Ridden and Reviewed: Diamondback Haanjo and Haanjo Comp

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The Diamondback Haanjo Comp (left) and Haanjo Flat Bar (right)

You might have read lately about “adventure” or “gravel” bikes. Part cyclocross bike, part road bike, part touring bike, these rides are designed to help you go anywhere your imagination can take you—on or off road.

Over the past few weeks we got a chance to test out Diamondback’s Haanjo. We loved it so much that after the test was over we bought one for ourselves.

About The Bike

The Haanjo comes in two models, both of which we got to test out. Both are built around a high end aluminum frame and fork, with disc brake mounts, fender mounts, and rear rack mounts. The geometry of the Haanjo is pretty relaxed, with huge tire clearance (both bikes come with WTB All Terrain 32mm tires). The emphasis here is clearly on keeping the bike capable of going off road while staying stable and comfortable for the rider.

The Haanjo Comp comes with a Shimano 105 10-speed road group, short cage rear derailleur with an 11-28T cassette, drop bars, FSA Gossamer 46/36 ‘cross crankset, and TRP’s exceptional Hy/Rd mechanically-activated disc brakes.

The Haanjo comes with a Shimano Sora 9-speed flat bar road group, long cage rear derailleur with an 11-30T cassette, flat bars, FSA Gossamer 46/36 ‘cross crankset, and Avid BB5 mechanical disc brakes.

We tested both bikes.

Adventure awaits

Adventure awaits

 Unboxing and Set Up

Unboxing and set up for both bikes was pretty straight forward, since the bikes come 90% assembled. Just put the front wheel on, put the handlebars in the stem, and install the seatpost/saddle (already assembled). Each bike also comes with a pair of platform pedals, spare spokes, and some zip ties whose purpose remains a mystery, since they weren’t really necessary for setup.

Both bikes did need to have the brakes and derailleurs adjusted, but it wasn’t anything too major. The Avid BB5 brakes set up like any other mechanical disc brakes. The TRP brakes can be a little more frustratingly simple, so let us save you the headache: look for the knob with a picture of a lock on it. Unthread it counter clockwise until it pops up out of the socket. This will unlock the actuating arm. Once that is done, proceed much like you would with any other mechanical disc brake set up.

We added our own pedals, bottle cages, and saddle packs.

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The Ride

After spending a few days riding the Haanjo, we pretty much fell in love with the bike. It rode like no other bike we’ve ever tested… and we ride a lot of bikes. The best word we can think of to describe the ride feel is “confidence”. Whether we were on the road or on the trail, on the flat bar version or the drop bar version, we always felt confident in the bike’s ability to handle anything in its path.

The bike actually feels less like a CX bike-meets-road bike than it does a rigid mountain bike-meets-road bike…something that sounds admittedly dubious in theory but turns out to be amazing in reality. The Haanjo is easily the most versatile bike we’ve ever ridden. It doesn’t really excel in any one thing—it’s not as fast or lively as a road bike, nor as capable and controllable as a mountain bike—but it does very well in pretty much everything.

On the road the bike accelerates nicely, with smooth, predictable handling. The geometry on both bikes is also really nice for long days on the bike. The tall head tube, and slung-back geometry put you in a nice upright position that makes it easy on the back. The aluminum frame and fork feel nice and stiff for fairly snappy acceleration without any noticeable frame flex (even with a loaded rack on the back). Surprisingly we didn’t get any of the harsh road chatter we expected from this full aluminum rig, and the ride felt plush and comfortable. The WTB tires aren’t exactly the best for road riding, since the beefy tread and increased rolling resistance can slow your roll a little. For extended road riding, we replaced the WTB All Terrains with some Continental Gatorskin Hardshell 700x25c road tires.

Off road, the bike was just awesome. The handling almost felt more like we were riding a 29” mountain bike, instead of a twitchy CX bike. Thanks to the more upright geometry we were even able to take the bike over some more technical sections of trail without worrying about it too much—we felt totally in control of the bike. Off-road is also where the WTB tires came into their own. They really hooked into the trail nicely, with plenty of grip in the corners and hills, so we had the confidence to go full bore when we wanted to. The easy CX-style gearing meant that we had plenty of low-end gearing to make it up even the hardest inclines.

