Vest

The vest is probably the second most versatile item you can own. Wear it over a short sleeve jersey when the day starts cool, pair with arm and leg warmers on colder days, or bring it along to layer over a jacket if the weather really turns.

They’re so light, offer so much protection, and roll up so small, there’s no reason not to bring it with you on every fall ride.

 

The vest is a close second. Small, packable, and protective

The vest is a close second. Small, packable, and protective

3. Jacket

As awesome as the vest and warmers are, they can only take you so far into the season. At some point, you’ll need some more protection. Fall isn’t quite thermal softshell territory yet (save the big guns for winter), but a thermal jacket can help you stay warmer as we get into later October and early November.

 

A wind jacket is essential as it gets later into the season

A wind jacket is essential as it gets later into the season

4. Full Finger Gloves

Keep those digits warm. There’s nothing worse on a ride than having cold fingers (except for maybe cold feet). So keep them warm by wearing some good, full finger gloves. A decent long finger glove can keep your fingers warm in brisk weather, without all the insulation you usually need in a big winter glove.

 

Full finger gloves offer plenty of protection without bulk

Full finger gloves offer plenty of protection without bulk

5. Baselayer

A baselayer serves two purposes in fall: 1) it gives you a little bit of extra warmth for cooler days—which can be a real blessing on cold mornings, and 2) it helps wick away sweat. The second part is important, because fall days can have you feeling too hot one minute, and too cold the next, so the baselayer helps control your core temperature.

 

Baselayers help control your core temperature, to keep you warm without overheating

Baselayers help control your core temperature, to keep you warm without overheating

6. Toe Covers

Since cycling shoes are usually the closest fitting shoes most people have, there’s not enough room to wear a thicker wool sock. Instead, most cyclists opt for the overshoe or toe warmers to keep their feet warm on cooler rides. The big advantage of toe warmers is that they don’t completely cover all the vents, so your foot can still vent some extra heat. If the day really warms up, they’re small enough to fit easily in a jersey pocket.

 

Toe covers keep toes warm, but are easy to remove and pack down small

Toe covers keep toes warm, but are easy to remove and pack down small

7. Headband

This is an ear saver when rides start on cooler mornings. It helps keep the cold wind off your forehead and ears, but doesn’t make you overheat like a full skullcap might. As the ride rolls on and the day warms up, you can just pull over and take it off. They roll up so tiny you might even lose it in your jersey pocket afterwards.

 

The headband is an excellent item for early morning starts

The headband is an excellent item for early morning starts

 

Did we miss any essentials? Let us know in the comments.

Ridden and Reviewed: Sugoi RP Ice Jersey and Sugoi RP Bib Shorts

The Sugoi RS Ice jersey and RP bib shorts are excellent for hot days

The Sugoi RP Ice jersey and RP bib shorts are excellent for hot days

With a Southern summer in full swing around our offices in North Carolina, we’re always looking for new ways to stay cool on our lunch rides. Riding in the heat of the day, when June temps can reach 95 with 90% humidity can really take it out of you, especially if you wear the wrong clothes.

While some of the new mesh climbing jerseys are great, on really sunny days we still want something that will keep us from getting a sunburn. So when the clothing guys showed us our new Sugoi RP Ice jersey and RP bib shorts– available exclusively from Performance Bicycle– we figured we’d test it out to see if it actually works.

The racy pro-fit provides plenty of compression mixed with all-day comfort

The racy pro-fit provides plenty of compression mixed with all-day comfort

 The Jersey

The RS Ice jersey uses Icefil technology to reflect infared light and keep you cooler

The RP Ice jersey uses Icefil technology to reflect infared light and keep you cooler

The idea behind the jersey is that it uses Icefil technology that helps block thermal infared light (the kind that makes you feel hot) and wicks away sweat to speed evaporative cooling. It also has a Xylitol fabric treatment that generates a cooling effect when it comes into contact with moisture, helping to draw away some heat. Sugoi claims that it will keep you cooler, even though the jersey has significantly fewer mesh panels than comparable hot-weather jerseys.

The big thing we noticed about the jersey is how remarkably light it feels. In fact, it feels about as light as some breezy, sunburn-prone mesh jerseys we have. The light feeling goes a long way towards how cool the jersey feels on a hot day.

