Ridden and Reviewed: Diamondback Century Sport Disc Road Bike

Reviewing a bike is always a tricky business, especially when it incorporates new technology. But when we saw the new Diamondback Century Sport Disc, we knew we had to try it out.

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Diamondback Century Sport Disc

About The Bike: The Century Sport Disc is an aluminum bike with a full carbon fork. This bike is designed with the high-mileage enthusiast in mind, and it shows it with a nice and relaxed geometry that feels easy on the back and neck without feeling like you’re riding an upright beach cruiser. It’s outfitted with a mix of Shimano parts—sporting 105 shifters and front derailleur and an Ultegra 10-speed rear derailleur, and TRP’s Hy/Rd mechanically actuated hydraulic disc brakes.

Unboxing and Set Up: Unboxing and set up are fairly straight forward: the bike comes 90% assembled, so you only have to mount the wheels, handlebars, and seatpost. The only tools you’ll need are a set of hex wrenches and some bike grease. As with most bikes, the rear derailleur will need a bit of tuning—but compared to some other bikes we’ve assembled, it was minor– just two quarter turns of the barrel adjuster. The only major obstacle came with the brakes. We’ve set up disc brakes before, but these took some figuring out to get set up. Turns out it was maddeningly simple. So to save you a headache, here’s the key: look for the knob with a picture of a lock on it. Unthread it counter clockwise until it pops up out of the socket. This will unlock the actuating arm. Once that is done, proceed much like you would with any other mechanical disc brake set up (pinch the actuating arm to activate the brake, pull the cable tight, and tighten down the cable clamp bolt, then use the barrel adjuster to back off the cable tension until the rotor spins freely).

We added our own Time iClic Racer pedals,  bottle cage, and Garmin mount. Weight after assembly: 21.3 lbs.

The Ride: Our first ride on the Century Sport Disc started out with a group ride that turned into a two-man exploration of some local gravel roads. Over this varied terrain, the bike proved surprisingly fast, and it climbed fairly well.  The feel of the bike also impressed. Being an aluminum frame with an alloy seatpost, we expected a harsh, jarring ride, but that turned out not to be the case at all. The bike nicely soaked up road vibration and delivered a smooth road feel. Even on some rutted out gravel the bike felt stable, thanks to its long wheel base and the unexpectedly excellent tires (some nice, sticky Michelin Dynamic Sport 700×25’s).

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Handling was excellent, even on rough roads

Shockingly, we also found the saddle among the most comfortable stock saddles we’ve ever tried. Usually, the saddle is the first thing we discard when setting up a new bike, however for us the Diamondback Equation saddle (135mm wide) hits that nice sweet spot of just enough padding, just enough flex, and not being too wide or too narrow. The shape is also pretty middle of the road, with a nice graceful curve from the rear to the nose that didn’t rub on our legs or cause any hotspots. The center channel cutout also helps with numbness. (Our reviewer normally rides a 134mm Prologo Nago Evo saddle).

The carbon fork and BB386 bottom bracket definitely helped stiffen the bike up, which helps with performance by improving power transmission and minimizing frame flex. It’s not quite on par with a carbon bike, but for what this bike was designed for, it’s more than adequate.  The geometry is a little more upright than we’re used to, but it actually felt pretty good on the back and neck. Sitting more upright did make us work a little harder when riding into the wind, but we were more than able to keep up with a fast group ride without any problems. It’s important to remember though that this isn’t a race bike—this bike is built for those putting in long hours in the saddle.

The tapered headtube and carbon fork helped stiffen up the bike

The tapered headtube and carbon fork helped stiffen up the bike

The handling was nice and stable, with no hints of the twitchiness we’ve come to expect from more racy-steeds which sometimes have pushed us to the edge of our comfort zones. On gravel roads, the bike was responsive enough to help us ditch some pot holes at the last minute, and even bunny hop others that we saw a little too late. The bike is spec’ed with slightly wider bars than normal (44cm on a 54cm bike, versus the usual 42cm) to give the bike a more stable feel akin to a flatbar road bike, but with the ability to ride in the drops. Handlebars are fairly inexpensive (a set of Forte Team alloy bars are about $39), so if you want to switch to a narrower bar for more nimble handling, it won’t break the bank.