The stopping power of both the Avid and TRP disc brakes was impressive, even in the rain, mud, and dirt.

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The Verdict

Just awesome. If, in some sad alternate world, we could only own one bike, it would easily be the Haanjo. Its ability to literally do anything and go anywhere is unmatched. Sometimes with a bike like this, one that tries to be all things to all people, you end up with a bike that’s really nothing to anybody— but not in this case. Diamondback really cracked the code and delivered up something truly remarkable… which might be why every shipment we get sells through so quickly.

We did everything on the Haanjo: commuting, road riding, trail riding, gravel riding, bike camping with a fully loaded rack. The Haanjo is a bike that’s limited only by your imagination.

When the test was over and we had to give the bikes back, we were a little sad. So sad in fact that we decided to go out and get ourselves a Haanjo flat bar. We look forward to seeing where it takes us in the days ahead.

The Haanjo felt right at home anywhere we went

The Haanjo felt right at home anywhere we went

Diamondback Interval Carbon Flat Bar Road Bike

It’s not everyday that the most exciting bike in our offices turns out to be a flatbar road bike. Now, we don’t mean any disrespect…flatbar road bikes are fun to ride, comfortable and offer plenty of advantages… but they usually aren’t the bikes that everyone in the office crowds around to see. That is until the Diamondback Interval Carbon Flat Bar road bike showed up.

Diamondback Interval Carbon Flat Bar Road Bike

Diamondback Interval Carbon Flat Bar Road Bike

First off, lets start with that paint job. Wow. Between the amazing job they did on the Podium series and now this, we’d say that Diamondback’s graphics department is knocking it out of the park right now. With the subtle, nuanced paint job, pops of color, and thoughtfully designed graphics, this is a bike that will definitely turn heads out on the road. Or outside your garage. Or parked outside the coffee shop. Pretty much anywhere. And that frame isn’t all just pretty paint either. With the Interval Carbon, the true beauty lies in the details. The Interval Carbon is built around a high performance, full carbon frame with a nice, relaxed sloping geometry that’s easy on the shoulders and back, but is definitely stiff and responsive enough to have some get up and go if you’re so inclined. But take a look at the frame around the stem…see the top tube junction scoops down into the head tube? That’s a feature normally found on high-end time trial and aero road bikes to decrease the aerodynamic profile of the bike. And lets look at that fork, it looks shockingly like a time trial fork. With it’s narrow profile and a sculpted fairing that helps eliminate drag space with the down tube. But it also includes disc mounts. And fender braze-ons. The bike also has internal cable routing, and is compatible with both mechanical and electronic groupsets.

One of the most distinctive elements of the frame is the recessed head tube area

One of the most distinctive elements of the frame is the recessed head tube area

This is a bike that truly marries performance and comfort in the best possible way. Out of the box it’s equipped with a set of flat handlebars, Shimano Tiagra 10-speed trigger shifters and derailleurs and a set of hydraulic disc brakes. This gives you plenty of gearing and powerful stopping power to get around on any roads. Nice, big tire clearance lets you run some fairly large volume tires, and still gives you room for fenders. There is also a set of rack mounts in the back, if you’re the type that prefers to put your stuff on the bike instead of your back. The really intriguing thing to us though is how versatile this bike is. We took it out for a quick spin around the parking lot, and were really surprised at not only how fun it was ride, but also how responsive and lively it felt. This is a bike that responds to rider input, both in the pedals and the handlebars.

With a little bit of technical know-how, a rider could easily have multiple road bikes in the Diamondback Interval Carbon. Want to do a charity ride or just get out for some exercise on the weekend? Roll it out of the garage and you’ll have a comfortable bike that will go as fast as you want it to. Commuting or cruising around town? Throw a rack on it, some fenders and you have a super comfortable, practical bike for getting around. Doing a fast ride or even racing? Replace the flat bar and trigger shifters with some drop bars and Shimano STI levers, and you would have one sweet carbon fiber disc-brake road bike. If you’re looking for a bike that delivers the very best of all worlds, with unmatched performance, versatility, and flexibility, we would definitely recommend the Diamondback Interval Carbon flatbar road bike.