The day we took the jersey out was about 96 F with 89% humidity. It was the kind of day when you start feeling like an egg on a skillet the minute you walk outside. The RP Ice jersey was more than equal to the ride though. The first thing we noticed immediately was that the fabric didn’t feel like it was soaking up heat in the sun. Normally you can just feel a jersey getting hot, but the jersey felt fairly cool while just sitting in the sun waiting for everyone else in the ride to show up.

Active vent side panels help shed body heat that builds up inside the jersey

Where we really noticed the cooling effect was while riding. Usually our test day would have been an open-jersey ride, but we stayed pretty much zipped up during most of the ride (except for the long climb) without feeling like we were overheating or suffocating. While we did kind of miss feeling of airflow you get from some thinner jerseys, we found we didn’t really need it. The Sugoi jersey was plenty breathable, and wicked away sweat really well and dried very fast, so we didn’t get that wet towel feeling.

The jersey has a locking zipper, and back pockets that give you plenty of room to store tubes, tools, food and a phone.

The RP Ice jersey also features a pro-fit, which means it will be a tight, aerodynamic cut. Our tester found he probably could have gone down a jersey size as well, but that could vary depending on your body type. The body-hugging, contoured fit actually felt really nice, without the cloying, clingy feeling you sometimes get from jerseys that fit like this.

A big reflective stripe on the back helps you stay visible

A big reflective stripe on the back helps you stay visible

The Shorts

As great as jersey’s are, it’s the shorts that can really make or break a kit, since that’s the part actually contacting the saddle. The Sugoi RP shorts feature an excellent molded, multi-density chamois pad, which is perfect for longer rider with plenty of padding. It provided plenty of padding in all the right places, especially on the sit bones, which can sometimes be an issue—given our tester’s preference for minimally padded saddles.

The Sugoi RP shorts provide plenty of comfort and support during hard efforts and long days

The Sugoi RP shorts provide plenty of comfort and support during hard efforts and long days

The lycra is a little bit heavier than we were expecting, but actually breathes quite well. The material also provided plenty of compression, without feeling overly constrictive—it felt like it was giving our muscles support, which actually felt really great toward the end of our ride when we started to feel a little fatigued. The leg gripper has a really solid feel, and stayed in place no matter how much we sweated, even when our sunscreen started to run off.

The Verdict

The Sugoi RP Ice jersey and RP shorts are definitely a go-to summer combo.

The Sugoi RP jersey, as far as cooling goes, is right up there with some of the best summer-weight jersey’s we’ve tried, with the added bonus that it provides a lot more sun protection. It’s definitely one a good one for hot, sunny days, when not just overheating, but getting sunburned can be an issue.

The shorts are very comfortable, with a good mix of compression and support, and a pretty solid (not literally) chamois. We found them to be pretty ideal for rides of any length– be it a short hour-long hammer ride where the compression can help prevent fatigue, or a longer weekend ride where the chamois can prevent soreness and keep you comfortable.

The Sugoi jersey and shorts are also available in a women’s version, available here.

The Sugoi RS Ice jersey and RP shorts will help you perform you best on hot days

The Sugoi RP Ice jersey and RP shorts will help you perform you best on hot days

Performance Ultra SL Jersey and Shorts Review

Riding cobbles is kind of the ultimate test for not only a rider, but for their equipment. It’s a crucible that tests everything from the bike to clothing. If any piece of gear isn’t up to par, you’re in for one miserable day on the bike.

When we headed to Belgium to ride the Ronde van Vlaanderen Cyclo gran fondo, which included several cobbled sections and four cobbled climbs, we knew we would need some great bikes—which Ridley graciously supplied us for the day, but it also struck us as the ultimate proving ground for our new Performance Ultra SL bib shorts and the Ultra jersey. Ultra is Performance’s line of performance-oriented clothing, designed for riders who expect the very best from their clothing, in all circumstances. If it could survive a day on the cobbles, then it was certainly ready for the prime time back at home.