Now for the disc brakes: our bike arrived the day that SRAM announced their hydraulic road recall. Even though the TRP Hy/Rd is a fundamentally different system, we still eyed the fluid reservoir with not a little apprehension. Fortunately, our fears were unfounded. The bike stopped on a dime without a single hiccough, even on gravel roads and steep descents. In fact, sometimes it almost worked a little too well. If you’re used to traditional road calipers, then you’ll need to remember that “less is more” with disc brakes. Because the system is mechanically activated (the cable actuates the hydraulic piston, which actuates the braking arm), you don’t really have to worry about boiling the fluid on long descents, and the sealed hydraulic chamber has almost no chance of developing the air bubbles that brought down SRAM’s systems. They are definitely powerful, and performed well even in wet, muddy conditions we encountered on gravel roads.

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TRP Hy/Rd brakes provided excellent stopping power

The Verdict: The Diamondback Century Sport Disc is an excellent bike for riders looking to put in long miles, ride in bad weather, or looking for a first road bike. Even our less experienced testers felt right at home on the bike, thanks to its stable handling and the confident braking feel they got from the Hy/Rd system. The spec is decent for this price range, with the high-end Ultegra rear derailleur, BB386 bottom bracket system, and TRP hydraulic system all normally found at a much higher price point. However, if you’re looking for a bike that’ll climb like a champ or that will help you take the town line sprint, then you may instead want to look at the Diamondback Podium series to get that extra performance edge. A racing bike, this ain’t. But for Gran Fondo’s, charity rides, and club outings, this is a bike that definitely has the chops to help you stay with the group without pushing you to the limit.

Recommended Upgrades: As it is the Century Sport Disc, is a great bike. However, if you want to get a little more out of it, here are the upgrades we would recommend.

  • Carbon Seatpost: A carbon seatpost will help the bike feel a little smoother on rough roads or gravel
  • Wheels: A good wheel upgrade, like the Stans Alpha 340, will help shed weight and improve ride feel, performance, and handling
  • Crank: The FSA Gossamer that is spec’d on the Century Sport Disc is perfectly fine, but a carbon crank like the FSA SL-K compact will help take the bike’s performance up a notch or two with stiffer rings, lighter arms, and improved power transmission

Product Preview: Scattante CX 350

The Scattante CX350

The Scattante CX350

The Scattante CX 350 is a brand-new workhorse cyclocross bike that our guys over in the bikes division dreamed up. The CX 350 is designed from the ground up to be a do-it-all kind of bike. It features a stiff, durable alloy frame, reliable, premium Shimano components, and mechanical disc brakes for all-weather stopping power. The bike also features full eyelets, for mounting fenders or a rack.

No matter what you’re looking for in a bike, the CX 350 is the bike that can do it. It’s ready out of the box to ride ‘cross if that’s what you’re into. Have some fire roads in your area? Head out and explore, confident that the knobby tires and disc brakes will give you plenty of traction and control. Or you can change out the knobby tires for some road tires and head out for a road ride. Need to get to work? Mount a rack on it, attach some lights and you’ll get there in no time.

There’s a million ways to ride the Scattante CX 350—but only a limited time to get one.

Stay tuned for more bike profiles, coming soon.

Shimano shifting components deliver crisp, snappy shifting

Shimano shifting components deliver crisp, snappy shifting

Mechanical disc brakes give the SCX350 all-weather stopping power

Mechanical disc brakes give the CX350 all-weather stopping power

A 46/34 cross crankset gives you plenty of gearing for any course or terrain

A 46/34 cross crankset gives you plenty of gearing for any course or terrain

The alloy frame is durable, lightweight, and completely versatile

The alloy frame is durable, lightweight, and completely versatile

2014 Scattante CFX Black Cyclocross Bikes

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When we first introduced the Scattante CFX Black cyclocross bike in 2012, we broke some new ground. It wasn’t our first foray into the world of ‘cross, but the CFX took things to a whole new level. We designed the bike from the ground up to be ready to take you to the podium with a full carbon fiber frameset, SRAM Force 10-speed group and, most importantly, the addition of recently-legalized disc brakes.

Well, we’re never really content to rest on our laurels, so after the success of the 2013 CFX Black, we did it again.

The all-new 2014 Scattante CFX Black cyclocross bike is now available, and for 2014 it comes in two flavors: one with SRAM Red 22 Hydro with hydraulic disc brakes and 11-speed drivetrain, the other comes with SRAM Force 22 with mechanical disc brakes, and also features 11-speed shifting. We’re immensely proud of both of these bikes, and confident that they’ll take your CX season to a new level. You can get to know both of these beauties a little better below.

The Scattante CFX Black. It's business time.

The Scattante CFX Black. It’s business time.