Diamondback Podium Optum Pro Cycling Team Edition Road Bike

Painted in team livery colors, hung with SRAM Red 22 and rolling on HED wheels, this is one serious machine

Painted in team livery colors, hung with SRAM Red 22 and rolling on HED wheels, this is one serious machine

It’s not often that most of us get to ride the exact same machines that the pro’s do. While we can buy team replica frames, most often they don’t come with the same parts that the pro’s actually ride. Sure you may end up with a bike that may have the same color scheme, and some of the components may look almost right, but when you see a close-up of the pro’s equipment you realize that what you ended up with is indeed just a replica. It’s not the same race-ready gear that is built to hold up to the rigors of the upper echelon of pro cycling.

But Diamondback set out to change all of that in 2014 when they announced that the Optum Pro Cycling presented by Kelly Benefit Strategies team was going to ride Diamondback Podium bikes. The Podium is one of the finest bikes we’ve ever had the opportunity to ride. Stiff, fast, responsive, and drop-dead gorgeous, these are bikes that can help Optum, and you, take the win. And this is no “team replica” bike either. The light Continuous Fiber Technology frameset is painted up in team livery colors, hung with pro-level SRAM Red 22 components, and rolling on stiff HED carbon tubulars – in short it’s the exact same bike the Optum pro’s will be riding in the Tour of California and other top races in North America and Europe. And the best news is, it’s now available at Performance Bicycle.

To see more, check out the gallery below.

Up Close With The Pro’s: Diamondback and Optum Pro Cycling

Optum Pro Cycling Training Camp, Feb. 2014

If you haven’t heard yet, one of America’s top pro teams has recently made the switch to Diamondback bikes for this upcoming season. The Optum Pro Cycling Presented by Kelly Benefit Strategies men’s and women’s team will be riding Diamondback’s amazing, and much lauded, Podium series bikes during the 2014 season. You’ll be able to spot these bikes everywhere from the Tour of California to the U.S. Pro Challenge.

Diamondback visited the Optum men's and women's team training camps in California

Diamondback visited the Optum men’s and women’s team training camps in California

To get a more in-depth look at what’s going on with the team, Diamondback took a trip to their training camp in Oxnard California.

Check out some photos here.

U.S. Women's National Champion Jade Wilcoxson was riding well at training camp

U.S. Women’s National Champion Jade Wilcoxson was riding well at training camp

While there, they caught up with U.S. Women’s National Champion Jade Wilcoxson and got to ask her a few questions.

Click here to read the article.

The team mechanics have their work cut out for them to prepare all of the team bikes for the season

The team mechanics have their work cut out for them preparing the team bikes for the season

They also took an opportunity to visit with the team mechanics and get the scoop on the new Diamondback bikes.

Click here to see what they had to say.

Meatball doesn't like being called Meatball. Can you think of a better nickname?

Can you think of a new nickname for this guy? Also, those socks are amazing.

And, of course, they got up close and personal with the delightful Mike “Meatball” Friedman. Apparently, he doesn’t like the nickname “Meatball” though.

So it’s time for a contest: Suggest a new nickname for Mike, and we’ll select the best one to receive a $50 gift card – just post your suggestion in a comment below by the end of the day on Friday 3/7/14.

To read the interview with Mike, click here.

The Diamondback Podium Optum Team Bike is now available from Performance Bicycle

And, of course, you can check out the whole line of Diamondback road bikes, including the new Optum Pro Team edition Diamondback Podium, at Performancebike.com.

Ridden and Reviewed: Diamondback Century Sport Disc Road Bike

Reviewing a bike is always a tricky business, especially when it incorporates new technology. But when we saw the new Diamondback Century Sport Disc, we knew we had to try it out.