The new Ultra kit is an evolution of last year’s break out redesign of the Ultra line, and is engineered to be lighter, fit better, and help you perform better on the bike. Constructed using our Physiodynamic design, made with lighter weight Eschler fabrics, coldblack treatment, and Aerocool technology to help you stay cooler and perform better, this pair of short and jersey are designed for long hard days. The all-new SL shorts feature a less bulky chamois, a finer mesh on the upper for better breathability, and a slimmer cut than the standard Ultra shorts.

The Jersey

Our first impression of the newly redesigned Ultra jersey was that it is unbelievably airy and light. On our ride to the ride, we actually needed a jacket in addition to our usual baselayer and arm warmers, because the jersey held in so little heat. The Aerocool fabric is definitely that—cool. In fact, the faster you ride, the more it seems to suck air in and channel it under the jersey. The fabric has an almost silky feel to it that wasn’t clingy like some other jersey’s we’ve tried. The high collar is a nice touch, since a sun burned neck is something we’re usually keen to avoid on long rides, and the arm bands were a fan favorite. As cyclists we’ve generally let our arms wither away to nothing, so it was nice to find a jersey that had sleeves that actually felt snug around our arms. The fabric was a little on the stiff side, but it seemed to loosen up a little as the day went on.

Performance Ultra kit at the Tour of Flanders

Riding in the Ultra kit at the Tour of Flanders Cyclo

The locking zipper was also a nice feature. The day we rode the Ronde Cyclo ended up being fairly hot and sunny, so it was crucial to be able to easily open up the jersey to get more air, especially on the longer climbs.

Another nice benefit we noticed was the bellowed rear pockets. One of them is apparently sweatproof, but we didn’t know that at the time, and didn’t get an opportunity to test it. The pockets proved more than able to pack in everything we needed for a long day. We filled ours up with 2 tubes, multitool, tire levers, mini pump, iPhone, wallet, packable jacket, 3 gels, 2 stroop waffles,  and a route card, and we still had plenty of room. One of the real tests—and one seldom mentioned—for a jersey though is how well it performs with fully loaded pockets. Many race-fit jerseys feel great until you load up the pockets, and then they just end up stretching and drooping as the day goes on. The Ultra jersey though seems to have hit that sweet spot of being light enough to keep you cool, but with enough structure in the back panels to keep the pockets from sagging or bouncing around as you ride. Definitely a solid touch.

The Shorts

As great as a jersey is, the shorts are really the center piece of any clothing line, and if they aren’t up to snuff, you’re in big trouble. Especially when riding on cobbles, which feels a little like riding a bike with a jackhammer for a seatpost. We were a little apprehensive about riding a new shorts that we’d never before worn before – hoping against hope the chamois would be worthy of the challenge. It turns out that we had nothing to worry about!

The TMF Skyve chamois found in the Ultra SL shorts was more than equal to the cobbles. Normally this reviewer is not a big fan of multi-density pads—it’s just a personal preference, but in this case it was exactly what the doctor ordered. The different densities did a really a fine job of soaking up what could have been some…ummm…uncomfortable cobble hits. We definitely knew we were riding over the rough stuff, there’s only so much your shorts and bike can do, but we shudder to think what it would have been like with a lesser chamois. And the pad didn’t just excel in the cobbles either—we spent about 5 hours in the saddle that day, and never had a single complaint. No chaffing, no rubbing, no issues. At no point did we ever really think about the chamois—which is one of the highest compliments you can give to a pair of shorts. If you don’t notice them, they are doing their job.

Peformance Ultra Kit

Testing the Ultra kit in Belgium

The overall construction was also really nice. The contoured Eschler gridded fabric construction moved easily with us, and provided a nice snug fit without too much compression, or the ever-irritating stretching out that sometimes happens. The leg band was nice and snug, and held the shorts in place—even when wearing knee warmers, which is fairly unusual.

The Verdict

The Ultra jersey and Ultra SL shorts were definitely the right tools for the job. The distinctive styling didn’t have us feeling out of place amongst the ever well-dressed Europeans, while the high performance features kept us comfortable and helped us ride well during one of the toughest rides we’ve ever done.