The Scattante CFX Black SRAM Red 22 Hydro

The Scattante CFX Black SRAM Red 22 Hydro is among the best bikes we’ve ever built. It’s loaded with high-end, high-performance features that have only one goal: to put you on the podium. This is a no-nonsense race bike that begs to be ridden hard. And thanks to the addition of a SRAM Hydro braking system, you can stop hard, too. The Hydro levers make look a little funny, but don’t be fooled, there’s some serious technology under those hoods.

Features:

  • ScDT carbon tech delivers a frame and fork with the precision and handling ability required for cyclocross competition
  • Hydraulic SRAM Red disc brakes increase stopping power, especially in adverse weather conditions
  • SRAM 22 Hydraulic drivetrain has 11-speeds and a cross specific 46/36 crank configuration
  • Stan’s ZTR Alpha 340 wheels are tubeless compatible to run lower pressure for increased traction in muck and mud
  • FSA Energy components bring serious durability and versatility to the cross course
2013 Scattante CFX Black with SRAM Red 22 Hydro

2013 Scattante CFX Black with SRAM Red 22 Hydro

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Hydraulic SRAM Red 22 shifters

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Hydraulic SRAM Red disc brakes

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Cross specific 46/36 SRAM Red 22 crankset

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ScDT carbon frame and fork

The Scattante CFX Black SRAM Force 22

The Scattante CFX Black SRAM Force 22 is a bike that refuses to play second fiddle. Sure, it’s a little more modestly priced, but that doesn’t mean you get more modest performance. It features the same ScDT carbon technology, wheels and build kit as its big brother. But instead of a hydraulic braking system, instead you get Force 22 with mechanical disc brakes. The redesigned shifters, all-new crank design, and True 22 shifting technology make this bike a force to be reckoned with.

  • ScDT carbon tech delivers a frame and fork with the precision and handling ability required for cyclocross competition
  • Avid BB7 Disc brakes increase stopping power, especially in adverse weather conditions
  • SRAM Force 22 drivetrain has 11-speeds and a cross specific 46/36 crank configuration
  • Stan’s ZTR Alpha 340 wheels are tubeless compatible to run lower pressure for increased traction in muck and mud
  • FSA Energy components bring serious durability and versatility to the cross course
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2013 Scattante CFX Black with SRAM Force 22

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11-speed SRAM Force 22 drivetrain

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Cross specific 46/36 crank configuration

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Avid BB7 Disc brakes

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ScDT carbon frame and fork

Gear Up For Cross

Here at Performance Bicycle, there’s a palpable excitement in the air. Because it’s that time of year again. A time when the nights feel cooler. When the smells of embrocation and frites are in the air, and the ring of cowbells resounds across the hills. A time of year when we trade in our skinny tires, glorious afternoons spent on sun dappled stretches of road, and retiring mid-ride banter for the mud-slinging, loosely organized bit of mayhem we know as cyclocross.

If you’re interested in trying out cyclocross, or just want to learn more about it, check out the Cyclocross Basics article over in the Performance Bicycle Learning Center.

So what do you need to get your season start off right? Performance Associates Ben and Ross are here to help guide us through Gearing Up For Cross Season.

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7 Essentials To Start Your Cross Season Right

1. Cyclocross bike: it’s important to have the right tools for the job. We’re pretty big fans of the 2013 Scattante cyclocross bikes (if we do say so ourselves…), including the all-new Scattante CFX bikes, now equipped with either Red 22 Hydro or Force 22 to get you to the top of the podium.

2. Mountain bike shoes: it’s not very easy to run in road shoes. Mountain bike shoes have a lugged outsole to make it easier to leap over barriers or run up hills. Mountain bike pedals are also used, since they are easier to get in and out of and shed mud well.

3. Helmet: when you’re riding like a madman (or woman) through mud, running with a bicycle on your shoulder, and leaping over barriers, it’s a good idea to make sure that your head is protected.

4. Long sleeve jersey and bib shorts, or a skinsuit: ‘cross races have a reputation for being challenging, so the last thing you want is to worry about being too cold or your saddle rubbing you the wrong way.

5. Cantilever or disc brakes: either one is fine so long as they fit your bike, but these brakes have enough clearance to allow even the muddiest tires to keep spinning.

6. Eyewear: it’s inevitable that you’ll end up getting sprayed in the face with mud, sand and who knows what else. Protect your eyes with a quality pair of sunglasses.

7. Knobby tires: knobby tires give you just enough traction to keep rolling through the mud, but without slowing you down on the flat and fast parts of the course.

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