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Diamondback Century Sport Disc

About The Bike: The Century Sport Disc is an aluminum bike with a full carbon fork. This bike is designed with the high-mileage enthusiast in mind, and it shows it with a nice and relaxed geometry that feels easy on the back and neck without feeling like you’re riding an upright beach cruiser. It’s outfitted with a mix of Shimano parts—sporting 105 shifters and front derailleur and an Ultegra 10-speed rear derailleur, and TRP’s Hy/Rd mechanically actuated hydraulic disc brakes.

Unboxing and Set Up: Unboxing and set up are fairly straight forward: the bike comes 90% assembled, so you only have to mount the wheels, handlebars, and seatpost. The only tools you’ll need are a set of hex wrenches and some bike grease. As with most bikes, the rear derailleur will need a bit of tuning—but compared to some other bikes we’ve assembled, it was minor– just two quarter turns of the barrel adjuster. The only major obstacle came with the brakes. We’ve set up disc brakes before, but these took some figuring out to get set up. Turns out it was maddeningly simple. So to save you a headache, here’s the key: look for the knob with a picture of a lock on it. Unthread it counter clockwise until it pops up out of the socket. This will unlock the actuating arm. Once that is done, proceed much like you would with any other mechanical disc brake set up (pinch the actuating arm to activate the brake, pull the cable tight, and tighten down the cable clamp bolt, then use the barrel adjuster to back off the cable tension until the rotor spins freely).

We added our own Time iClic Racer pedals,  bottle cage, and Garmin mount. Weight after assembly: 21.3 lbs.

The Ride: Our first ride on the Century Sport Disc started out with a group ride that turned into a two-man exploration of some local gravel roads. Over this varied terrain, the bike proved surprisingly fast, and it climbed fairly well.  The feel of the bike also impressed. Being an aluminum frame with an alloy seatpost, we expected a harsh, jarring ride, but that turned out not to be the case at all. The bike nicely soaked up road vibration and delivered a smooth road feel. Even on some rutted out gravel the bike felt stable, thanks to its long wheel base and the unexpectedly excellent tires (some nice, sticky Michelin Dynamic Sport 700×25’s).

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Handling was excellent, even on rough roads

Shockingly, we also found the saddle among the most comfortable stock saddles we’ve ever tried. Usually, the saddle is the first thing we discard when setting up a new bike, however for us the Diamondback Equation saddle (135mm wide) hits that nice sweet spot of just enough padding, just enough flex, and not being too wide or too narrow. The shape is also pretty middle of the road, with a nice graceful curve from the rear to the nose that didn’t rub on our legs or cause any hotspots. The center channel cutout also helps with numbness. (Our reviewer normally rides a 134mm Prologo Nago Evo saddle).

The carbon fork and BB386 bottom bracket definitely helped stiffen the bike up, which helps with performance by improving power transmission and minimizing frame flex. It’s not quite on par with a carbon bike, but for what this bike was designed for, it’s more than adequate.  The geometry is a little more upright than we’re used to, but it actually felt pretty good on the back and neck. Sitting more upright did make us work a little harder when riding into the wind, but we were more than able to keep up with a fast group ride without any problems. It’s important to remember though that this isn’t a race bike—this bike is built for those putting in long hours in the saddle.

The tapered headtube and carbon fork helped stiffen up the bike

The tapered headtube and carbon fork helped stiffen up the bike

The handling was nice and stable, with no hints of the twitchiness we’ve come to expect from more racy-steeds which sometimes have pushed us to the edge of our comfort zones. On gravel roads, the bike was responsive enough to help us ditch some pot holes at the last minute, and even bunny hop others that we saw a little too late. The bike is spec’ed with slightly wider bars than normal (44cm on a 54cm bike, versus the usual 42cm) to give the bike a more stable feel akin to a flatbar road bike, but with the ability to ride in the drops. Handlebars are fairly inexpensive (a set of Forte Team alloy bars are about $39), so if you want to switch to a narrower bar for more nimble handling, it won’t break the bank.