Testing the Ultra kit at the Tour of Flanders Cyclo

Our testers at the finish of the Tour of Flanders Cyclo

Whether you’re racing or going for a longer-distance ride, the kit provides a nice aerodynamic fit that can help you gain an advantage in the paceline, and had all the comfort features you would want for long distances.

Now that we’re home, this is definitely a kit we’ll be reaching for again for some other adventures we have coming up…so check back for more soon.

Check out our all new digital Spring Clothing Catalog to see more spring clothing from Performance Bicycle.

3 Tips For Getting A Friend Into Cycling

 

2010_0ldlystraride

We all know how awesome it is to be a cyclist—but sometimes it’s nice to share the love. Many cyclists have tried valiantly over the last century or so to turn their friends and loved ones into members of our community, with varying degrees of success. It can be done, but it needs to be done with care—push it too hard, and it could backfire.

Here are a few simple tips to help get your loved one into the 2-wheeled lifestyle.

 

1. Keep It Accessible

There’s nothing cyclists love more than geeking out about gear and numbers—but you want to avoid making things sound harder or more complicated than they really are. Keep it simple, easy, and accessible.

Here are some common errors to avoid:

  • Resist the temptation to go all-out with gear, and focus more on what they want instead of what you think they need. Example: if they don’t feel comfortable in lycra cycling wear, try turning them onto more relaxed gear like apparel from Club Ride or Performance.
  • Don’t push them into getting a super aggressive or racy bike (at least not at first). The bike they pick should be one they like and feel comfortable on.
  • Don’t push the use of clipless pedals, aerobars, or other things like that at first. Wait until they get more confidence on the bike.

As they get more into it, hopefully all that stuff will come with time. But to start, just keep things simple. Here are a few additional tips, from our Learning Center.

 

Casual cycling apparel offers many of the performance benefits of lycra gear for the beginning cyclist

 

2. Make It Fun

Don’t just get them hooked up with a bike and a helmet, and expect them to go out and ride. When you’re just getting into cycling, it helps to have someone who can encourage and guide you on your journey. Ride together and get out and have fun. But tread carefully here, my friend.

If you try and drag your friend or significant other on long rides or push the pace too hard, you risk making them think cycling is too hard. You want cycling to be remembered as something fun and a respite from every day worries, not something that they had to suffer through.

Try picking short scenic routes or a bike path to start with, and ride at a pace where you can talk and hold a conversation. If you find yourself unconsciously pushing the pace harder, try riding in the little chainring, which will act as a hobble and prevent you from riding too fast.

 

Centralia, WA

Remember to have fun out there. Organized events and fun rides, like charity rides or fund raisers, are a great way to introduce new riders to the sport.

 

3. Prioritize Safety

Even if you get everything else right, it will all be for naught if your your new cycling buddy doesn’t feel safe on the bike. And feeling safe on the bike is very important. While most experienced riders have the bike handling skills and experience to ride in traffic with cars zooming by, it can be a scary experience for newer cyclists. To start, pick routes with little traffic and lower speed limits, or head for the bike path. Also try riding during off-peak hours, so there will be less traffic. And remember, if they express any concerns or fears, don’t scoff or dismiss them as unfounded. Try and accommodate their concerns as much as possible, so they’ll have the confidence to go riding again.

For more information, check out our article about riding defensively.

Riding on a bike path or low-traffic street is a good way to help beginner cyclists feel safe

Riding on a bike path or low-traffic street is a good way to help beginner cyclists feel safe

 

Did we miss anything? If you have any tips for helping someone get into riding, feel free to share in the comments section.

Custom Cycling Clothing from Champion System and Performance Bicycle

14PB_02_Champ_Sys_Landing

We are happy to announce that we have partnered with Champion System, a worldwide leader in custom technical apparel, to offer custom cycling clothing through PerformanceBike.com. Our partnership with Champion System allows us to offer high quality, great looking cycling clothing for your team or club, or even for individuals who want their own unique kits. Basically, if you can dream it up, Champion System can make it happen!

The custom clothing option is available on PerformanceBike.com and Champion System will facilitate the process, from design through delivery. Champion System offers cycling and triathlon custom apparel, as well as a full line up of casual technical apparel and accessories. All items are available through our custom order page on PerformanceBike.com.