Now for the disc brakes: our bike arrived the day that SRAM announced their hydraulic road recall. Even though the TRP Hy/Rd is a fundamentally different system, we still eyed the fluid reservoir with not a little apprehension. Fortunately, our fears were unfounded. The bike stopped on a dime without a single hiccough, even on gravel roads and steep descents. In fact, sometimes it almost worked a little too well. If you’re used to traditional road calipers, then you’ll need to remember that “less is more” with disc brakes. Because the system is mechanically activated (the cable actuates the hydraulic piston, which actuates the braking arm), you don’t really have to worry about boiling the fluid on long descents, and the sealed hydraulic chamber has almost no chance of developing the air bubbles that brought down SRAM’s systems. They are definitely powerful, and performed well even in wet, muddy conditions we encountered on gravel roads.

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TRP Hy/Rd brakes provided excellent stopping power

The Verdict: The Diamondback Century Sport Disc is an excellent bike for riders looking to put in long miles, ride in bad weather, or looking for a first road bike. Even our less experienced testers felt right at home on the bike, thanks to its stable handling and the confident braking feel they got from the Hy/Rd system. The spec is decent for this price range, with the high-end Ultegra rear derailleur, BB386 bottom bracket system, and TRP hydraulic system all normally found at a much higher price point. However, if you’re looking for a bike that’ll climb like a champ or that will help you take the town line sprint, then you may instead want to look at the Diamondback Podium series to get that extra performance edge. A racing bike, this ain’t. But for Gran Fondo’s, charity rides, and club outings, this is a bike that definitely has the chops to help you stay with the group without pushing you to the limit.

Recommended Upgrades: As it is the Century Sport Disc, is a great bike. However, if you want to get a little more out of it, here are the upgrades we would recommend.

  • Carbon Seatpost: A carbon seatpost will help the bike feel a little smoother on rough roads or gravel
  • Wheels: A good wheel upgrade, like the Stans Alpha 340, will help shed weight and improve ride feel, performance, and handling
  • Crank: The FSA Gossamer that is spec’d on the Century Sport Disc is perfectly fine, but a carbon crank like the FSA SL-K compact will help take the bike’s performance up a notch or two with stiffer rings, lighter arms, and improved power transmission

Kid In A Candy Shop: Our Favorite Bikes

Last week, my coworker Aaron and I got to talking about our favorite bikes. Working in the cycling industry, we get a chance to ride some great stuff, and we’re always impressed by the bikes that the likes of Fuji, GT, Diamondback, Devinci, Van Dessel, and our own in-house guys at Scattante turn out.

But inevitably, the question always comes up: what is your favorite bike? With so many good ones out there, it was hard to choose, so to narrow down the challenge, we decided we had to pick three favorites.

  1. The “Dream Bike”– if cost were no object, what would you ride?
  2. The “Next Bike”– what is the bike we’re probably going to be riding next season?
  3. The “Best Bang For the Buck” Bike– of all the bikes available from Performance, what is the best value for the money (in our opinion)?

BRIAN

Dream Bike: 2014 Diamondback Podium Equipe Campagnolo Super Record EPS Road Bike

It seems like an obvious move to pick the $10k road bike, but there’s good reason here. Namely, I love Campagnolo and I thirst for EPS. And I also think the Podium is  one of the most beautiful and distinctive road bikes out there right now. Diamondback really knocked this one out of the park with the color-matched parts and frame in the distinctive “wet” red look, a full Campy Super Record 11 EPS gruppo, and carbon fiber HED wheels. Plus, Diamondback did all their own R&D and development on the frame and fork, and the ride quality is right up there with any other pro-level frameset.

2014 Diamondback Podium Equipe Campagnolo Super Record EPS 11-Speed Road Bike

Next Bike: Fuji Altamira 2.1 C Campagnolo Athena EPS Road Bike

Not being a big fan of the all-Top Ramen diet, next season will more than likely see me on the Fuji Altamira 2.1 C instead of the Podium. But that’s just fine by me. Campy’s EPS system is absolutely incredible, and Athena EPS is exactly identical to the Super Record variety, except the parts are aluminum instead of carbon fiber– which is actually a bit of a benefit because it means better crash survivability. I’ve heard nothing but great things about electronic shifting performance from other coworkers, so I’m excited to test it out for myself.