*Please note – custom clothing orders do not qualify for Team Performance points and all returns must be handled through Champion System directly.

Customization

Start with a blank canvas and customization options are endless – from colors to styles to design.

Later this month we will be hosting a “Design a Jersey Contest” where we will showcase the possibilities of Champion System custom clothing on PerformanceBike.com. The public will vote for a winner from the top designs – the winner will then receive a copy of their jersey design to ride in and see their winning design offered as a Limited Edition Performance Bicycle Summer Jersey available at PerformanceBike.com. We’ll post more details of this contest soon – but start sketching out your jersey designs now!

Top 10 Things For 2014

This year saw a lot of innovation, but coming out of all the trade shows, blogs, and our own meetings, there are a few things that really stand out and have us all kinds of excited for 2014. But these are just our thoughts – post a comment below with what cycling gear or rides you’re most pumped to try out in the new year!

1. Disc brakes on road bikes: we’ve had a chance to play around with these a little bit lately, and we’re excited about the performance advantages we’ve seen so far. Hopefully, we’ll see more manufacturers offer a bigger range of bikes with disc brakes.

IMG_0814

We love the performance of disc brakes on the Diamondback Century Sport Disc

2. 1×11 drivetrains for MTB: Who knew that losing a front derailleur could be an improvement? OK, so many folks have already gone down this path of simplicity, but the improved gearing range of 1×11 makes it a possibility for almost any mountain biker. They’ve proven to be a reliable, durable and quiet – we can’t wait to see it come stock on even more bikes. SRAM’s XX1 and (more affordable) X01 systems are the only one’s available right now, but you can go part way towards this system with a ‘narrow-wide’ single front chainring to ditch the front derailleur on your current bike.

We love the new crop of 1×11 MTB drivetrains

3. Hydraulic brakes for the road: The unfortunate SRAM recall aside, we’re excited about the potential for improved braking power. The idea is there, and the applications and benefits are obvious, it just looks like it needs more refining. We’ve been using the TRP HY/RD mechanically actuated hydraulic system the last few weeks, and are pretty impressed, so we’re looking forward to more innovation in 2014.

TRP Hy/Rd mechanically actuated hydraulic brake calipers drastically improve braking performance

TRP Hy/Rd mechanically actuated hydraulic brake calipers drastically improve braking performance

4. SRAM electronic drivetrains: Hey, we’re suckers for new technology! Spotted at the Illinois State CX Championships, it looks like SRAM is finally set to introduce an electronic shifting system to compete with the tried and true systems from Shimano and Campagnolo. Since SRAM seems to like names like “New Red” and “New Red 22″, anyone want to venture a guess about the product name? Click here to learn more from Bike Radar.

5. 27.5” wheels: 27.5″ (aka 650B) wheels on mountain bikes were huge this year, and we bet that next year they’ll gain even more prominence as more folks upgrade their rides. As a mountain biker you owe it to yourself to test out one of these ‘in-between’ bikes if you’re in the market for a new off-road steed – they really do combine some of the best traits of a nimble 26″ bike and a roll-over-anything 29er.

27.5″ wheeled mountain bikes, like this GT Force Carbon, were all the rage this year

6. Giro Air Attack Shield helmets (black, size medium): Literally the only thing on my Christmas list and I didn’t get one. Hopefully one will find it’s way to me in 2014. They make a great Valentine’s Day gift (and that’s a science fact, you guys). But seriously – aero bikes, components and gear will continue to make inroads into more every day rides. It’s free speed with very little trade-off when it comes to weight or comfort.

Maybe next year…

7. New power meter designs: The Garmin Vector and our new completely awesome, formerly super secret wheel project are making power readouts more accessible to cyclists, improving the way we ride and train. Hopefully, the designs will continue to get more affordable and easier to install.

Innovative new power meter designs are bringing power to the masses

8. Fat bikes: Fat bikes are the new fixies, but more fun. Want to experience a trail in a new way? Power through snow? Roll over boulders like it ain’t no thang? Then you need a fat bike – if you have never tried one, then you’ll be blown away by how much fun they are!

Go anywhere on a fat bike. Seriously…you can pretty much go anywhere.

9. Some exciting new stuff added to our bike and clothing lineups: We’ve got some awesome new stuff getting ready to fill up our bike inventory, including some exciting new brands. We can’t say what yet, but we’re really excited. And our clothing team is hard at work improving our already amazing high-value Performance brand apparel – we think you’re going to like what you see!

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More great Performance gear is on the way.

10. More great rides with friends: Whether it’s a lunch time hammerfest with coworkers at the office, an epic Gran Fondo, a ride with the family, or a leisurely weekend excursion with your best riding buddy – we’re here for the ride, and we hope that 2014 brings all of us even more great adventures on 2 wheels!

climbing_3

Here’s to great rides in 2014!

6 Cycling Gloves for Cold Weather Rides

Now that cold weather has rolled in across much of the country, cyclists everywhere turn to that most common of riding refrains: “My fingers are frozen!” The best way to avoid chilly digits on your ride is to wear long-fingered gloves, so we turned to our clothing team for recommendations of our best and most popular cold weather riding gloves. Of course what you choose to wear will depend on the forecast and your cold tolerance, just like our clothing suggestions for riding in cold weather – but read on below for a few great frost-fighting options (and don’t forget to get your bike ready for cold weather rides too).

winter_gloves_list

1. Smartwool Liner Gloves: Sometimes all you need is a lightweight liner glove to bring you through the cooler season in comfortable warmth, but these gloves are multi-purpose since they are also perfect as an extra insulating layer under your favorite gloves or mittens (and as a barrier if you are using chemical warmers layered inside your gloves).

2. Fox Women’s Digit Gloves: Mountain bike riders have an advantage in cooler weather since they already wear long finger gloves, but don’t be afraid to break out your ‘mountain bike’ gloves on a chilly road ride – just pick a pair that aren’t super-lightweight, like this stylish option from Fox.

3. Pearl Izumi Cyclone Gloves: Pearl Izumi’s most popular, cool weather cycling gloves offer great fit and protection, while adding reflectivity for safety and Comfort Bridge Gel padding for comfort. Elite Softshell is a highly functional stretch fabric that offers windproof, waterproof, thermal and breathable protection for cold weather performance.

4. Louis Garneau Super Prestige Gloves: Ergonomically designed to maximize hand comfort in cold conditions with windproof, waterproof and thermal fabrics, pre-curved fingers and gel padding in the palm. The ‘lobster’ design provides more warmth than full-fingered cycling gloves and better mobility than mittens, but on these gloves you can actually fold back the ‘lobster’ covering to turn them into standard 5-finger gloves.

5. Castelli Diluvio Gloves: Take the warmth of mittens and combine it with the weatherproof properties of neoprene and you have Castelli’s Diluvio gloves. Thermo-sealed, 3mm neoprene construction thwarts wind and rain, plus it’s insulated for amazing heat retention. Thin, flexible design fits easily over your hands and gripper palm improves handlebar control.

6. Belgian Gloves: Only recommended if you are cycling ‘hardman’ like Jens Voigt or Tom Boonen.

Real Advice: Dressing For The Fall

Today we continue with our Real Advice series – hard-earned practical knowledge from real riders here at our home office. This week we hear from a team member who has a special fondness for some late season riding.

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My favorite days to ride are October or November days when I wake up, look outside and see grey skies. Of course I love getting in some good riding in warm, sunny weather, but there’s something about the solitude of those overcast days that really makes me remember why I love this sport. Maybe it’s the loneliness of the road, maybe I ride better in lower temperatures, maybe I just really look forward to that post-ride pumpkin-flavored carbohydrate recovery beverage that’s only available at this particular time of year. Who knows. What is for certain though is that without dressing right for the weather, those rides would not be nearly so enjoyable.

When it comes to dressing for the fall, there are two things to keep in mind: layers and versatility. Dressing in layers not only helps keep you warmer by trapping air between the layers, but it also lets you more effectively manage exactly how hot you get by allowing you to remove layers as the day warms up. It also helps if your clothing options are versatile, and able to be combined in different ways to adapt to the conditions. It’s not unusual for me to start off a fall ride at 6AM dressed in several layers of clothes, only to return home at 2 in the afternoon in shorts and jersey with my pockets stuffed with warmers and jackets.