2013 Fuji Altamira 2.1 Road Bike

Best Bang For The Buck: 2014 Fuji Roubaix 1.3

If I were trying to get the most value for my dollar out of a bike, I would go straight for the Roubaix 1.3. This alloy bike packs some serious punch in the parts department. A carbon fiber fork and a full 10-speed Shimano 105 drivetrain give this bike plenty of performance for the dollar. The compact crank is paired with an 11-28T cassette, which means you’ll have the perfect gearing for casual riding or racing right off the bat– all for around a thousand dollars. Plus, the frame is stiff, light, and fast enough that it can easily grow with you if you decide to upgrade components over time.

2014 Fuji Roubaix 1.3 C Road Bike

AARON

Dream Bike: 2014 Devinci Atlas RC Carbon 29er Mountain Bike

For me, the DeVinci Atlas is all about having a really lightweight carbon 29er with Shimano XT and a Fox Float 32 CTD FIT 29 fork that can go out and fly on the trails. Plus, it’s just a little extra mashed so it’s awesome at downhill but won’t be weird on regular single track.

2014 Devinci Atlas RC Carbon 29er Mountain Bike

Next Bike: 2014 GT Force Carbon Expert 27.5″ Mountain Bike

The carbon fiber Force is all about AM riding all-day long on a very smooth, comfy, bike. The great parts spec and cushy, full suspension will mean you won’t still be feeling the trail hits later in that night. Plus, you get the new 27.5″ wheels that give you plenty of speed and maneuverability on the trail.

2014 GT Force Carbon Expert 27.5″ Mountain Bike

Best Bang For The Buck: 2014 Fuji Nevada 29 1.1 Mountain Bike

If I was looking for a bike that could really tackle the trail on a budget, I think this is the best option– since you don’t see too many 29ers with this spec at this pricepoint. For about a grand you get an aluminum 29″ frame, 100mm travel fork, and a mix of Deore and XT. You could  ride this one all day and stay pretty happy.

2014 Fuji Nevada 29 1.1 Mountain Sport Bike

Wordless Wednesday

Diamondback Bicycles pro rider Kelly McGarry taking second place in the 2013 Red Bull Rampage with a backflip over a 72-foot-long canyon gap (the first place run wasn’t too bad either, as GT Bicycles rider Kyle Strait took the win with a suicide no-hander).

Product Profile: Diamondback Bicycle 2014 Overdrive Carbon Hardtails

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When we heard that Diamondback was adding a new lineup of Overdrive Carbon hardtail mountain bikes for 2014, we were excited. Utilizing the same trail/XC geometry as Diamondback’s Aluminum Overdrive series, the 29″-wheeled Overdrive Carbon designs incorporate their proprietary Advanced Monocoque Molding Process (AMMP) technology using the highest-grade carbon, constructed in the most precise manner, to produce world-class cross country machines. Our bike buyer, Ben, got a chance to try out one of the new high-speed off-road machines at the 2013 Sea Otter Classic XC race (a stern 40 mile test of California hills and dusty trails). How did he sum up the new bike? In a word – impressed. He called the Overdrive Carbon “a great all-around 29er race bike that climbs like a mountain goat, with crisp, precise single track handling and the components to match.”

2014 Diamondback Overdrive Carbon Pro Mountain Bike

2014 Diamondback Overdrive Carbon Pro Mountain Bike

The 2014 Diamondback Overdrive Carbon Pro Mountain Bike is dialed-in from top to bottom, featuring a lightweight carbon frame, Fox suspension and SRAM XO components. 142×12mm carbon rear drop out, a tapered head tube, and a 15mm thru-axle fork increase stiffness for enhanced steering and traction. The sloping top tube provides ample standover clearance. A 71° head tube angle and a 73° seat tube angle create the perfect XC/trail geometry. The 440mm (17.3 inch) chainstays equate to an extremely snappy bike.

The top shelf FOX 32 FLOAT CTD 29″ E-S fork gives you 100mm of plush travel up front with a CTD damper that supplies five different compression settings to optimize your ride for low and high rates of speed from a handlebar-mounted remote. A top shelf SRAM XO group including shifters, derailleurs and hydraulic disc brakes give you the absolute best of the best in performance, period. Add in Easton EA90XC 29″ Clincher wheels and you have one of the most comprehensive competition-based packages on the market.

2014 Diamondback Overdrive Carbon Expert Mountain Bike

2014 Diamondback Overdrive Carbon Expert Mountain Bike

The 2014 Diamondback Overdrive Carbon Expert Mountain Bike is built for maximum speed, stiffness and fun. With the same lightweight carbon frame and Fox suspension as the Overdrive Carbon Pro, the Overdrive Carbon Expert comes equipped with SRAM X7/X9 components. The bike’s Avid Elixir 7 Hydraulic Disc brakes have 180mm front and 160mm rear rotors for maximum modulation on the trail. The 10 speed drivetrain features a high quality X7 Front derailleur, X9 Type 2 Rear Derailleur and the S1400 10-speed crankset. Add in Diamondback SL-7 double wall rims with WTB Wolverine Race tires and you are set to conquer any and all off-road obstacles.

2014 Diamondback Overdrive Carbon Mountain Bike

2014 Diamondback Overdrive Carbon Mountain Bike

The 2014 Diamondback Overdrive Carbon Mountain Bike is sure to elevate your heart rate before you even hit the saddle. Utilizing the same Advanced Monocoque Molding Process (AMMP) carbon frame as the Overdrive Carbon Pro and the Overdrive Carbon Expert guarantees an extremely snappy bike with enhanced stiffness for precise steering and control. Avid Elixir 1 Hydraulic Disc brakes with 180mm front and 160mm rear rotors provide ample stopping power. SRAM provides a 10-speed drivetrain with an X5 Front derailleur and crankset mated to an X7 long cage rear derailleur for smooth shifting performance. Diamondback SL-7 double wall rims with WTB Wolverine Race tires round out this race and trail-ready package.

Burn 24 Hour Challenge 2011 Recap

Over Memorial Day weekend, a team of 4 from our corporate HQ (in Chapel Hill, NC) set out for the Dark Mountain trails (in Wilkesboro, NC) for the 2011 Burn 24 Hour Challenge mountain bike race.  If you’ve never raced in a 24 hour mountain bike race before, it’s a pretty simple proposition: ride as many laps as you can in 24 hours, all through the day and night, either by yourself or as part of a 2-person or 3-5 person team.  As you might imagine, it’s part endurance, part speed, part madness, and completely fun (well, maybe not for the solo riders)!  The organizers and volunteers of the Burn 24 Hour Challenge really work hard to put on a first-class event, so all you have to do is get on your bike and pedal, and pedal, and pedal….

Here’s our crew at the start of the race (that’s Chris, Greg, Tom and David from left to right), posing in our intimidating all black Performance Ultra II jersey and short race kits while standing next to our equally intimidating Access Stealth 1.0 29er mountain bike.  While we were at the race, Tyler from Bikerumor.com dropped by our tent to take a look at the new Stealth 1.0, and you can check out his post about our sub-21 pound trail rocket here.

To get a sense of what the race was like, we asked both of our 24-hour race rookies to write up a few words about their experiences – first up is Greg, our freeriding, dirt-jumping expert:

The race was a blast. I always love riding new trail, even if Dark Mountain offered way more climbing than I was used to. But the atmosphere was what really sold the whole experience. The folks at Burn put on one heck of a race. Sure, there were a few people out there with their eyes on the podium, but there were plenty of racers just content with alternating decent laps with some chill time sitting in the pits cooking dinner and cheering on the constant stream of riders.