So, if you’re ready to get on the fall riding gravy train (with carbon fiber wheels, of course), then follow this handy dandy guide to dressing for the fall.

DRESSING FOR THE FALL

1.    FALL ESSENTIALS:

  • Shorts and Jersey: I continue to ride in my usual bib shorts and short sleeve jerseys well into the fall. When combined with the below listed items, this is the foundation of a versatile riding kit that can adapt to almost any weather condition.
Shorts and jersey are a good foundation for the fall

Shorts and jersey are a good foundation for the fall

  • Base Layer: invest in a long and a short sleeve or sleeveless base layer. Base layers are worn under the jersey (and under bib straps, if you wear bib shorts) and add an extra light layer that can help keep you warm, while moving sweat away from your skin—essential for hot or cold weather. I personally prefer merino wool base layers for fall riding, since they keep you warm, but won’t make you overheat if the day ends up warmer than you think.

A base layer will help keep you warm and wick away sweat

  • Arm and Knee/Leg warmers: warmers are usually a better option this time of year than long sleeve jerseys or tights. Good ones are usually just as effective as tights or a long jersey, but they have the added advantage of being removable as the day warms up—plus they roll up small enough to be stuffed into a jersey pocket for storage
Arm, leg or knee warmers can keep you warm and are easily removed if you get too hot

Arm, leg or knee warmers can keep you warm and are easily removed if you get too hot

  • Vest: a good wind vest is essential for this time of year. It helps keep your core warm, and most of them will block the wind pretty well. If you’re really pushing it hard, you can always unzip a bit to get more air moving. Like warmers, these have the advantage of being removable and low bulk, so they can be easily stored in a pocket if necessary.

A wind vest will help keep your core warm

  • Long Finger Gloves: For most riders, long finger gloves are essential. Cold fingers become stiff and lethargic, which is bad news since as cyclists we depend on our fingers to operate the brakes and shift mechanisms, so keeping them warm is essential. Don’t go for heavy insulated gloves or ones with WindStopper material though, as these are usually too warm for this time of year, and you’ll just end up with sweat-soaked gloves that may chill your fingers even more.

Full finger gloves help keep your hands warm in cool temperatures

  • Headband: On very cold mornings I like to start off wearing a headband. The headband keeps your ears and forehead warm, while still allowing heat to escape through the top of your head. As an added benefit, when it’s time to remove it, the headband is so small you almost won’t notice it in your pocket.

A headband helps keep your ears and forehead warm on cold mornings

  • Toe Warmers: I reserve these for only the coldest mornings. As the name implies, these are little half booties that go over the ends of your shoes to help add insulation to your toes. Again, once these are no longer needed, they can removed and stowed in a pocket. If you’re like me and have toes that, once cold, will never warm up no matter what, you may want to try oversocks, which are just like normal regular socks, but tougher, that you wear over your shoes to help them hold in some extra warmth. 

Toe warmers add some extra warmth to your feet on the coldest fall days

2. PAY ATTENTION TO THE WEATHER: Remember that cloudy days will be colder than sunny ones, and windy days will be colder than calm ones. It’s also a good idea to check the entire forecast for the day—or at least the next few hours. Dress appropriately for the weather, but if you’re unsure what to for given conditions, then check out this cool app from Bicycling Magazine.

3. PAY ATTENTION TO YOUR BODY: After I get dressed for a ride, I like to go stand in my driveway in an area exposed to the wind for a minute or two and see how I feel. On a cold morning you should start off feeling slightly chilled, but not cold. If you’re shivering, then you don’t have enough clothes on, so go back inside and add a layer. If you feel nice and toasty warm, that’s pretty much a guarantee you’ll be roasting within the next 20 minutes, so you could probably stand to drop a layer or two. During your ride it can sometimes be tough to know when it’s time to pull over and take off a layer or two. Surprisingly, your ears will generally be the best indicator of how hot you’re getting. If your ears start to feel warm or hot, then it’s time to either unzip or shed a layer.