I’d have to say my favorite part was the final descent. As you dove down the ridge, you’d start to hear the cheering and cowbells. The pace picked up quickly, and the trail would start throwing in massive berms and a few doubles just to keep things interesting.

Our other rookie racer was Tom, a former triathlete who has lately found his true passion riding fat tires:

24-hour racing is a blast.  As a newbie I was concerned I wouldn’t get enough riding in sharing the load with 3 strong riders…but I got all I could handle.  This was the most fun I’ve ever had suffering.  It was hot and hilly and great company for all.  I was a bit disappointed to see the compression sock phenomenon spilling over though!  Thought I got away from that when I left triathlon.

It was a great atmosphere, and a fantastic way to spend the weekend. Highlights… guilt-free Nathan’s hotdogs, night riding, and the amazing scenery.

Our team may not have been turning the fastest lap times,  but we definitely had a great time and made a bunch of new friends, as folks dropped by our tent to check out the Stealth 1.0 or snag some free samples of PowerBar Gel Blasts and PowerGels (the green apple flavor gel was a crowd favorite).

We also took the opportunity to test out a slew of cycling headlights in real racing conditions, from tried-and-true favorites to some brand new options.  We’ll share some of our light testing results here on the blog in the coming weeks, for those looking for a new setup to hit the trails at night.  Even if you don’t try out 24-hour racing, you should definitely give night riding a try – it makes riding trails that you know like the back of your hand a whole new, and exhilarating, experience!

To see more photos from this year’s Burn 24, head on over to the Performance Facebook page and check out our Burn 24 Hour Challenge 2011 photo gallery – be sure to log in and let us know what pics you like!

Product Profile: 2011 Diamondback Podium 6

EDIT:  Since the value of the Diamondback Podium 6 we talked about below was recognized by so many of you out there, we don’t have any more in stock online.  But that doesn’t mean that you have to miss out on the great 880 gram frame of the Podium 6, as we still have the Diamondback Podium 5 road bike in stock and ready to ship.  Featuring the Podium carbon frame but with Shimano 105 components, the Podium 5 road bike is another great value from the folks at Diamondback!

Diamondback Podium 5 Item #30-4903

For today’s product profile, we’re bringing you a new ride from an unexpected source.  Our friends at Diamondback have been busy lately, not only refining their lineup of mountain bikes and BMX bikes, but also developing a brand new line of full carbon road bikes.  That’s right, we said full carbon road bikes!  Of course we were intrigued, so our bike product manager, Devlin, took the cross-country flight out to Washington to meet the folks at Diamondback and try out their new bike, the 2011 Podium 6 road bike, on its home turf:

Mercer Island, located on the expansive waters of Lake Washington and only minutes from the greater Seattle area, is host to fast, rolling road rides with steep banked turns and exhilarating descents. When I heard that the crew at Diamondback were going to unveil their 2011 Podium 6 road bike here I was skeptical. After all, a brand steeped in BMX and mountain bike heritage was suddenly going to break in to road biking right at the top with a Shimano Ultegra equipped full carbon frame and fork.

At first glance, the Podium 6 is right on target. The 880 gram frame has all of the characteristics of today’s best carbon road bikes: an oversized tapered head tube fitted with a full carbon fork, massive BB30 bottom bracket for superior stiffness, curved seat and chain stays for added comfort, and an arrestingly minimal top tube. Diamondback product manager Michael Brown appropriately chose an eye-catching FSA SL-K component package and Shimano R530 wheels.

We rolled out of the parking lot at warm up speed. I noticed immediately how stable and comfortable the bike felt. It took little effort to turn over the carbon SLK cranks and the surprisingly spritely wheels accelerated well as the pace picked up. The first hill proved the Podium 6 to be a great climber. The frame was stiff, yet refreshingly compliant. The bike cornered confidently and efficiently on the following descent. The Shimano Ultegra components are well proven to be both lightweight and precise and were well matched to the Podium 6. Overall, the 2011 Diamondback Podium 6 is a fantastic choice for any rider looking for the elusive balance between great all-around road performance at a great price. We look forward to introducing this terrific value to our stores and web site this March.

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