4. BRIGHTEN IT UP: My favorite kit color is black, and I make no apologies for it. During the fall though, I realize that just isn’t practical or safe. The days are shorter, and drivers are more distracted with leaves and stuff, so it’s more important than ever to stand out while on the road. I personally opt for a fluoro yellow wind vest, and leg and arm warmers with plenty of reflective accents on them. You don’t necessarily have to go fluoro, but choosing a bright color like red, blue or yellow will help you be more visible to passing cars.

5. ROLL WELL STOCKED: Speaking of shorter days, you need to roll prepared when you ride in the fall—especially if you’re going solo. I always stuff a set of safety lights in my jersey pocket, even if I plan on being back before dark. A good set, like the Blackburn Flea 2.0 combo are lightweight and very bright. Also remember that there are fewer cyclists on the road, so there are fewer people who can help you if you are having mechanical problems. Make sure you have a flat repair kit and multi-tool, and you know how to use them. 

Product Profile: Louis Garneau Course collection

For 30 years, Louis Garneau has stayed the course with race-inspired, high-tech cycling clothing. Now, they’re introducing their Limited Edition, premium Course line that delivers even more technology and performance than ever before. You can find the entire Course collection on Performancebike.com, but here’s a breakdown of a few of the innovative new products from this collection of high performance cycling gear.

Winner of the 2012 Eurobike Award for design excellence and innovation, the Course SpeedZone cycling vest was developed in cooperation with Team Europcar to provide great utility and protection. Louis Garneau’s patent pending opening on the rear of the vest allows access to your jersey pockets and provides visibility if you are wearing a race number. The ultra-light, stretchy fabric moves with you, offers wind and water resistance and breathes extremely well, plus an inner flap behind the full zip gives further protection while the mesh back panel prevents overheating.

The Course Race cycling bib shorts are a perfect example of a product that has been specially constructed to shave seconds, maximize muscle performance and keep you going strong, long after you’ve dropped the rest of the pack. Tight-fitting, high-compression fabric supports your thighs for powerful pedaling efficiency and is embedded with sun-reflective, coldblack technology to prevent overheating. Minimal seams increase aerodynamics, Power Mesh bibs keep you cool and a “nature calls” panel makes for easy pit stops. The new 5Motion chamois closes the deal with the amazing comfort of 3D pre-shaped wings, vented mesh, pressure relieving zones and antibacterial protection.

Designed to help you ride better, faster and stronger, the Course Race cycling jersey is a great looking piece packed with serious high-tech features. Three innovative fabrics move with your body, increase aerodynamics and wick moisture, plus coldblack technology dramatically reduces the jersey’s temperature to prevent overheating. The Course Race jersey is full zip and features pre-shaped shoulders and a wide silicone gripper hem to keep the jersey in place when you’re down in the drops. Textured sleeves give you an aero edge and triple back pockets with MP3 compatibility hold your race essentials.

Gloves that combine a firm grip with the right amount of padding and aeration for competition can be hard to come by. But not anymore, thanks to Louis Garneau’s Course cycling gloves. Their progressive padding process relieves pressure on the ulnar and median nerves, plus eliminates sources of friction for an amazing level of comfort. Then they added a sun reflecting, coldblack finish to the upper, so your hands won’t overheat. Finally, they seamlessly integrated their Ergo Air Zone system for effective temperature regulation and moisture evacuation. Hands down, this is a hard glove to beat. [Note: Course cycling gloves are available for pre-order, and will be in stock at the end of November]

Louis Garneau pulls out all the stops in their most competitive footwear, the Course 2LS road shoes. They’re equipped with a thinner, lighter and stronger Exo-Jet carbon outsole, plus Garneau’s HRS-300 internal polymer system which effectively transfers all your energy into pure power. Multi-vent technology circulates air throughout the interior to keep your feet feeling dry and fresh. Insert the red insole for extra warmth in cold conditions or the blue insole with refrigerant for cool comfort in hot weather. Double BOA L5 closure system evenly distributes pressure, offers infinite degrees of fine-tuning and lets you customize the level of security and tension. [Note: Course 2LS road shoes are available for pre-order, but will not be in stock until early 2013]

Shop the entire Limited Edition, premium Course collection on Performancebike.com.

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